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1 



Report of Births, Marriages, 
Divorces and Deaths 



Rhode Island. Division of Vital Statistics, Rhode Island. 
Dept. of State, Rhode Island. Registrar of Vital Statistic 



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FORTY-FOURTH REPORT 



RELATING TO THE 



REGISTRY AND RETURN 



Births, Marriages and Deaths, 



AND OF DIVORCE, 



STATE OF RHODE ISLAND, 



YEAR ENDING DEGEMBEU 31, 1S06, 



PREPARED BY 



GARDNER T. SWARTS, M. D., 

STATE REGISTRAR OF VITAL STATISTICS; SECRETARY OP THE STATE BOARD OP HEALTH; 
COMMISSIONER OF PUBLIC HEALTH. 



PROVIDENCE, R. I. 

K. L. FUEEMAN A SONS, PRINTEUS TO THE STATE. 

1898. 



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MEMBERS 



Rhode Island State Board of Health, 



Post Office Address. 

ALBERT G. SPRA.GUE, M. jy .President River Point KentCountt. 

SAMUEL M. GRAY, C. E Providence Providence Co. 

JOHN C. BUDLONG, M. D Providence Providence Co. 

REV. GEORGE L. LOCKE Bristol Bristol County. 

ALEXANDER B. BRIGGS, M. D Ashaway Washington Co. 

PETER P. CURLEY, M. D Newport Newport County. 

GARDNER T. SWARTS, M. D Providence Providence Co. 

GARDNER T. SWARTS. Secretary. 



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^Me of ^kade ^shnd and ^jovidence igbntaiions. 



Office of thk State Registrar of Vital Statistics. 

Providence, R. I., March 1, 1898. 

To the Honorable General Assembly: 

The Forty-Fourth Annual Report upon the Registration of Births, Marriages 
and Deaths in Rhode Island, and including judicial procedures in relation to di- 
vorce, during the year 1896, with compeudiary Tables of the results of registra- 
tion in the previous years, is herewith respectfully submitted. 

The plan of preceding years, in regard to the general arrangement of the 
Tables, summaries and comments, has been followed in this report, with some 
additional Tables, and a few special changes made to meet certain require- 
ments. 

In the special Tables the object has been to present the important facts of 
many years of registration, as well as of single years, in such manner as to 
make them readily apparent, and relieve the reader of the statistics of much 
of the labor of personal examination of each of the general Tables of the 
preceding reports, for the purpose of ascertaining the relation the various facts 
bear to each other. 

In previous reports the proportion of births, marriages and deaths to the 
population have been estimated in various ways. For a few years the estima- 
tion was made upon the figures derived from the census taken in a given year, 
and the same number of population used each year until the next census was 
available. In other periods an estimate was made upon an arithmetical in- 
crease. The present issue, however, gives all estimates in proportion to popu- 
lation by geometrical ratio, and which gives a more rational uniform increase 
than has been previously observed. This is seen in Table XVI. 

The same form of nomenclature and classification that was introduced into 
the previous issue has been retained, since it is believed that it conforms more 
correctly to the present understood aetiology of disease. 

Changes have therefore been made which may seem arbitrary, but are surely 
more satisfactory as a classificati<>n than that previously used. Under the class 



165945 

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iv FORTY-FOURTH REGISTRATION REPORT. [1896. 

of Zymotic Diseases we have previously had Miasmatic Diseases as Order, or 
Group One, and Enthetic Diseases as Order, or Group Two. As the woi"d 
Miasmatic is inappropriate at the present day to such diseases as diphtheria, 
measles and scarlet fever, and as these diseases are, with many others, depend- 
ent upon the introduction into the system of a morbific material, they are, 
therefore, contagious or infectious. As some controversy is liable to arise as 
to the preference in use of either of these terms, it has been thought desirable 
to use the word Communicable, which will include both. In this group have 
been gathered all diseases acknowledged to be dependent upon the presence of 
some morbid entity which in some instances has been demonstrated to be due 
to a micro-organism, while with others it is assumed by analogy to these con- 
ditions that they may be due to the same cause. 

A more extended explanation of the re-classiflcation of these diseases will be 
found under Names of Causes of Death, in Appendix A, page 267 of this report. 

Respectfully, 

GARDNER T. SVVARTS, 

State Registrar, 



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CONTENTS. 

See Index, page 293. 



General Tables. 

Table I. General summary of the births, marriages and deaths, in 1896, 
in each town and each county in the State, showing the number of 
births, the sex and parentage of those born ; the number of marriages, 
with the nativity of those married ; the number of deaths, with the sex 
and nativity of those who died ; the aggregate and average age of the 
decedents of each sex, and of the whole number of decedents whose age 
was given 2-5 

Table II. Births; showing the number of each sex born in each month 
of the year, in the several divisions of the State 6-7 

Table III. Plurality births; arranged by months, sexes, and divisions 
of the Slate, and showinij the nativity of the parents 8 

Table IV. Marriages; the number in each month and in each quarter 

of the year, in the several divisions of the State 9 

Table V. Deaths; showing the number of decedents of each sex in each 
month, in the several divisions of the State 10-11 

Table VI. Deaths ; showing the number of each sex that died at certain 
stated periods of life, in each town and division of the Slate; also the 
population of every town and division, with the percentage of deaths to 
population 12-17 

Table VII. Causes of death and season, in 1896, arranged alphabetically ; 
showing the number of decedents of each sex from each cause, in each 
month and in the whole year, the number of native born and foreign 
born, and also the number of native and of foreign parentage for the 
whole year 18-30 

Table VIII. Causes of death and age; arranged alphabetically, and 
showing the number of decedents of each sex from each cause, in each 
period of life 81-43 

Table IX. Classification and percentage; showing the number and per- 
centage of deaths from each cause and in each class of causes, in the 
whole State, and in each division of the State 44-53 

Table X. Nosological classification of causes of death in Rhode Island, 

in each of the forty-four years, 1858-1896 54-69 



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vi FORTY-FOURTH REGISTRATION REPORT. [1896. 

Table XI. Occupations and ages at death ; showing the number and the 
Aggregsiie and average age at death of the decedents, in each occupation 
and class of occupations, in the whole State, for 1896, and for 44 years 
and 7 months, ages under 20 omitted 70-80 

Table XII. Occupations and causes of death; showing the number in 
each occupation and class of occupations, who died from each specified 
cause, during 1896, omitting ages under 20 81-95 

Table XII. Supplementary 96-97 

Special Tables, Results and Comments. 

Births, Marriages and Deaths. Tables XIII-XVI 101-110 

Diagram I. Birth Rates 112-113 

Births. Special Results. Tables XVII-XXX 115-132 

Markiages. Special Results. Tables XXXl-XLIII 1 83-147 

Divorces. Tables XLIV-XLV 148-152 

Ratio of, to Marriage, different States. Table XLVI 153 

Deaths. Special Results. Tables XLVII-XC V 154-257 

Diagram II. Death Rates 170-171 

III. •• •* 259 

Returns of the Medical Examiners 261-264 

Nomenclature of Diseases. Appendix 265-276 

Suggestions Concerning Physicians' Certificates of Death 267-270 

Laws in Relation to Vital Statistics 277 

Synopsis of the Law of Marriage 282 

Laws in Relation to Divorce 284-286 

" " " " Medical Examiners and Coroners. . 286-291 

Index 293 



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REPORT UPON THE REGISTRATION 



Births, Marriages and Deaths 



RHODE ISLAND, 



YEAR ENDING DECEMBER 31, 1896, 



FOR VARIOUS YEARS FROM 1853 TO 1896, INCLUSIVE. 



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FORTY-FOURTH REGISTRATION REPORT. 



[1896. 



Table I. 

General Summary of Births and Marriages in the State of Rhode 
Island during the tjear 1806. 




Barrlni^ton 

Bristol 

Warren 

Bristol County 

Coventry 

East Greenwich 

West Greenwich 

Warwick 

Kent County 

Jamestown 

Little Compton 

Middletown 

Newport City 

New Shoreham 

Portsmouth 

Tiverton 

Newport County 

Burrillville 

Central Falls 

Cranston* 

Cumberland 

East Providence 

Foster 

Glocester 

Johnston 

Lincoln 

North Providence 

North Smithfleld 

Pawtucket 

Providence City 

Scituate 

Smithfield 

Woonsocket 

Providence County 

Charlestown 

Exeter 

Hopkinton 

Narragansett 

North Kingstown 

South Kinsrstown 

Richmond 

Westerly 

Washington County. . . . 



2 .... 
10 6' 6 
88' 1 8 

1 ....I.:.. 
1 

119 41 50 

537 lao 1^2 

... 1; 2 

3 2 3 

87 32 26 



2,669 


1,158 


907 


304 


300 


5 


4 




1 




8 


8 
27 








38 


1 


2 


8 


14 


10 


1 




3 


30 


27 


1 2 


1 


43 


86 


3 3 


1 


10 


9 


I 1 




66 


a5 


17| 9 


5 


209 


156 


22 


- 


13 



* state institutions not included. 



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1896.] 



BIRTHS, MARRIAGES AND DEATHS. 



Table I.— Continued. 

General Summary of Deaths in the State of Rhode Island during 

the year 1896. 



deaths. 





SEX. 


NATI 


VITY. 


Af 


res 
ren. 


Affgrepate Age 
in Years. 


Average Age 
in Years. 


i 




i 

a 














6 


1 


1 


00 


> 


1 


i 
1 


i 
1 




i 
1 


i 
1 


1 

a 


a> 


< 

1 

> 
< 


10 


14 


5 


12 


7 


14 


5 


603 


232 


43.07 


46.40 


885 


48.94 


141 


80 


61 


98 


48 


80 


61 


3,654 


2,345 


45.67 


38.44 


5,999 


42.55 


eo 


80 


30 


42 


18 


30 


80 


1,161 


998 


88.70 


38.27 


2,159 


85.98 


220 


124 


96 


147 


73 


124 


96 


5,418 


8,575 


43.69 


87.24 


8,993 


40.88 


116 


47 


69 


97 


19 


47 


69 


1,394 


2,197 


29.66 


81.84 


8,591 


30.95 


60 


26 


84 


48 


12 


26 


84 


1,231 


1,464 


47.84 


48.06 


2,695 


44.92 


10 


5 


5 


10 




5 


5 


897 


228 


79.40 


4S.00 


626 


62.. "VO 


397 


214 


183 


301 
456 


96 

127 


214 


183 


6,694 


5,420 


26.61 
29^ 


29.62 


11,114 


27.99 


588 


292 


291 


292 


291 


8,716 


9,809 


31.99 


18,025 


30.92 


8 


5 


8 


7 


1 


5 


8 


294 


18 


58.80 


6.00 


312 


39.00 


2'i 


9 


18 


20 


2 


9 


13 


551 


698 


61.22 


53.69 


1,249 


56.77 


JfO 


12 


8 


17 


8 


12 


8 


629 


430 


52.42 


53.75 


1,059 


51.18 


380 


184 


196 


286 


94 


184 


196 


5,929 


7,230 


32.22 


36.89 


13,159 


34.68 


S53 


19 


4 


21 


2 


19 


3 


922 


108 


48.53 


36.00 


1,030 


46.82 


29 


20 


9 


27 


2 


20 


9 


860 


J)65 


48.00 


40.55 


1,225 


42.24 


50 


24 


26 


89 


11 


24 


26 


748 


1.015 


30.96 


39.04 


1,758 


86.16 


532 


278 


259 


417 


115 


278 


258 


9,928 


9,864 


36.37 


88.08 


19,792 


87.27 


99 


58 


41 


64 


35 


58 


41 


2,280 


1,627 


39.31 


89.68 


3,907 


89.46 


827 


151 


176 


218 


109 


149 


176 


2,866 


4,829 


19.23 


27.44 


7,695 


23.08 


159 


87 


72 


184 


25 


87 


72 


2,613 


2,330 


30.08 


32.36 


4,943 


31.09 


168 


80 


88 


110 


58 


80 


88 


1,916 


2.763 


28.95 


31.40 


4,679 


27.85 


166 


60 


96 


130 


26 


60 


95 


2.207 


8,322 


86.78 


84.98 


5,529 


&>.67 


17 


8 


9 


17 




8 


9 


506 


525 


68.26 


58.83 


1,081 


60.65 


36 


16 


20 


82 


4 


16 


20 


846 


1,041 


52.88 


52.05 


1,887 


52.48 


S22 


112 


110 


158 


64 


111 


110 


3,268 


8,658 


29.44 


83.25 


6,926 


31.20 


128 


80 


43 


76 


47 


80 


43 


1,457 


1,251 


18.21 


29.09 


2,708 


2^.02 


31 


17 


14 


27 


4 


17 


14 


599 


tee 


85.24 


24.00 


985 


E0.16 


54 


87 


17 


82 


22 


37 


17 


1,054 


377 


28.49 


22.18 


1,481 


26.50 


616 


289 


827 


891 


225 


288 


827 


8,828 


10,934 


28.98 


83.44 


19,262 


31.32 


2,957 


1,575 


1,382 


2,001 


956 


1,575 


1,382 


46,640 


46,996 


28.98 


34. as 


92,636 


81.33 


69 


27 


42 


62 


7 


27 


42 


1,337 


2,113 


49.52 


50.31 


8,4.')0 


60.00 


45 


17 


28 


83 


12 


17 


28 


718 


1,815 


42.23 


46.96 


2,088 


45.18 


529 


268 


261 


866 


163 


268 


261 


5,971 


6,803 


22.28 


24.15 


12,274 


23.20 


5,608 


2,882 


2,726 


3,851 


1,757 


2,878 


2,725 


81,606 


89,720 


28.36 


82.92 


171,826 


80.58 


22 


14 


8 


19 


3 


14 


8 


893 


477 


68.79 


59.68 


1,870 


62.27 


15 


5 


10 


15 




5 


10 


826 


629 


65.20 


62.90 


955 


63.67 


47 


28 


24 


44 


3 


23 


24 


1,263 


1,386 


54.91 


57.75 


2,649 


56.36 


20 


18 


7 


15 


5 


13 


7 


600 


286 


46.15 


40.86 


886 


44.80 


51 


21 


30 


45 


6 


21 


30 


886 


1,555 


42.19 


51.83 


2,441 


47.8(i 


94 


57 


87 


84 


10 


57 


87 


2,288 


l,5i)2 


89.18 


43.08 


3,825 


40.69 


18 


7 


11 


14 


4 


7 


11 


386 


563 


55.14 


51.18 


J»49 


52.72 


115 


57 


58 


92 


28 


57 


58 


1,781 


2,318 


81.25 


89.88 


4,094 


85.60 


382 


197 


185 


828 


54 


197 


185 


8,368 


8,801 


42.48 


47.57 


17.169 


44.95 



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FORTY-FOURTH REGISTRATION REPORT. 



[1896. 



Table I.— Continued. — (Recapitulation). 

General Summary of Births and Marriages in the State of Rhode 
Island during the year 1896, 





BIRTHS. 




MARRIAGES. 




1 


SEX. 


parentage. 


1 
i 

1 


NATIVITY. 


COUNTIES. 


, 


1 


i 

1 


1 


If 


II 
11 


1 


1 


1^ 


II 


Bristol 


888 
984 
774 

8,269 
490 


189 
456 

894 

4,217 

265 


144 

478 

880 

4,052 

285 


90' 14*2 


29 
98 
77 
796 
45 


22 

82 
80 
777 
86 


87 
158 
204 
2,669 
209 


46 
99 

128 

1,168 

166 


1 
16 11 


14 


Kent 


28v! 

294 

2,465 

801 


477 

828 

4,242 

108 


88 
48 
907 
22 


16 

16 

804 

18 


11 


Newport 


18 


Providence 


800 


Washington 


18 


State Instittitions 












8,42;S 


5,292 
















Whole State 


10,750 


5,461 


5,289 


1,089 


997 


8,327 


1,687 


1,021 


868 


856 



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1896.] 



BIRTHS, MARBIAGES AND DEATHS. 



Table I. — Continued. — (Recapitulation). 

General Summary cf Deaths in the State of Rhode Island^ by 
Counties, during the year 1896, 

deaths. 





BE 


X. 


NATl 


VITY. 


Ai 




Aggregate Ape 
in Years. 


Average Age 
in Years. 


i 




\k 












^ 






















< 


S 


jj 






















<D 


< 


55 


i 


1 


1 


1 


i 
1 


1 
1 


1 




1 
1^ 


1 
1 


< 


< 


220 


124 


96 


147 


73 


124 


96 


5,418 


8,575 


43.69 


87.24 


8,993 


40.88 


583 


292 


291 


456 


127 


292 


291 


8,716 


9,309 


29.85 


81.99 


18,025 


30.92 


582 


^ 


259 


417 


115 


278 


258 


9,928 


9,864 


86.87 


38.08 


19,792 


87.27 


5,608 


2,882 


2,726 


3,851 


1,757 


2,878 


2,725 


81,606 


89,720 


28.36 


32.92 


171,826 


80.58 


88-.i 


197 


185 


828 


54 


197 


185 


8,868 


8,801 


42.48 


47.57 


17,169 


44.95 


179 


106 


78 


95 


84 


106 


78 


5,409 


8,800 


51.08 


52.a5 


9,209 


51.45 


7,504 


8,874 


8,630 


5,294 


2,210 


3,870 


3,628 


119,445 


125,069 


80.86 


34.47 


244,514 


32.61 



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FORTY-FOURTH REGISTRATION REPORT. 



[1896. 



Table II.-BIRTHS, 1896. 
Arranged by Months^ Sexes, and Divisions of the State. 



MONTHS. 



January. 



February., 



March , 



April. 



May. 



June. 



July. 



Males . . 
Females 
Total... 



Males . . 
Females 
Total... 



SEX. 



Males . . 
Females 
Total... 



Males . . 
Females 
Total... 



Males . . 
Females 
Total... 



Males . . 
Females 
Total... 

Males . . 
Females 
Total... 



I 



413 

427 
840 



436 
407 
843 

465 
456 
921 

410 
413 
823 

416 
411 
827 

414 
397 
811 



DIVISIONS OF THE STATE. 



17 28 

10, 37 
27 65 



456 9 
4491 12 
905 21 



9 38 
12 28 
21 66 



l& 



o 

IS 



84 

65 

149 

55 

72 

127 

59 

89 

148 

66 

65 

131 

70 

73 

143 

72 

71 

143 

60 

68 

128 



S 



156 
171 

327 

176 
150 
326 

184 
161 
345 

161 
163 
324 

158 
151 
309 

155 
145 
300 

203 
177 
380 



35 



28 40 
19 32 

47 72 



^ 



^ 



35, 18 
30 16 
65 29 

42 19 

35' 23 
77 42 

41 27 
36 17 
77 44 



36 



22 
16 

38 

27 
18 
45 

21 
20 
41 

16 
21 
37 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



1896.] 



BIRTHS. 



Table II.— BIRTHS, 1896.— Continued. 









DIVISIONS OF THE STATE. 


MONTHS. 


SEX. 


6 
o 


1 


o 
o 

i4 


1 


1 
1 


1 
Is 

r 


o 

1 

1 


to 

1 


1 




1 

1 

1 


August 


Males 


464 


13 


33 


6 


31 


80 


168 


23 


45 


37 


28 




Females. . 


457 


13 


38 


11 


26 


81 


171 


19 


42 


31 


25 




Total 


921 


26 


71 


17 


57 


161 


339 


42 


87 


68 


53 


September 


Males 


510 


7 


52 


4 


26 


95 


202 


18 


43 


44 


19 




Females . . 


454 


9 


39 


3 


29 


75 


173 


24 


43 


36 


23 




Total 


964 


16 


91 


7 


55 


170 


375 


42 


86 


80 


42 


October 


Males 


510 


18 


40 


6 


34 


90 


205 


25 


43 


32 


17 




Females. . 


488 


13 


49 


15 


27 


72 


179 


28 


51 


30 


24 




Total 


998 


31 


89 


21 


61 


162 


384 


53 


94 


62 


41 


November 


Males 


445 


9 


42 


8 


27 


70 


162 


25 


39 


40 


23 




Females. . 


481 


14 


48 


3 


27 


69 


197 


33 


48 


27 


15 




Total 


926' 23 


90 


11 


54 


139 


359 


58 


87 


67 


38 


December 


Males 


1 
522 18 


60 


13 


38 


85 


192 


26 


29 


38 


23 




Females . . 


449; 15| 45 


6 


24 


77 


168 


20 


43! 34 


17 




Total 


971 


33 


105 


19 


62 


162 


360 


46 


72 72 


40 


Whole Year... 


Males 


5,461 


139 


456 


83 


311 


886 


2,122 


287 


1 

1 

459,463 


255 




Females.. 


5,289 


144478 


84 


296 


877 


2,006 289 


479 401 


235 




Total 


10,750 283 934 


167 


607 


1,763 


4,128576 


938 


864 


4yo 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



FORTY-FOURTH REGISTRATION REPORT. 



[1896. 



CO 
00 



W 
H 
« 

H 
P 



I 



PS 

2 



PC4 

o 

w 

O 

n 

P 
JZ5 



i 

O 

QD 
O 



»— 1 2 







• 




— 














rH 




uaq^oK uBuuao 








1-H 








1-H 




















• iH 


rH 




•aaq^oK uBoiaaiuv 
•jaq^Bj qspi 


• 




1-S 


: ^ 


(M 


\ rH CO 




•4aq;ow qs|Jl 
•jaq^uj qsil^fua 










1-H 










'^ 




-asq^OK OBDi-iaiuv 
•aaqiB^ qsiiifua 








1-H 










1-S 


1 ^ 




•J9q;oK uwo|J9aiv 
•aaq^B^ ubi^ioji 


• 

• 1-H 
















i "^' 


e 


•aaqjow q«iJl 


• 










^H 






1 '^' 


i4 


•jaqiow: UBi)i4»uiv 




1-H 
1-H 






1-H 


<^ 


• • 


1 "^1 


H 

Em 

O 

t 

> 


•jaq^ojv qo;().)S 
•jaq^lB^ UBO|.iauiv 








- 


-■ 


- — 


i "' 


•aoqioK qniJI 
•j^qiBji UBOj.iaiuv 


• 




1-N 




(M 


i- 


•joq^ow il«!i:<(»a 
•joqiB,*! iiBouamv 

^aaqioK^aui V W\ 
■.idq^B,4 aBOjjaiuv 


1-H 


: ^ 


- 




1-H 




'/\ 


•qsjpoAVS 

•UBISSIIH 


1-S 


— 


1-1 : 1 <=^ 




•9S3nan;joj 








: '" 


: "^ 1 ^^ 




•qsiioci 










f^ 




1^1 




•UBJIB^I 

•qsiJI 


• rH 1-H 
rH rH f^ 1-H 


iH 


: ^ 


: ^ 


"*-• 


1 '"' 




iH 


: ^ 




<M <?5 


1 ^\ 




-uBinaaf) 




c^ 




\ 




i ^~^ 




•qsnsua 

UBipBUBO qouaj^ 


• 1-H 


T^ 






Cv 


1-H 

«"' "j CO 


1 '^i 

1 c^ . 

1 1-H 




•uBoijaoiv qsWJtf 


1-H <M 1-H 

CO ~C^~Tcr' CO ' cc 










uBojjaiuv 


) CO 1-H O "^ G^ 


' -^ "1 s, 



i 



c 



m 

n 

o ! 

SS I, 

« 'I 



•X:|unoo uoiifuiqsBAV | ! ^ 



1-1 Ci Ci ,-H 



+-X^UnoO 90U9PIAOJJ I "^ 



(M lO »0 '•^ 1-H 



-^ 1-H rH »0 



»0 
CO 



rH I oa I 



bo 



•iC^iO iJodMaK I 



*A^unooaJOClA\dK I 



•^-junoo ^U9H I 



•i£;unoo unsiJa 



•U9jpiiqo JO jaquinK 

QQ 



-H CO rH 



rH I CO 



5^ 



I 2 



I OOO 0:0S 500 «OW l-t- ' 



<cs CC35 1-1 ^ ec»o 1 



li|l|l|i|i|i|i|i|a|i|l|i|i 

Is sS li; a£ Is a£ l£ IS sS s£ s£ l£ l£ 



•898B0 JO jaqraiiK 



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rH rH rH rH rH I i-H 

I rH 



OQ 

o 



s § ^ : •: •: : ^ 1 1 1 1 "^ 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



1896.] MAHRIAGES. 

Table IV.— MARRIAGES, 1896. 
Arranged by Months and Divisions of the State. 



MONTHS. 



January 

February 

March 

First Quarter. . . 

April 

May. 

June 

Second Quarter. . 

July 

August 

September 

Third Quarter... 

October 

November 

December 

Fourth Quarter.. 

Whole Year 

8 



^ 



286 
276 
128 
690 

368 

213 

423 

1,004 

220 
246 
307 
773 

313 
355 
192 
860 



DIVISIONS OF THE STATE. 



3,327 



16 

15 

6 

37 



8; 19 

4" 10 

6' 20 

I 

18; 49 

! 

8 7 

9: 16 

8 12 



35 

11 
14 
12 
37 



I 
87|l58 






4 
2 
2 

8 

3 
1 
5 
9 

2 

5 

4 

11 

6 
12 

1 
19 



47 



12 

18 

2 

32 

12 

5 

16 

33 

11 
10 
23 
44 

19 
23 

6 
48 



157 



C3 
O 

ll 

i 

t 



33 

28 
16 

77 

39 

25 

52 

116 

25 
32 
36 
93 

36 

43 

24 

103 



389 



8 

6 

6 

20 

15 
16 
24 
55 



20 
30 
16 
66 

42 

29 

61 

132 



6 20 

13: 18 

6 31 

251 69 



36 
28 
22 
86 



125 353 



144 
138 

58 
340 

188 

88 

197 

473 

116 
110 
150 
376 

142 

167 

90 

399 



1,588 



28 

21 

3 

52 

21 
23 
18 
62 

15 
15 
22 
52 

20 

19 

9 

48 



14 
13 
16 
43 

21I 

12 
2i 
57 

10 

i 

431 

I 
21j 

251 

20| 

66' 



as 



O 



253 
284 
124 
661 

310 
213 
404 
927 

229 
234 
356 
819 

435 

442 

213 

1,090 



2l4i209i3,497 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



10 



FORTY-FOURTH REGISTRATION REPORT. 



[1896. 



Table V.— DEATHS, 1896. 
Arranged by Months^ Sexes, and Divisions of the State, 



MONTHS. 



January. 



February. 



March . 



April. 



May. 



June. 



July. 



SEX. 



Males. , 

Females 

Total. 



Males. 

Females 

Total. 



Males. . 

iFemales 

Total. 



Males. 

Females 

Total. 



Males. 

Females 
Total. . . 



Males. 

Females 

Total. 



Males. . 

Females 

Total. 



1 

GO 






DIVISIONS OF THE STATE. 



•" OB 

fg 
go 

V 



332 


15 


20 


9 


285 


8 19 


4 


617 


23 


39 


13 


321 


11 


27 


11 


260 


7 


20 


7 


581 


18 


47 


18 


325 


11 


21 


5 


310 


12 


26 


7 


635 


23 


47 


12 


309 


9 


17 


8 


325 


7 


18 


2 


634 


16 


35 


10 


323 


4 


21 


5 


303 


5 


18 


3 


626 


9 


39 


8 


306 


12 


23 


5 


290 


5 


19 


6 


696 


17 


42 


11 


425 


5 


33 


11 


411 


10 


27 


12 


836 


15 


60 


23 



11 

13 
24 



11 
20 
31 



16 
16 
32 



12 
19 
31 



15 
10 
25 



20 
12 
32 



49 
46 
95 



56 
33 



44 

56 

100 



51 

60 

111 



42 
46 

88 



61 

70 

131 



15 46, 17 
12 40 19 
27 86 36 



36 

441 69 



24 

18 
42 



16 
18 
34 



14 
24 
38 



17 
20 
37 



28 
21 
49 



25 
30 
55 



53 

52 

105 



6 

5 

11 



22 
11 
33 



20 11 
20 3 
40 14 



21 
20 
41 



18 
10 
28 



12 

9 

21 



9 

3 

12 



10 

7 

17 



9 

7 

16 



T ^j; il Ml ■■ Ui ' < 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



1896.] 



DSATHS. 



11 



Table V.— DEATHS, 1896.— Continued. 









DIVISIONS OF THE STATE. 










1 




^ 










>* 

a 




MONTHS. 


SEX. 




>k 




^ 




i 






>% 




i 


1 






1 




f 


i? 
C 
t 


S o 






6 


1 




1 






i 


1 


M 


1? 
11 


37 


1 


\_ 


1 


i 


1 


1 


1 


August 


Males... 


407 


18 


24 


66 


17 


32 


141 


27 


23 


11 




Females 


403 


8 


39 


13 


28 


53 


5 


41 


164 


19 


20 


13 




Total. . . 


810 


26 


63 


24 


65 


119 


22 


73 


305 


46 


43 


24 


September 


Males. . . 


287 


6 


25 


7 


14 


42 


17 


19 


118 


14 


11 


14 




Females 


279 


12 


26 


2 


22 


58 


5 


29 


87 


16 


16 


6 




Total. . . 


566 


18 


51 


9 


36 


100 


22 


48 


205 


30 


27 


20 


October 


Males. . . 


290 


14 


23 


6 


12 


52 


8 


19 


113 


25 


10 


8 




Females 


266 


7 


28 


3 


14 


28 


15 


25 


96 


18 


19 


13 




Total. . . 


556 


21 


51 


9 


26 


80 


23 


44 


209 


43 


29 


21 


November. . . 


Males. . . 


247 


7 


23 


4 


10 


33 


7 


16 


122 


10 


11 


4 




Females 


239 


9 


20 


2 


11 


45 


13 


17 


93 


11 


15 


3 




Total. . . 


486 


16 


43 


6 


21 


78 


20 


33 


215 


21 


26 


7 


December 


Males. . . 


302 


12 


35 


7 


11 


57 


9 


25 


120 


15 


6 


5 




Females 


259 


6 


31 


2 


19 


45 


6 


18 


103 


14 


13 


2 




Total. . . 


661 


18 


66 


9 


30 


102 


15 


43 


223 


29 


19 


7 


Whole Year.. 


Males. . . 


3,874 


124 


292 


89 


184 


599 


151 


289 


1,575 


268 


197 


106 




Females 


3,630 


96 


291 


63 


196 


580 


176 


327 


1,382;261 


185 


73 




Total. . . 


7,504 


220 


583152 


380 


1,179 327 


616 


2,957 529:382 


179 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



12 



f ORTY-FOttRTH REGISl^RATlON RfifOR'T. 



[1896. 



Table VI.— DEATHS, 1896. 

Exhibiting the Whole Number, the Proportion to Popukdion, the 

Number of each Sex^ and the Number in each Period of 

LifCy in every Town and Division of the State. 





03 


* 


§g 


DEATHS. 


{ 






TOWNS 


« 


a 






o • 






AND DIVISIONS OF THE 


Q 


it. 






® M 

11 


t: 






STATE. 


1 


1 


Death 
of po 


SEX. 


1 


2 


e5 

2 


Barrington 


19 


1,696 


11.2 Males 


14 


23; 8 


2 










Females. . . 


5 


ir 6 




Bristol 


141 


6,831 


20.6 Males 


80 


12 2 










I Females. . . 


61 


9 2 




Warren 


60 


3,786 


15.8 Males. 

Females. . . 


1 30 
1 30 


7 1 
5 4 








Bristol County. . . 


220 


12,313 


17.9 Males 


1 124 


22' 3 










Females. . . 


96 


15, 6 




Coventry 


116 


5.080 


22.8 Males 


47 


121 5 








' 


1 Females. . . 


69 


20l 1 


3 


East Greenwich. . . 


60 


3,137 


19.1 Males 


26 


7... 












Females. . . 


34 


5 


1 




West Greenwich. . . 


10 
397 


706 
22,125 


14.2 


Males 

Females. . . 


5 

5 

214 

183 










1 

77 
57 






Warwick 


17. 9; Males..... 
1 Females. . . 


13 

2 






6 


Kent County 


583 


31,048 


18.8. Males 


292 


96 


18 


2 








Females. . . 


291 


83 


4 


9 


Jamestown 


8 


851 


9. 4' Males 


5 


1 














Females. . . 


3 


2 






Little Compton 


22 


1,116 


19.7 


Males 

Females. . . 


9 
13 


1 
1 








2 




Middletown 


20 


1,439 


13.9 


Males 

Females. . . 


12 

8 


2 

2 




... 


Newport City 


380 


21,734 


17.5 


Males 


184 


42 


11 


2 










Females. . . 


196 


43 


5 


2 


New Shoreham .... 


23 


1,302 


17.7 


Males 

Females... 


19 
4 


3 

1 


2 


... 


Portsmouth 


29 
50 


1,815 
2,990 


16.0 
16.7 


Males 

Females. . . 

Males 

Females . . 


20 

9 

24 

26 


7 

2 

10 

4 












Tiverton. 


""5 








Newport County . . 


532 


31,247 


17.0 


Males 


273 


66! 13 


2 










Females. . . 


259 


55 


12 


2 


Burrillville 


99 


5,729 


17.3 


Males 


58 


14 


5 












Females. . . 


41 


6 


2 




Central Falls 


327 


16,354 


19.9 


Males 


151 


60 


9 


11 










Females . . 


176 


37 


12 


11 


Cranston 


159 


9,388 


16.9 


Males 


87 


25 


4 


1 










Females. . . 


72 


19 


3 


2 



* Geometrically estimated. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



1896.] 



TIEATBS. 



13 



Tam<e Vr.— deaths, 1896.— Continued; 



00 


»6 

a 


d 

2 
to 


s 


2 


2 


2 


2 


2 


2 
8 


2 


2 


i 

1 


1 
< 


1 


2 
2 
2 

1 
.... 

2 
2 
2 
2 


3 
2 
2 

1 
1 
1 
3 
2 


1 

4 

"*3 

1 
1 
2 
4 

"3 


1 

6 
3 
6 

* 4 
6 
2 
3 


1 
1 
2 
1 
1 
3 
4 
5 
2 
4 


6 
9 
4 
7 
2 
2 
6 
9 
6 
3 
2 
4 


1 
6 
5 
5 
1 
1 
7 
6 
2 
5 
2 
2 


2 
2 

13 
3 
2 
3 

17 
8 
5 
6 
3 
3 


23 

11 

20 

10 

3 

1 

23 

11 

5 

7 

3 

5 

1 

1 

28 

19 

32 

32 

2 


3 
9 
7 
6 
6 
3 

16 

9 

2 

3 

6 

8 

2 

1 

11 

14 

21 

21 

1 


2 
1 
6 
4 
3 
4 
11 
9 
3 
8 
1 
5 
1 
1 
9 
9 

14 

23 

1 






2 






"2 
1 












1 
2 






1 














1 




1 





3 














15 

7 

16 

10 
















1 
3 
1 
4 


2 
2 
4 
5 


5 
5 
6 
9 


11 
14 


12 

7 

14 
14 


7 
17 
15 
24 


12 
14 
16 
21 


16 

8 

24 

16 


8 
2 
5 
2 










































3 
4 

1 

1 

15 

19 

2 


2 
2 
3 
3 
20 
13 
5 
1 
2 


1 
1 
2 

"5 

17 

2 


















1 
1 


1 
2 






























1 
18 
21 

1 






8 


2 

2 








14 
16 


22 
16 


16 

28 

4 




3 
















1 

"3 

1 

17 

18 

2 

4 

9 

21 

6 

4 














.... 


1 

1 

1 

' 3 

21 

26 

3 

6 

9 

16 
7 
6 


1 
.... 

24 
18 
1 
4 
6 
11 
6 
4 


1 
1 
2 
8 
25 
28 
4 
2 

10 

15 

8 

8 


1 


5 
2 
2 
6 

18 
26 
7 
2 
8 
5 












# 1 








4 
1 
28 
25 
6 
6 
9 

16 
8 
3 


1 

1 

84 

20 

11 

6 

7 

9 

10 
7 














8 
3 
1 


2 

2 

.... 

1 
2 
2 

1 


5 

8 
3 

1 
7 
1 
7 
5 


6 

1 ^ 






1 






7 
6 


3 


"ii 





2 


2 








2 


1 





Digitized by VjOOQIC 



u 



^PORTir-tOUMfl ftEGlSfRATlON REPOBT. 

Table VL— DEATHS, 1896.— Continued. 



[1896. 



TOWNS 

AND DITISIONB OT THX 
8TATB. 



Camberland 

East Providence . . . 

Foster 

Glocester 

Johnston 

Lincoln 

North Providence. . 
North SmithGeid. . . 

Pawtuoket 

Providence City . . 

Sciluate 

Smithfield 

woonsocket 

Providence County 

CharlestowD 

Exeter 

Hopkinton 

Narragansett. 

North Kingstown . . 
South Kingstown. . 

Richmond 

Westerly 

Washington Co... 
State Institutions.. 



5 



4SS 

I 



168 

156 

17 

36 

222 

123 

31 

54 

616 

2,957 

69 

45 

529 

5,608 

22 

15 

47 

20 

51 

94 

18 

115 

382 

179 



8,644 

10,572 
1,169 
1,636 

11,683 
8,626 
2,561 
2,800 

33,704 

148,334 

3,519 

2,337 

25,466 

292,522 

977 

901 

2,703 

1,264 

4,469 

5,239 

1,645 

7,774 

24,972 
1,789 



&I 



a 



deaths. 



sex 



If I 



o 



CO 

s 



19. 
14. 
14, 
22 
19, 
14, 
12, 
19, 
18, 
19, 
19, 
19. 
20, 
19, 
22, 
16, 
17, 
15 
11 
17, 
10 
14 
15. 
100. 



4! Males i 

Females. 

Males. . . 

Females. 

Males.. . 

Females. 

Males. . . 

Females. 

Males. . . 

Females. 
3 1 Males... 

Females. 

Males. . . 

Females. 

Males. . . 

Females. 

Males. . . 

Females. 

Males. . . 

Females. 

Males. . . 

Females. 

Males. . . 

Females. 

Males. . . 

Females. 

Males. . . 

Females. 

Males. . . 

Females. 

Males. . . 

Females. 

Males.. . 

Females. 

Males. . . 

Females. 

Males. . . 

Females. 

Males. . . 

Females. 

Males.. . 

Females. 

Males. . . 

Females. 

Males. . . 

Females. 

Males. . . 

Females. 



80; 26 



61 3 



88 

60 

96 

8 

9 

16 

20 

112 

110 

80 

43 

17 

14 

37 

17 

289 

327 

1,575 

1,382 

27 

42 

17 

28 

268 

261 

2,882 

2,726 

14 

8 

5 

10; 

23 

24 

13 

7 

21 

30 

57 

37 

7 

11 

57 

58 

197 

.185 

106 

73 



20 

17 

19 

1 



1 

1 

35 

25 

36 

10 

8 

5 

12 

5 

84 

80 

394 

266 

1 

2 

4 

5 

116 

99 

829 

599 



4 

1 

13 

12 

79 

75 

2 

1 



12 

19 

150 

139 



4 
1 
3 
2 



7 

9 

44 

34 

"3 

"i 

12 
10 
87 
79 



1 



1 
2 
1 
2 
1 
3 
7 
11 
4 

*i' 

16 
12 
34 

28 

I 



3 

1 



1 
1 
6 
2 



2 
2 
4 
3 



♦Geometrically estimated. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



1896.] 



DEATHS. 



15 



Table VI.— DEATHS, 1896.— Continued. 

























! 


1 


. 


«ft 





40 


^ 


S ^ 


S 


S 


g 


S 


8 



•0 





s 


3 


3 


S 


2 


2 2 


s 


2 


S 


2 


2 


s 


< 


00 


•^ 


lO" 





lA 


S S 




S 


2 


g 


S 


s 


2 


2 


1 


1 


1 


111 3 


4 


4 


8 


7 


1 






2 




4 


1 


3 


7; 7 


7 


9 


9 


7 


4 










2 

5 


1 
3 


2 
3 


2 2 

4I 10 


1 
11 


6 
8 


10 
5 


9 
15 


3 
2 


1 

2 


















. 


' 


1 


"2 
2 


3 
1 
1 
2 
12 


1 
2 
4 

1 
4 


1 
2 
3 
4 
8 


1 














1 
1 














1 
1 
2 


1 


"i 

1 
5 








1 


.... 
"2 


4 

81 4 


2 






2 






4 


4 


2 


4 


9l 12 


11 


9 


7 


9 


6 


1 






2 


1 




2 


9 5 


3 


3 


3 


4 


1 


1 






2 
"2 


1 
1 





2 


7i 1 


2 
2 

1 

1 

2 

21 


3 
2 
1 
2 
2 
27 


4 
1 
1 
3 
1 
34 


4 
3 
2 
6 


' 








3 



1 












■ 








1 






4i 2 
2 1 


1 










1 
6 






9 


10 


8 


22 


20 


18 


""4 


4 




3 


2 


11 




11 


18 


32 


36 


27 


34 


34 


11 


3 




31 


27 


62 


27 


49 


158 


152 


119 


150 


138 


103 


46 


6 




41 


20 


39 


17 


48 


127 


122 


131 


120 


149 


109 


71 


13 




• • • • 


1 


1 






2 


1 




3 


7 


7 


1 
















5 
2 
5 


2 

1 

.... 


2 

3 

1 


' 4 
1 
3 


8 
2 
1 


5 
3 
7 


7 
1 
3 


1 
.... 
























2 


5 


8 


5 




9 


18 


21 


10 


22 


13 


10 


1 




5 


3 


8 


2 




20 


15 


8 


18 


17 


19 


10 


4 




62 


52 


92 


41 


67 


248 


229 


195 


244 


267 


210 


90 


15 


4 


67 


37 


80 


37 


90 


238 

1 


230 


232 

1 
1 
1 
2 
2 


234 
2 
1 
1 

3 


264 
4 
2 

1 
1 
4 


236 
6 
1 
2 
3 
5 


135 


28 


1 












2 





































2 

3 










2 






1 






. • . . 




• ■ • • 








2 


4 


3 


2 


7 


2 
















2 

1 
3 
1 
1 
5 
1 
2 
4 


"2 

1 
2 
3 

1 


2 

1 
2 
2 

I 


2 


3 


1 
2 
4 
6 
7 
5 
4 
2 
7 


1 





















1 


1 






1 
2 
7 
4 


1 
2 
6 
6 
1 
3 
3 


3 
6 
6 
4 


"2 
















3 

1 












3 




















1 
4 


""2 


1 
5 


1 
4 











5 




2 












3 


8 


2 


1 


5 


6 


12 


4 








2 


11 




2 


13 


8 


16 


21 


23 


36 


17 










1 


3 


7 


17 


10 


13 


16 


21 


38 


21 


5 












4 
4 


10 
5 


13 
10 


18 
5 


17 
14 


13 
11 


24 
12 


2 

7 


2 

1 




.... 




.... 


.... 


• • • f 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



16 



FOBTT-FOITBTH BEQISTBATION REPOBT. 



[1896. 



Tabm: VI— Continued. DEATHS, 1896. (Recapitulation.) 





1 
1 


1 

1 




deaths. 

• 


! 


5 




DIVISIONS 

OP 
THE STATE. 


Deaths per 1,000 ol 
Popnlation. 


SEX. 




00 
S 


Bristol County . . . 


220 


12,313 


17.9' Males... 
Females. 


124 
96 


22 

16 


8 
6 


2 

1 


Kent Codnty 


583 


31,048 


18.8 Males... 
Females . 


292 
291 


96 
83 


18 
4 


2 
9 


Newport County.. 


532 


31,247 


17.0 


Males. . . 
Females. 


273 

269 


66 
55 


13 
12 


2 
2 


Providence County 


6,608 


292,522 


19.2 


Males... 
Females . 


2,882 
2,726 


829 
699 


150 
139 


87 
79 


Washington Co.. . 


382 


24,972 


15.3 


Males . . . 
Females . 


197 

185 


34 

28 


5 
2 


4 
3 


State Institutions . 


179 


1,789 


100.1 


Males... 


106 
78 


3 
3 








Females. 






Whole State 


7,504 


393,891 


19.1 


Males.. . 
Females. 


3,874 
3,630 


1,050 
783 


189 
163 


9^ 
94 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



1896.] 



DEATHS. 



17 



Table VI— Continnecl. DEATHS, 1896. (Recapitulation.) 



62 
67 



70 
76 







d 

s 


id 

s 

o 



52 
37 



62 

46 



16 
10 



92 

80 



11 

1 



127 
101 



41 
37 



9 
14 



67 
90 



55 93 
55 128 



14 
14 



17 
18 



248 
238 



13 

17 



10 
5 



306 
297 



^ 


g 


B 


o 


g 


5 

7 


6 


9 


6 


15 


16 


24 


21 


21 


24 


26 


18 


229 


195 


230 


232 


8 


16 


10 


13 


13 


18 


10 


5 


292 


276 


309 


295 











i 


1 


S 


g 


S 


S 


•d 


t 


o 


S 


B 


B 


§ 


8» 


g 


S 


g 


S 


s 


< 


17 


23 


16 


11 


1 




8 


11 


9 


9 


1 




24 


32 


21 


14 


5 




16 


32 


21 


23 


2 





25 


28 


34 


18 


2 




28 


25 


20 


26 


7 


1 


244 


267 


210 


90 


15 


4 


234 


264 


236 


135 


28 


1 


21 


23 


36 


17 


1 




16 


21 


38 


21 


5 





17 


13 


24 


2 


2 




14 


11 


12 


7 


1 





348 


386 


341 


152 


26 


4 


316 


364 


336 


221 


44 


2 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



18 



FORTY-FOURTH REGISTRATION REPORT. 



[1896. 






•lYiOX 






s 


^ 


^OO^ • ..^OO ^ . .<M*^(N .•^»-iG^C^l>- • 


H 

GO 


^ 


. • . . . . fnq 




Digitized by VjOOQIC 



1896.] 



CAUSES OF DEATH. 



19 



1V10X 


'^ 


i>- 


ifiOJ^DS^ri^QOS^t^O'^OOCOCOCOO'-' 
3^1 CO "^ T^ CO CO 


O O rh CO 3<l O 
CO ^ ^ 


i 

OD 


p=; 


. ^ lO t^ ^ ' CO t> 'CO . -H ^ . (N . ©< . ^ Ut) -. 00 o 


;^ 


1-H CO eo CO CO cN (N 


1' 


1 


^iO'<(fiOTH<MCOCO'N'^u:)(M(NO^(M(M-^COCOrJ*00»OCO 
^ <N CO CO CO (M G^ 




•©^^"Tt<(M .^»0 -CO •5^^;DC^i-'00 -C^lt^ .»<0 1>-SO 


> 


1 


•-•»0'^;D(M»-i©fl"^ -OCO 'rHO •(N^-HG^QO'^OO'^Ck'5 
1-H C^ • CO • 5^ • i-H ^ 


a 




'N-«CO'**<^«^'^(Ml^<N'^t^;D0Oi-H'^ 


CO G^ 

T-H 


. o 00 CO 

■ ^H 


8 
a 


fe' 




• 1-H -^ 1-H 1-H • C^ f-l 












; ; 


, , 


. »-^ . 


!N 




• tH *-< G^ 


f-H 


»H 










T-H 


^ (N 


^^ 1-H 


: : '^ ^ 


1 


^ 






. (M . 






CO 






















■T-H • . 


;^ 






: : ^ 






(M 




^H 




CO 




"HH 1-1 






• 1-H -H 


i 








CO • 




t-H . 




; 
















• 1-H T-H . 






• 1-H 


<-H 


O 




»-H 


^ <M 




(M 




(M -H 




i 


pc; 






1-H ^H 






^H 
















^ ! 


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a 






• . 1-H 






'^ 


2^ 




^ ^ 




<N 




(N • 


• * 




p=; 






•CO 






(N 


t-H 

f-H 








(N 




• ^H 


•■H 


pc; 






^ t^ ^ 




CO 




^ CO 




fH 




CO • -H 


^ 








• • ; 






»-H 


-^ 








(nT 


— 


CO 

"co^ 


I 




^ 






•<N 




^H rH 1-H (N 




^ l>. 




^ 




i 


Pm 






(N . 






1-H 


1-H 








"g^~~ 




»-H 


- 


<N 




1^ 






. .CO ^ 




(M 


^ 




^ CO 




^ ?D 


• 




1 


^ 






• ^H «-H 






i-< 
















• 


f^ (N 


• 




»-H 


(N CO 






-^ 






»-H 1-H 




GO ' 




(M 


f-l . . 


i 






• • 






^ 








i-H • 1-H 








- 


^ 3S| • 


)^' 






i-H CO 






^H 




*-H 


. CO '-H -H (N . 




•^ 


! ; '^ 


1 








1-H 






(M 








• ; • 




^ ! 


(M -H . 






(N .-H . 






"* 






^ ^ CN . . 


^ ; 


. CO T^ . 




C^ 


1 


p^; 






• "^ 






1-H 






^H 


: '^ : 




"(JN 


(N 








• 






G^ • t>- 






^ . 




t-H . 


(M 


; 


^ , 








I 


1 






1-H • 






CO 






• ■ 


• 


! 












1-H . 1 


;^ 






CO ^ CO • 




! 


1-H 




f^ 


^^ 


^H . 








•■H 


- 


i 

c 


H 
(J 

H 

3 


b 
*^ 

s 

i 

g 

I 
< 


C 

c 

1 

u 
a 

1 


■ 
OQ 

a 
u 

a 


bi 

s 


c 
a 

p5 


s 

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> 
a 


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^ 

> 
^ 




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1 

c 

M 


> 

Qi 

a 

1 


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• c 

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g 

c 


1 


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1.2 

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ll 


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si 


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Digitized by VjOOQIC 



20 



FORTY-FOURTH REGISTRATION REPORT. 



[1896. 





a 

•4.3 

a 
o 



CO 
00 



w 

ft 
o 

GfQ 

5 

I 



I 



IViOJ, 


Ci "^ 0> QO Oi 3S 




eot>ot>-oiOi-i<or»i- 

CO •^ CO CO -^ '^ 




rH 


t^ 


l-< 


f^ 


CO 






f^ 


O X CO Oi CO ^ cc 


• »o CO CO 1^ 'O CO • T»« i>- • • -co ' ^ ^ 

• — ^ •^ : '^ : • : 




JS 


CO O CO Oi CO ^ «c 


•^00»^1>»OCO'^-^G^ 
*-< CM CM 


. ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ -CM 




Pi 


u ch i>- o~'-^i^^ cT^ — ~« 


i>- a> CO r» -^ c^ 


CO . .-• ,-^ ^ .^ "TCM 




c O l^ Ci 1^ (N — O . CM ^ 


COXCOCO .-^^-i-i CO • — »- 

00 ^ -co • • 






1 


1 -^gS^ :- 


J5 


> *- cs 


— I'-CMOOCM^CMCO • .^-^-^ -^ 
CO •^ ^ . . 






•^ 


to »r: 

QO — 


l^ Ji — 




CO 


CO CO lO r-^ ao 

O CM 
CM 


^ ^ ^ ^ 

CO 


CO 


^ CM 




1 


fe 




CO 


•^ 


• t^ 




. . •^ 


CM ^ 




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:" 








^ 


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; ; ^ 


- ~ - 


v-N 


— ; 


; ; ^ 




'- ; 










^ 
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P(^ 


: °^ 


^^ ^^ 




! •" 


to ^ ^ 


— CO 


— 


- 






"- 




'^ 


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• «^ 




1-M 


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^ ^ 


CO 


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^ 






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■ — 00 






CM 














^ 




— CO «*"' 




CO 


^ . ^ ^ ^ 


.- 




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^ . 






-^ 


— ;- 




f 




^ 


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CO~^i~ 


CO • 


.- 










*- 00 M -• 


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^ 

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'^ 


CO • " 










^ 




• • 


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CM 


- 


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t 


^ 
^ 




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<N 


^ 


0~ • CM 


^ 


CO 






*- 










^ rj* -H 


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; 


-- 


CO ~" 




- 


— 








s 

d 


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'^ 


. 


^ 


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CM ^ 


O CM 


; 


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~'^~: 




^ 


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05 


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CM 


-- 


— 


"3M~~ 


— 


; 














t; 1 fc 


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3^ CO 




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1 




CM 


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CM . 
















^ 


si 


t^ t^ 




CM 


_____ 




O 










— 
















! "^ 




— CM CO 

~- oc"-^ 








CO 












. O ^ 
• »0 — -N 






CM f-^ O 














^ 












• • CM .-^ • »r: fo 






^ • 






; 








(M «) • • 




• 


--' 


CO ^ CM 




- 


; 














1 


»-^ X 


5M #-H . 


cc 






— CM 
CM 




CO 
















^ cc 




^-( 




)2 
CM 


w^ 


•^ 


; • 
















1 


f^ 






^ 


«-H .—1 






CM »Q 
















•a 


CO kO • 


CO -• 






CO 


CM -H ^ 


•-H 














f-H 




E- 
■< 
ft 

c 


i 


s 

p-l 

a 

a 
< 


GC 

'S 

> 

a 

03 

> 
X 
a> 


DO 

Q 


08 

a 

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< 


E 

c 

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a 

c 

pi 

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< 


a 
a 

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i 

a 
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s 

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c 

1- 
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1; 
o 


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2 

PQ 


a 

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B 

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1 


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PQQ 


a 
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8 


a 

s 
a 

o 

3 













Digitized by VjOOQIC 



1896.] 



CAUSES OF DEATH. 



21 



•IViOJ, 




^ o f^ 




(N 




G<1 


»c 


-N 


.-H 


^H 


Oi Ci ri< -N 
CO 




O GO <N 




C<l 


^H 


(M 


oi 


i 

en 






•^ — GO -t-ii-iiOu^Ssi . -i-iCOCN^ • • • '(M 

T-H • • . , . , 


> 


1 


•C^^i-« .1-1 .fM(>J^ . .iC 


CO 


CO^Ci^'N5^»-^ .(Mi-i^Ti< 


^5^0i-H,-i,-i^ ,co^^ — ^ 




1 


•■MO • • ^ .^c<j^ . C0OCQi-it>-i-i<N(N.^ • '.-(.^(M 
. — . . . . . 5^ ^ . . 


a 
< 




CO .-* ^ ^ <M 


1-1 t>- 














^ 






T*< 








[ 








; ^ 




"^ 


• 




-^ 




• 


Be; 






-;- 


- 


- 




— 


- 


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a 

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s 
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03 

a 

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> 

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a 

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a 


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Digitized by VjOOQIC 



22 



FORTY-FOURTH REGISTRATION REPORT. 



[1896. 



•73 



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a 
o 



50 
00 



w 

H 

o 
o 

QQ 

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*-i ^^^ 00(M»^C^ll 






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. 


pci 


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CO'N .'NO — ^Ot^OJCO 




>i 


— *^. cO«5-. -^ 


' ^ 




CO 


b 


^ •'^0<N •^COO^^COOf-'G^C^OOiC^OO^ 


■ PS u 


o 


« 00 t^ CO O ^ »^ 


1 ?^ 


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; 0. 


. . ?o . ,-. ^ ^ 


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t— • 






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Digitized by VjOOQIC 



1896.J 



CAUSES OF DEATH. 



23 







T»<OiCOQ0^005O»OCCt>-CO(N 


•^ 


CO 


1-H 


CO O CO O X 




cc 


^ 


1-* 


CO 


1-H 1 


"IVXOJ, 








00fi0O0C—"«^00l^»C^'*^Q0»-i^^C0»-^^'*^O'*1<— »o • 




Ui 


,-H<^<^^^^^CO^ (M'^f'^^ 


>< 




»— • •— 


OS 




;D^OO»C^oOOOOO^Oii-iCOG^ .<M^<M^^ .•-il>-OX'- 




^ 






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"^fCSOCOXJOCOt^eMtOCO-^ — CO^fMCOCOC^CO^CO'O-^C^ • 


5? 


s 




1 


ooco»coooocooo^<NO^o '^-^t^- .coo .co«ot^'^*-< 


£ 


OCOtJI r-^ ^ •>! (M*. (N'.CO"^ 




t 

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ti' 


^ -l-^OOO .(MiCO'^CO^O»-ii-i(M(M(NO'<^.-^rli'^rJ*uO • 


£ 


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s 


COOiOOOOOOO'^OCOCOO'^^fM 


^X^»Ci'* (Nt^l>X^I 


-^rt^ ^^^(-sj !>. (M 


CO 


CO X *-* 


^ 


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(M ^ (M 








Ph 


0(N(N^ .^^(M . .u^ . . . 


. ^ . ^ (M 


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1 


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Digitized by VjOOQIC 



24 



FORTY-FOURTH REGISTRATION REPORT. 



[1896. 



•^3 

.9 

a 
o 
O 



CO 
OS 

00 



w 

H 
<1 

ft 
O 

CO 

P 

O 
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1 


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CO 2SI *>! 10 »C CO t>- 


1^ X 1 


1VXOJ, 












— t^OT^^" .^COCO-i^C^ .^iCCOOCO — I>-"Ci^ 


X 


Pci 


(M^(M •'M .^ »^0»C 


£ 




— CC • .CO^CO00»C^ -^5^1 — 02^CO"*!*'aiCOX(M 




ni 


(>iO'' ^ • 0^ — ooco 


• 


d 


Oail>-r<*--^'^C£iC^>*'- •'M003^»0»C'^COl>-'»o' 


5^ 


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1 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



1896.] CAUSES OF DEATH. 



25 



•lYiOX 



<M 



I 00 ^ ^ i-i l>- ^ 






.00 ^ 



1^ 

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(N CO 


• CO 


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1 


CO »o 


•C0(MOOi0CD00l>00C0*0 
1-t (N (M .^ t-i 


a> 


G^^C0G^Tli.^O(N 
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i 


lO CO 


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^ ^ ^ . „ 



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^ *- «> "^ !M ^ 



^ • CO '^^ ^ • 'CO 
"i^"~i^'co~co~'N • '^~^' 






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f~^ ^ ^ . CO G^ 



n 1-1 CO -•^ 






^ ^ C^ ^ (M 



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« a o.^ a i: fc- , 
Cm ^ u Oi 5 r ® • 
a? « « .tr o P»^'g 

hM S hH S S U4 I 



oT^Tco" 

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Digitized by VjOOQIC 



FORTY-FOURTH REGISTRATION REPORT. 



[1896. 



•T3 

O) 



a 

o 
I 

oa 
00 



w 

H 
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P^ 
Q 

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CO 

CO 



I 

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t^ 


T^ 


1^ ! 


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t^ »-H 


•'— '«-^ -CO"^ • 'O '"MC 




, 


1 ^. 


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■ H 1 ^ 




. . . CO L^ ^ 'M • • 




• 


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^ 


• 
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A 1 >^ 


r-. ^ 


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t* 1 o 




CO OC *-* CO • 1 


'^*i| 


. 


.^ . .'cor^ • •'^ •CO'N'N'CXTr'O'MTfCO -"^1 


• 


. . . . 'N 'O -M ; * 1 


i^ 1 *^ 


»-H 1— ^ 




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, £ 1 £ 






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Digitized by VjOOQIC 



1896.] 



Causes of death. 



27 



"ITXOJj 



1 CD CO 
l- 00 



Tt< to 00 

o 

CM 



-H O Oi r-« 



fM CO 
1-1 C^l 



CO O G5 1 



iCO'T^OiOCOCM'^OO'^O 

(M O r^ (M 

CD 



^' 


•.OOOCO'>l^^(>lCN,-i(MiO 
• CO '^l' <M »-i 


CO 00 '^ 
CO 


^(MCOCO 'T-M.^ 'COCOCO 

T-l O • • .-^ 

CO • 


^' 




3^ 


CO .^ 
CO 



I Oi 'D 

-^ CO 



CO '^ s^ 



-*-C0'-HOC0i-H'^»0' 
^ CO 



>iOCO»-iG^(M.-iCO'^ 
CO 






i-H (>! T-« ^ «^ CO 



. (M CO -^ 



' Tf Tf G^ 

I'* 



• ca (N t-i CO 



i^ 


(^ 


t-H 


00 'N 


^ 


o 


^ 






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•T^ o 


^ 


CO CO 


1-H 


"<M O CO CO 




•^ 


t-H 






C^ 


f1 


(■^^ 


<M CO Ci • • • ^ r-< — . ^ 


>- 


^ 


• • • (M 


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a 
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00— i(:cCO(Nr-l»Ct^i-lOOCO<NI>CO 


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55 


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Digitized by VjOOQIC 



28 



FORTY-FOURTH REGISTRATION REPORT. 



[1896. 



0) 

S3 

a 

a 
o 
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CO 

ca 

00 



o 

m 

< 

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9 

PQ 
EH 







t* (>< 11 ©ii 


»-H 


wM 


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^M 


fl^00©«00OS 


^ 1 


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•o ^ 


CO 


^^ 






lO • • • f-^ . ©< f* CO — < -^ 


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f^ 


• . . . (N . . . . . 1 


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^ (N .o '5© • "^ii lO C^ .^ 'I*' »-< <N t^ •O »-• 




^ 




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r 


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III 


■2 S . 

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o o o 


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Ph 
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s 
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a 
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Q OQ 

o 


p g 03 o: 
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1 



1 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



1896.] 



CAtTSES Of DEATfl. 



^d 







<N 


»o 


1-^ 


^.^ 


<N 


,— 1 


l> '^ (M CO 


^ 


CO '^ 


1-H 


r^ 


1-H 


05 CO C5 


»^ 


1—1 


1—1 


(M 


1-^ 


t-H 


CO I 


•TTIOX 


^ ^ CO -^ CO 

00 




.0 .^L>.^cO .<NC0»Ol^.--i 'rt- .l^COOi^ '^(N • • — 




(X 


^ CO • • • . . ^ 






•^rp . . . . . 


?M 'i-i -tO -Tf-^ • •?DOCO»-< '^3^ • • '^-i • » ^ ^ <>i 




^ 


^. . . ..^0 . ..... 3q 


i 


t 


00-^ '^t^i-Hi^CO^fMOCOCO '(N •U0COrJ*»-r ..-1^ .f-<l^ 


SB si 


p 




N 


10 • • • • 


• 


•^rj*^ 'iO •CO'-i^^iOCOt-t^(M»^rJ* 'iC --h .^,-« -CO 


^ L^ ... . ^ 


_^ 


^ .... 


u 


^ 


•00—1 . .,^^,-,co^ .00^ » ^ .— (NCO^ '^ • • '(M 


^ 





. . . i>. . . . . . . ^ 


> 


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CO • • . . 




s 


^ ^ ,-, ^ ^ 


.^•MrHCO«5?DCO^COr-iOO^O *^ 


(M i-( 


f^ ..H 


< 


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ft 


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Digitized by VjOOQIC 



36 



FORTY-FOURTH REGISTRATION REPORT. 



[1896- 









«5 (N CO Ci 








"lYXOX 


c^ 








- - - 






1 




U^ ^ CO-M 






1 ^ 

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1^ 


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1 


II! 


Tt* eq CO «o~ 






If 


O 








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f-* 


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s 


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45 


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1 


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Digitized by VjOOQIC 



1896.] 



CAUSES OP DEATH. 



31 



.'§, 



•2 





CI 




O 




r< 






o 


C 


o 




00 

1—1 


g 




O 




V. 


w 


'=*-. 


H 


^ 


■al 


•i^ 


m 


'■« 


Q 


^ 


fe 


^ 


o 


s 




^ 


oo 


CO 


H 


rC? 


r/J 




& 


<ii 


O 


"^ 




s. 




■» 


h^ 


rO 


h-i 


S 
1 


1 




-< 




H 


C35 




•»»> 




S 




O 




-C* 




CO 




* "X 




25^ 




•^ 




l-O 




« 




^ 












^ 




rO 




« 




r< 




^ 




^ 




"^ 




<i) 




C5^ 




SS 




C^ 




S^ 




5^ 



•'iviox 



CO '^ ^ •-• 



(>1 




tbOZ 






o 



! *-__ 

I - 






o 



d 



a 

o 



.2 S ^ 



_ c 
2 S 



• o 






3^ 

3<! 



'^ ?P > 2 OS o) M S 






Digitized by GoOgfe 



32 



FORTY-FOURTH REGISTRATION REPORT. 



[1896. 





1 




*-4 


t^i<OOt^(N'^aO'MI>-iC'^i«QO^COCOO 


^^ 


IC <i^ CO (M CC 


1 




1 '17X0 J, 


(NCO '*i<'^ CO CO CO'Hr^ 


1 




-~ 


. 


. — lO l^ ^ . CO 1^ .CO • r-* ^ . n . ri V ^ .0 ^ 00 . 1 




M 


Ex4 




1 


H 


. 


— 00'N»0'N^— -M-^OSOl^^O-^COaO^^iOCOO^MO! 






S^ 


^ CO CO CO CO -M 


<M 


i 




?*^'S 


~&:' 






• ." 








• 
































1 




bt ** 




















































<|eS 


^ 






. 








* 




































en 


<i 






• 












































•c . 








?vl 








• CO 
































' 




Sfe 


u. 




































































































1 S = 


?^ 














. 




































S^ 


fe 






n 








•^ 




































o 


>■ 






• 








*»• 












































:o 








'N 


CO 
































pS 


^ 














































. 


'-0 


?( 






— -N 






— 


-• 










— '^ 


^ -M 






1 


Q 1 


^P 


PK^' 














— -t* 


-* 












— 


• • 


^^ .■ 


.s i 


"2 


l:^ 


' 










: ■ 




• ^0 




• CO — 




. T^^f^ 






1 




. .0 





• . wm 'N 






. 
















, 


, 




, , 




, , , , , ^_, 


O 


i 




_ ._ 

















I'- 






-' 







-N CO 


. • 




^ 


•N 'N 


• '^ 


-^ 


1 


1 


oS 






to 




! '^ 




— ; 


n • 


1 


CO 

C5 


' '2 


>. 
^ 
s 








^H 






kO 


CO -M — n 


^ • 




I- IM • . — 


00 


' 2 


.-H 


•i. 


f-H 


rti -N 














1 
1 




• CO -i 


iO r-* ^ ^ -^ 




..0 '- 




-M 




^ CO • 


< ' 


' s^ 


p^ 




^ ^ ^ 




•^ . • 


• 


\ '. '. 




• • 




n 


mm r-4 




\^ 1 


1 2 


l:^ 




Tt< — Oi 






T*< • 


00 • 


• f^ ^N 




t£> . 




CO ^ • • • 


' 


Q 1 


«8 
"5 










ri 






-* 


^ 


^ 








CO 




- 




^ -M . 


1 


§' 


^ 






















1 


1 










, 


, 




















, 


















' .0 


(X4 
















































1 — 










































. ^ 


^ 








CO 


>• f-^ 


.« 


>i 








-^ *— 
















i 1 


*» 
® 


^, 






































aci 








. ^ 








-N 






















— 




1 


p ' 


1 ''^'^ 






- 




w^ \~^w^ 




,^ 


_^ 


.^ 


-M 












- — 




— - 




^ 








-jj ' 


'M 


(*% 






































O 1 

1 ' 


1 ." 


^. 






^ ; 






• 
































1 


1 , 


1 '2 


^i 






'N ^ 






— 


































^ 










'N r^ 




- — 


__ 


— 


- 


- 







— 


— - 




















h-l 
























h-i 1 


"2 












— 


— :— 




— - 










— - 




— 
















P> 


:^ 






• 1 


















^ 




1 


M 1 










>• ^v 








































s , 


o5 


^ 








































1 


« 1 


. 






1— « 






,^ 










^— — 




















< ' 


"*^ 


i^' 










































H 1 


03 -gw 


^ 






CO . 






'— 








— • • 


-^ 
















1 








'M ^ 
















.-^ 


















1 


1 


1 « s 


s 






































1 










, , 










CO 








•^ 






^x < 




-T^ 






1 


TJ . 


fa 






. 






































c-" 








,_, 












CO 






















« 








p 


^ 




















































^ 





















! cj 





















































• Zl 




» • 






















a 




bD c 




















■ 
. 'I' 




• c 
; 










c 

a 




'. 03 
• 











PQ M 


i t^ 


• a 
DO 


a; 






C 


t 






0^ 


03 


0! 




ti 


OR 

s 


n 










.'Ho S 

gOQCC 




Si^S-P c 

QJ S CD 

.^ 2 « > 


1 811 Sill - 
irtjillll 












-< <tj<;<j <j <j 


























D 


giti2 


!ed 


byV^oogle 



1896.] 



CAUSES OP DEATH. 



33 



•ivioj, 


1 "^ 


"^ Oi OC 

Oi (>i ^ 


a: 


3<J 


0^ ^ 


CO ^- t>- oi 

CO »-< CO CO •— < 


'^ 


CC 






»-H 


•^ 


i> 


»H 


^N 


cc 


'^ 




« 


^ 


CDCX)C00i5O — CO .lO^OCOl^CD^ 


. Tl< l^ . . .CO 

. ^ . . . 


. ^ ^ .^ 




oc 


i^ 


C0OO0iC0»^O»^Q0-^t^OC0'^^ 
.-, ^ ^ — 1 i-< 'N CN 


(>1 


,_| ,-4 ^-4 ^ ,-H 




c^ • 






lij 




; ; 
















; ; ; 
















- 






; I 




;^ 




; ; 
















! ! ! 




















\ • 








-N 
















. f-M ^^ 






; '^ 






', '^ 






; ^ 




i-H • 














! ! ! 






; 


















i 80 
80. 1 to 90. 


^ 




cc 
5^1 




^ ^ 






CM 


•- 


'-- 




. Tjl 3sl ^ 


• ^ (>i 


















;^ 


.-M ^ 


CO 


• 1 


^ 


! '^ 




' 1 


















^' 


CO Oi ^ • 


• -M 






. . CO «o 




^^ X 










1—1 






; ^'3 




(>1 cc 

cc 


.-1 CM 


•^ 


— 




CO CO 05 








Tt< 








.<N 




"^ ; 




60 
to 70. 


^ CO 


- 


'M 


»-^ ^ l>- tJI 


<N 










"^ 




1 • 




^ 


CO oc 


Tjl ^ -H 


1-H !> •-< 


1-H 


'^ 


^ »-^ ^ 


'^ • 




4 
4 
< 


1^ 


^ 0^ (M CO 




-^ 


»-H 


I-H CO • *-• 








• 


._. 


- 


-~; 




;^ 


'^ 


f^ 
05 Tt 


^ 




• 


i-H 


^ <M ^ ^ 


• 1 


•^ 


, 




^ 




»-H 




1 






— CO ->< -^ 


. 05 






^ 










1^* 


,-10^ 






Ttl 








CO ^ • 


^ ! 




















!M (M 






^ 








• 


-^ 




-* 












«— < • 




CO 




-- 


• 5^ 


! ^ 




1 1 


• »— 1 .-H 


























i-l G^< rH 


CM 






-.v| 


! 


























CO 3^1 


- 


— 


»-^ 


1>< 




^ ^co - 
























'4 




i-H . 






^ 




















— 








;^ 






CO 








1 










-- 










— 








^ 






(>l 














^H 












;^ 






• 














-^ 




























o 

"2 


fe 






f^ 








CO <>< 


<M 




























;^ 






-• 




-^ 


1-H • 


CO 




























^ 








^ 


- 


—'— 


~^~ 




'M 




— 


— 






— 


^- 


- 




— 








1^ 




- 


— 








Ti* 










"2 


PEJ 












^ -1 


c^ 
















-. 


- 










^ 








— 




-- 




; 




Til 










-- 


— 


-; 






1^' 










— 




»o 






















— , 




— 


- 


- 




^^i~" 




— 



















































S 










^ 


CO »— 




CO i-H 

CO ^~' 


- 


--- 


- 


- 


-" 


- 


- 


-. 


- 


- 


— ; 




Under 
1. 


1^ 






CO 

"co 




"-^ 


l>. ^ 




^ 












'^ . 


l>- . 




CO (>< • 

CO 






CC 

2C 


















CAUSES OF DEATH. 




2 

c 

k 

a 

'b 

c 
< 

5 


'. 2 

• > 

■ i 

• OS 

P. 

c 

a 

< 


^ a 
> c 


£ 

1 


1 c 

• c 

: £ 

• « 

c 

0. 

"a 
< 


1 

a 

C 
c 
a 
< 


§ 

E = 
o< 

t 
PQPC 


,s 

oc 
a 
b 


• c 

£ 

1 


b 

'c 
•i: 


b 

a 

a 

2 

pq 




• a 

: £ 

, c 

'< 

c 


.1 


oc 
"a 

t 


a 

a 


c 
c 
c 

3igi 


: £ 

! c 

1 
1 

tize 


1 

db 


. a 

Iff 

1 


.£ 

-> 


3C 


' be 





34 



FORTY-FOURTH REGISTRATION REPORT. 



[1896. 



<© 



.9 

a 
o 
O 



CO 

00 



a 

Q 

O 

GO 

GO 
P 

Q 



e3 



"lYXOX 


tH O (N 


^^ 


(N 


rH 


<N »0 


(M 


t-I 


I-H 


Oi ca '^ (M »c 
CO ^ 


t-I 


iC CO <N 


f-i 


(N 1-1 (M 


1 




• »0 C>4 • rH ♦ •-I (N (>l • 


«0 >0 (N 

rH 


3^ lO 


"G^~^ i-H^ (M 


rH Cq 


>3 


Tj^ »o 


^ -H rH ,-1 CO 


f-H 1—1 






rH 


SO <N ^ 






: 


Age 

not 

stated. 


^ 
















































: 


i^ 




;- 


— 


-- 














- 




-- 


- 












- 


- 


-- 


— 


— ^ 


If 

4 


^' 














^ 


















































fc' 




.(M 


















(M 






















: 


i^ 


CM . 










^ 






• 3^ 






















*i 


^ 


• (>1 




^ 




»— 1 






t-l Ttl ^ t-l CO 


r-« i-i 


- 




~ 


-; 


^ 


1-H 




! "^ 


• 






• G^ . . . 


"^ 




50 ' 60 
to 60. 1 to 70. 

1 


^ 


. o ^ 


• 




r-< rH 




^ L^ ,-, ,-, 


Ci 




• 




— 


— 


— 


-; 


a 


^ <N . .-H rH 




• 


^ -H r^ CO • 






^ 




^ 




. T*< ^ 








• 






. ^ . 


CO 


1 






'^ ! 


^ 




_ ^ 








rH r-< 






»-i uO (>1 


• 


• w^ 








. 


'1 


1^ 




. CM 








. r-< . ,-i 




. . CO 




'^ 


^ 


^ ^ 




^ 


a 




rH 










^ 






^ (>1 




! "^ 




rH 








i 
4 


^' 




• • 


















•CO 




5v* 










-• 






— 


;— 


— 


- 


- 




;— 


.- 


. - 






. (M 


.-;- 




.- 














— ; 


^' 


























^ 








• r-i r-< 










"2 


fii 
















































^ 


^ 


















































ot2 

"2 


fe 


















































^ 


















































o 

2 


^ 


















































;^ 


















































-I 


P^ 


















































S' 


















































-1 


^ 


















































S 


















































^ 


















































!^ 


















































If 


^ 


















































a 












— 




- 












— 


- 




-- 


















^ 






























'-^ 




:^ 
















































1 


ta 

o 

a 
< 




c 

c 

£^ 

c 

c 


4 

> 

2 


b 

c 
s 


• fl 

• a 

2 
a 

D <1} 

s 

3 


^ 

g 
^ 


1 


s 

• bj 

a 

a 

s 
S 


Dg 

3 

-> a 

a 

c 


> 

> 

c 


c 


'c 


E 

3 
*-) 
C 


B 

c 


S 

-a 


3 

a 






-1 

c 


CO 

-^ 3 

3 


c 

a 

3 

5 


! a; 

• c 

;*5 

o 

CO 


a 

U 


o 



Digitized by' 



1896.] 



CAUSES OF DEATH. 



35 







o: 


(N 


1-^ 


•^ CO (N 


»H 


i-H 


lO u^ 




C<l O uo 00 (M CO <M 


'N 


-^ 


^ 




00 Tf 1 


•^viOJ, 


o 1-1 




i 


l>-(M^'^C0(M'-ii-i»Ci0-H(NOG^^G<l»-i<M^00'^(Ni000 


. 1 fe 


f-* i-H CO (M 'T*H *- 


H 




C^ — 


QQ 


^' 


G<l 
























■CO 'M 

. ^-^ rH 


•5vJO'-<COI>O^CO«C 

CO CO .-H r-« Tt 






























CO 




&«■§ 


fe 




















































^ 


















































C ^ 


^ 


















































Is 


)!S 


















































4 


fe 






























CO 


















1^ 






























•^ 












CO 






. 






























, 












»-H 


. 


/I 


N 






























• 
















S 






























uO 












O^ 






1-H 


























, 












rH i-H • 


p 


P^ 










































^s 












































;^ 






























1-H 












G<l . . 


































<M 












• (N • 


*1 


f=M 












































s 






























• 












-H CO • 










rH 


rH 














,_^ 


, 












, , , 


'I 


t^ 
























. 












. 




a 








1 


; 














• ] 


5^ « 












»-H 




o 


p^' 




1— 1 


CO CO 


^4 • 


CO -* ^ (M C^ 


^ 












• 




^l 


^ 






















CO 






^ ; 


1 1 






, , 




1 
















s^ 


fe 


• 1-H « 


1-i 00 G^ • 


^ (M ^ . 




l^ . 




^N 














































s 


;^ 








. 










































1-H 




, 


rH 


, 


. 


, 






, 


. 


. 




, 




, 




, 


, 


, 


, 


, 








— ; 


--- 
























• 






























































•i^ 


<i 


• 




























• 




















_• 






























1— t 
















O |X( 
















































































- 














"-2 


1^ 


1-H 
























• 














, 


































^^ 




f-^ • 


o 1 ^ 


. 










































s 


;^ 


• 


























-M 








• 






















































tfi 


1X4 














































""2 


s 
















. 








_- 














»H 


CO 




































1-H 


, 








TJ< 


In 






































. 








"2 


:^ 






























»H 




1 


»H 












1— « 
























(>l • 




1— t 1-^ T-H 




rH r-< 


CO 

1-^ S 


































































^ 




rH rH lO 1-H 






1 


^ 




— 


— 


— 


- 


— 
















CO 
00 






. -^ l> (M 






-* 


1^ 






















• -^ -«ii (>l 






»c 






CO 
























Oi 




^ Oi CO CO "^ 




CO 




p^ 


























Oi 




1-i CO 


































•-H 








^H 


fl"" 


. 


. 
























"^ 




rH CO <N O^ t^ 




*^ 


t) 


a 


























00 




(N O 




Tt* 


'^ 


* 


— 


|— 


'— 


;- 
















c^ 






- 


.— . 




■ 63 












• 








a> 
























' Of' 






















« 








' fl ;^ 








• 3 


> • 








• ■*j 








t • 


g ■ 


• 




• u 














' a 














!'S • 


1< 


" 




' O 


_g QD 








tiD 


3 CD 






. a 








k 






' Xi 


' -S O 






• hJ ' ^ 3 






• ^^ 






! 0? 


s 

Ed 


.22 -S 

11 


c 
c 
< 


uS 'o c? » « 




• ^ 05 a x> 
•g.'^ S g § 


.2 

'c 


C 


! OD 

. a 
' o 




^2 

oc 








C 


* 
























C 


c 


>c 


C 




Si 


m 


.^ 


fe^ 


6 


ioi 



'XS * 



36 



FORTY-FOURTH REGISTRATION REPORT. 



[1896. 



•73 
O 

P 

a 

a 
o 



00 



w 

Q 
O 

o 

I 

B 



I 



•ivxox 


^t<«^,^-^CM^OO QO CO «-i ^»0 


»H 


0: 


S5 


H 


fe 


CO<X)Q0^5^00r->O^ 

^ ^ -^ -^ ^ ^ 


05 rH CO 'M 

1— « 


^ ^ ;o 


•H CO -*J< ^ kO '^ ^ 

cq ^ -^ ^ 


00 


S 


^oo»c^oooooo?c 
i>» CO ^ -^ 




->< "^f Cq '^ •r*' 

CO 


• ^ l>. 








• • 


;-- 


- 


;— 


— 


-- 




■- 


• 7M 


.- 


, ~ 






■ 






r" 


"" 


: 
















^ 
^ 


— 




CO" 


•~ 


-- 


- 




- 


-;_^ 






— 


'- 


!--■ 


- 


—^ 




^ 




CO 


'^ 




1^^ ^^ 








'-^ 


-^ CO • 


ilS 




^ 


-^ 




• 1-^ 1--* 




'N 






— 




^ 


; -^ * ; 


b 




'^ ^ «> 

1-« 




•^ . . 




.(M 


... 




ri 




(M 


. CO -^ * 


^ 




»-i ^ rf 


(M ^ ^ ^ ^ 


CO 




<M . ^ 




CO 


•CO 'M -^ 


50 60 
to 60 ' to 70. 






•<*» rH 




CD . ^ ,-1 








! ! ! 







. 00 ^ 


s 




CO 




>; ^ (M ,.1 




• f* 


. . (N 


rH -^Ij* 


. (M 'N . 










- 








(N 


- 


rH 


. CO 


CO t-i »H 


J^ 






•N 


^ 






r- r^ .00 


^ CO ^ 


40 
to 50. 


pc; 






co" 


- 


CO C^l 5^ 

1— t • 






— 








•^ -^ 


<M CO 


r-. rf rH 


>i 


- 


■ 1-^ 


• CO 




'- 


' ^ 


CO 


. (N CO <N 


\'i 


^ 


^ 


i^H ^H 


CO '-t <N 


^ 






^ 




• CM i-t i-t . 


^ 










^ CO 


. C^ . rH 


'I 


^ 
^ 
















CO 


r~i 










• CO 


(3^ <M ^ 


1 ^S 






- 


- 


- 


— 


(M 


— 


- 


co~ 


— 


- 






1— « 


rH C^ 




rH CO 






- 


rH 


• ^M 


"2 









— 










! 


• rH • rH 




— 




- 




- 


- 


• rH 




•c 








- 






"co 


. ^ CO *-H 

"^ c6~ 




! "2 




^ 








a 
















-^ 

















^ CO 


CO -^ • 


: 


^ 
















-^ 


■ I> 
















rH 


! ! ! *^ 


"s 


1^ 
















1 


X 




















. .-1 5^ • 


-s 


^ 






































<N .-1 • 


a 
















-^ 



CO 




















• ^^ • 


00 


^ 
















•^ 


^ 


















-. rH . 


s 
















(M ^ CO 


• 1-H 












^ 


5^ .-• fH 


1 and 

under 

2. 


^ 










CO 




. . i>. 


• 










1-i 




• CO • 


^ 










CO 






t-H .-H 








• 




^ Oi . 


Under 
1. 


^ 
^ 


CO 

£ 

3 

a 


'.2 

g 


a 


as 
"cc 






-«t 


— 


CM 


CO 
•CO 


" 








IH 




.^00 • 

CM rH . 

CO ^ 

-N CO 




' 00 


00 




■J 

' c 

oj 

c 
a 














CAUSES OP DEATH. ! 


□ 

g 




B 
Si 


03 

5 


.2 

'5 


' 09 
a 

5 


1 

^ 

p 


; > 

> 

P 


OE 

a 

■1 


• t 

<: 
s 

at 

ul 
B 




oi 

S 

03 

c 
S 


Oi 

a 

> 

a 




,2 

a 



c 


2 

•♦J 
c 


2 
C5 


CU 



.1896.] 



CAUSES OF DEATH. 



37 



"lYlOX 


CO 
1— t 


" 


5^ CO O (M '«*^ 
"^t »- G^ 


«-H 


l> 


-«t 


00 (N 


1-H 


CO <N G^ »0 


k:^ CO l> O O !>. 00 

(N 00 ^ Oi 

1-i 


M 


^ 


iC • — l>- O (M 1-1 


cc 


coco^ — <N .,-Hiocooco^i^aico 


OD 


S 


X) 1-1 -^ CO 
C^ CD 




•CO -^ 


00 o ^^ 


•.-H(N.-HOG^CO'^aiCOOO<M 

O rH 1-1 00 CO 


a«1 

to 






- 


; 


















— 


— 


— 




-- 








• 1-H • 


^ 














—. 


— . 








. . . 




~ ^ 




." 


- 


— ; 


- 


— 


- 




- 


- 


1-H 




^1 


^ 






• 




^ 




• t-H (M »-( 








t-H 




(>^ 


X (M t^ 1 


;^ 






(M 






c^ 




Tji . 








•00 ^ 


CO 


CD 1-H (M . 


i 








'— 


CO 




f* 


(N 








. (N (M ^ (>1 


-H .QO • 


^ 


(M 




• 


— CO • -H 






CD (M 




lO ^ o • 
CD -< CO • 

•-H r-4 • 


«5 


^ 




-- 


1— t 


(M ^ i-i . 


^ G^ ^ 








^ 1-" (>1 


;^ 


t-H 


lO • 


1-H 


(M CO 


— 


— 


— 


— 


CO ^ 
>0 • 


-«ii ^ CO 

^ ,-rco 

1-H 


— 00 1 


^1 


pc; 


1— t 


G^ ^ tH 








CD 




CO r-4 . 
1-H • 


1^ 


• -H O (M • 








5<l 






1-H »-H 


'«*< CO 


^ G^ '«*< 


Oi ; 




p^ 


1 


<M CO 00 








CO 




^H 




00 • 


1-H 


CO • 


;^ 


'^ 


(M O . 








^ 










ZU ; '^ ^ 


1-H 


1-H 


^i 






- 


O '^ >o 








t-H 










CD 1-H 






CO 


»H 


^ Oi . 




»-H 


^ ^ 




■-- 




CD — • 






l> 


5<l • 


4 


1^' 






3^ O^ (M 






: 


3^1 

CO 


^ 




: 


I> 1-1 






'^ 


1-^ 


^ 


i-H 


(>1 CO 

• o 




- 


;- 




- 


— 


00 • ^ 


^ o 


1-H 




"5 


^ 






.CO 








1-H 


— 


— ^ 


;^ 






^ 00 














o2 
"5 


^" 






. ^ <N 




- 


















. 5^ 












1^ 






• f-M 




















. G^ 


- 






» 1-H 






C> 
lO'"' 

s 


^ 






. ^ 


~co ~ 


- 








(>1 










1 1 


, • 


^ 






^ 






^ 








^ 
















-H 






"5 


1^' 






; 




- 


- 






























s 






. ^ 






- 


-- 


-- 


- 






















"2 


lii 






1 




















— 




1-H 






^ 






'^ 
























1-H 


- 












o,*^ 

2 


^ 






• G^ 




--- 








"-^ 






















^ 






• 














— 


— 




— 


















1 and 
under 


1^ 






-^ 
































^ 






"co 












- 


(M r-i 


- 






*H 
















1 - 


^ 


CO 












(M 


^ 














CD 


a 


CO 


'^ 












CO i-H 




^ CO 














(N 


5 




ao 

1 
1 


OS 

B 


I [3 

ft 


*o 

" c 
> 


. (a 

' a 
> ti 

O 


a 

5 


c 

a 

bi 

fl 
03 


s 

oi 


OI 
C/2 


03 


0) 

•4-1 

s 
u 


c 

a 
o 

"o 
O 


u 

a 
o 


a 

*s 

a; 

a 

03 

a 


B 

83 


' QO 

1° 


a 

a 

a; 

P3 


a 

c 

i 

-4-9 

PC4 


> 

a 
> 


o: 

■i 03 
> 


Oi 

a 


!2 

' 03 

:^ 
a 

o; 


3 
g 



ft 



o 



Digitized by' 



38 



FORTY-FOURTH REGISTRATION REPORT. 



[1896. 



1VXOX 



OOQO*-HifiG<ll>-l>0'3^l-^«-^l>i0^i-i<M>lCD'^COOO»-i| 



•T5 



a 
o 
Q 



CO 

00 



a 

ft 

o 

i 

GO 

P 
< 









•^ 1-1 (M (N i-H • 00 • I 



<NCO •CO*-^-H'^cOO»000«l'*CO' 



<^s 



5^ 
8® 






_S 
fa 
S_ 
fa 

_fa' 

fa 

fa 



I o 

C5 






^3 , S 

S^ I---.- 
fa 

_fa 
_»_ 

fa 

_5_ 
fa' 

l_? 

"I- 
I ^ 

fa 

_s_ 

fa 

_^ 



CO 
CO"t-i 

(M ^ 

^ (^^ 



fl 
^ 



fa 



fa 
« 

fa 
O 

GO 
fa 






V 



OO 



*** ^ a 



•- 05 



03 



• CO 
<N ~ . 



• G<l rH Tj* 



kO CO "^ . -VI 
^ • C^ 

CD tJi l> ^ -^ " 



s = 



o5 



J3 <i> 



•5 05 55 *5 •§ S 



V 






« a> a> .s^ o >> 



a ffl a S ffl a ^ .2 5 .5 5 5 



a 
^ S 



■^ CO 



O (M 

00 

o" 

CO 



■^^^1 



00 g S « 
2? « ?. .S 

<y *^ VC bd 
.22 ooQ^ 



S-. a ® ^ 

QCaocSoDD^S'^ 

Q -, - -xs « t- n o 






- a rtJ'^ P^.i^os a-" o S p 



Digitized by' 



5gl 



fe 



1896.] 



CAUSES OF DEATH. 



39 







>o 


<N 


i-H 


1-H 


1-H 


CO 




"^ t^ lO (M 'N 




1-H 


»OOOCO<M(MCOCO<MQOl>-l 


•^vxoJQ 


^ ^ lO u^ c^ ^ »o 







00^,-<,-i .,-1,-r •CO'^ • 'iCi •'MOt-iO'-iCDTiiCNCDC^ 




^ 


-^ . • . • • CQ t>- i-H (>1 
• • 






l^ ^ • 




^ (>1 


'^'^i^<M<M^^CO00<^l(M^t-.^ • 


5^ 




S 


<M 






C^ GO ^ CO • 














1 as| 


^ 
















































:l 


'r'^. 


^ 


















































; Is 


^ 












-- 


-- 




































8§ la 














































. 


1-* 












































, 


, ' = 


1* 
















































s 


^ 








— • 






































. 


/?4 








, 
































T-* --^ 


1 oS 1^ 










f 


































, '-3 


1^ 




















^ 


-H 




. 5^ 




fH 


rji 








«-H 
















— 




CO 


^ 




(N . 


*o 




^'^z6 


— 











- 


— 


,_. 


— 





— . - 


1-1 <M~ 




— 






•~l 1—1 






■ f— 1 »— 1 


•tJ 


S 






































CO ^ 








p^ 














. 


•CO 








. (M • 


s^ 


P^' 












— 


- 


— 


-- 


— 


- 


^•-- 


r-i C6~ 


— 


-- 


;-- 




:g 


(>\ — • 












-^ 
































• • • 


. 




rj* . r-1 r-1 




















, 


• (>< 




^ 5^ r-i . 


40 
0. j to 50 

1 


N 


































CD 




— - 


— 






- 


- 


— 


— 


- 








5^ 


• 




— 


- 


. ^ ^ 














• rH . (M 






• 


i ^' 


















— - 


— 




- 


— 


- 














^ ■ 


.-4 
















. (N 


»— 1 










1 *j 








































1 " . " 


. 


, 


























^^ 


^^ rf 








> P-4 


. ^^ 


\^ 
















— 


— 


— 


— 


- 


-- 








— 


-— 


;-- 




• 






















(>< ^ 


i 


^ 


-- 


-~ 


— 








— 


— - 




— 


— 
















'^ 






























„l^ 


,^ 






1 ifiS 


b 




- 


-- 


-- 






^- 




- 








" 


- 






— 


f— 1 1-H 


-^ 






N 










































^ . ^ • 






1 »o 


^ 










































1 o*-" 

i "B 












— 


~ 


— 




" 






~ 




"~ 


"^ 






(>1^ — • . 






!^^ 










































,^ 


CO CO • CO 






1 <=> 


^ 










































1 iO- 




































"-^ •" 


rji"" 






)^ 
































'M 




. 
































<M 


CO — • 


-M 






1 ^"^ 


^ 










































1 ^ 

1 


:5^ 
































-• 


CO • 


-* 










































Ttl . 


. 






' cc^ 


^ 










































1 3 


p. 


































iQ -M — .0 














- 


- 


- 


- 


-~ 











— 


"" 








»o 


• -M (Nl 




, 


1 r," 


\M 








































1 ^'s 


^ 


















^ 












Tt* 


»0 (M -^ T^ 






1 and 

under 

2. 














- 


- 




• 




- 











00 to .0 
i^Tr-T^ ro 

<N CO G^ »0 


;- 


;-; 








- 


— 


u 








CO ^ 


»o 


,_ 


li- 


^ 




















• 


-^ 


'M 






:^ 
















. Tj« CO '-•(>< G<I CO »^ 


C^l 


'M (^^ ^ ^ 






1 P 


















.— 


CO ^ 






















• CO 














































3 


































CO 


• c 








* a 


































1 


• 
; ?^ 




; c 
























I'd 












CAUSES OF D 


c a» 


: 5 .2 «'' S 

;<is go 

oIP It: 

" Q- 5- ? 

5^ g "5 f^ II 


a 

a: 


• c 

c 

-C 




it 

c 
< 


'a 

a; 


• C 


DC 

c 
'c 


Oc/: 


'I 

a 


J 

i 


n 
.2 







1—1 ^ "^'l-H ^H ^^ 1^ ^H 1^ J^H^^H 


1 




♦ 










H- 


1— 


(< 














f!!5 


j«^ 


^ 


»^ 


c 


)igit 


izec 


j^ 


"e 


^/^ 



bgle 



40 



FORTY-FOURTH REGISTRATION REPORT. 



[1896. 



n3 

a 



o 
O 



CO 

00 



Q 
O 

GO 

GO 
P 
< 

I 






"IVXOJ, 


c^ 


f-i 


»-H 


JO og ^ g « 
(M 


»- 


»o o: 


^■ 


(N CO CO O Oi f- 


CO <N Ci O CO 
(N «o »-< 

«o 


1 

1 >< 


fe 


. . . IC 

... CO 


CO 


CO'M^^<M5^»-^Cq»OCO00'<!i<-H<MCOCO -^ 
(M ^ CO ^ O • 
— CO • 


» 


^ 


<M ^ ^ — 


^ rr G»< 

00 


CO L^ 


O 00 


3^1 O 


r-i o: 


-.O O (N 
CO 


g.€1 

<! = « 

OD 

IS 




-— 


- 




— 


-- 


~ 


: : 




;- 


!— 




-.— 


;- 












CO 


— ; 




— 




— 


- 


- 










^ 










^ 






















(M ^ . 


; *2 

1 ^-f 


^ 








^ : 


. o 

CO 














—• 








CO I- • • 


a^ 








»-i CO 


CO 




; ^ 


















• x> -ri • 


fe 








5^ ^ 


CO 
OC 






; ; 






. CO 


r- 








CO • • 


>; 




CO O 




.— 


i^~ri 'N 




^ (M 












i 
4 


fe 




-- 


~i>« 


(>1 ^ c^ 






■ ^ 












;^ 






CO 


• l"^ 




. ^ ^ 




1 










^ 00 c^ • 

CO 


Em 

553 










• 






• ^ cc 




- 


. ^- " 


'N 


— 


^ CO -^ . . 
^ TM l^ — • 


20 i 30 ' 40 
to 30. to 40. ■ to 50. 


fe 




'- 




rr . 




^ 






TM 
"(>< ^ 


~(N 






— 


. CO • 

• n • 

"Too"' . 

• CO • 


G^" 







-- 


00 ^'"' 


-- 


~ 


"- 


-] 






1(0 'N 

~i^ :o — 




-^ . . 










O 
CO 




Pm 




















. 7M ^ -1 




t-H f— 1 






S 


^ 




o . 




— 








-M . 










-M 




"2 

S 
' "J" 






- 




— '^ 














. Gvi 










. 00 . 


- T 




"* ^ 














; '- 










^ Oi • 




\ '- 


— 






-- 






^ 


CS 




— 








•^ 






•^ 


-- 






•* 








C^ 


^ 








CO 




















-^ 


— " 


: ^ 






o 




s 








(>< 














— * 




'-^ 


• -^ 






o . 1 


fe 




— 




^ 








— 


— 




; 


" ^ 






CO . 




?? 




-- 














'-' 








o 






fe 




ri 










- 


- 








— 




00 




^ 05 




5S 










- 


— 


— 




-- 








^ 






o 




1 » 

1 -2 

"-gS; 
1 <o 


E^; 








^" 










-^ 






CO 




1^ 




















- 




- 


- 








GC 








^ 


















'^ 














Ci 




>=i 
































CO 




^ o 




fe 
^ 




— 


- 


"- 


























o 




• 00 


: ^ 


1 C^ 












■*C3 


3 

.2 
-'3 

CD 




c^ 






CO 




3^ 00 


; • 


CAUSES OF DEATH. 




3 

a 

o 
.22 

2 

O 


O 


15 
o 


2 


"c 

2 


^2 
'c 
a 

a 

3 


03 

b 
< 

O 


.5 

.22 

C 


> 

c 

c 

oi 

C 


2 

E 


! .2 

'c 


1 


I 

Die 


1 

jitiz 




'5 

c 


D.Z 

51 


P 

2 

a 


■> c 

J a 

'I 


a 
a 

e 
a 



c 

a 

a 


• 08 

• O 

'. '5l 

• 2 

> "^ 
} ^ 
s o 

i B 

i a. 

i 3 
-P-. 



1896.] 



CAUSES OF DEATH. 



41 



•■IVJ.OJQ 

i 


<M Tj4 CO tH O t^ -N 


-H 


(N 




»-H 


-* 


»-H 


CO 


" 


o CO Tji »«:> CO 

•— < 


tH 


<N CO <N 

f-H 




^ 


! ^ .' * I ', ^ 


. ' ^ • 00 (N • 




-H L^ (N 5^ ^ -N 


• r-i rl 


•o 

• CO 


. CO 


-«i1 iO >l ^ Th rH (M 


-1 


fe 
S 





'- 


- 


- 


;- 


- 


— 


;- 


;— 


--- 


;— 


— 


— 


f 


^ 


c 


_— 


-- 














;- 


;— 


;-- 


;- 


'— 


— ; 


8° 


fe 
^ 




— 


- 


— 


;- 


- 




— 






— 


;- 


;— 


- 


-1 


^ 










.— 














;^' 










^ 












— 


- 


— 


- 






^i 




— 


— 


--- 


-- 


5^ 


(N 


















^ 




• 


















- 


- 




i-H 1-H 


'N 






i 


^1 
^1 










rji (?^ 










^H 






1 






-; 


»-H 








• 










•^ 






^ 


•^ -« 




[ ', 


-1 


T-r 






^ 






^H 


'^ ^ ; 


- 


- 


- 


• 






t-H 

1 










i-H 1-H »-i 


1—1 


— ' 










^ ^ 


'1 


^1 






^ 


1--* 






1 














— ; 




~(M 






f-^ 




^ 




(>< . 








^ 








^H 






-. 


^ 




• 


K 


^1 




-■ 


'^ 


-N • 




















-N . 


1 




i-H • 


• 


•^ • 








- 








^ 














• 


, 


^t 


^1 






^ 


^H 






- - 


- 






-M 




- 






^H 


•^ 


, 






i-H • 


- 


~_~ — 


*-* 


'-' 


1-^ 


»— 1 








CO 


^ 


10 15 
to 15. to 20. 




-- 


— ; 


- 


























^ 














^: 


- 


• 




















_^-_ 


- 


— 










— ^ 


5^1 

"co 














s| 


^ 















- — 


^ : 


'^ 












5 
to 10. 

M. F. 














~^ " 


— 






















- 




- 


- 








^ i s| 





-- 


- 


— 




-* 































- 


.- 


- 


'— 


- 


— 


— !- 


"2 


^1 




— . 












— 


— 


- 


— . 


'N 


-- 


'-^ 


-' 


-", 


— ' 












o 
























^ 






















' 


- 


;- 


■- 


;- 


;- 




1^ . ^ 1 





— 




















»— 1 1-H 






>^l 


S^l" 


— 


-- 


- 


- 










^1 


' -N 














'- ; 
























'^ 




CAUSES OF DEATH. 




c; 


2 


• c 

c/: 

c 


"2 

c 
p: 


: £ 

. 2 

' £ 

3 = 

> a 




' c 

OS 

E 




• c 

• 

il 

> c 


£ 

) C 


c 
c 


- a 
1 


1 or 

• *- 

c 

i 
c 


09 

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42 



FORTY-FOURTH REGISTRATION REPORT. 



[1896. 



n3 



as 

00 



w 

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Digitized by VjOOQIC 



44 



FORTY-FOURTH REGISTRATION REPORT. 



[1896. 





§ 




CO 




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100.00100.00 

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2,957 

2,938 

19 

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1,152 

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II ; ?:'=' gg ■» g-" 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



1896.] 



CLASSIFICATION AND PERCENTAGE. 



45 



f2 


SSSSigS 


i5 


!S :8 


?2 


5 • 


. . . t- 
. . .©I 


d 


COOO'^t-O 

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r- 00 tH Tf t* r-i 


s 


SSS 


§J=Sg 


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Tt« 


OJCO-^iOt* 




« " 


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c<i 


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§ 


■^SiOiOsoJ • 




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TJ4 .<M 


§ 


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cc 


OOOJi-lt-O • 




a j-^ 


■^ 








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CO ;o "^ 


^ 


co» 


:gii§ 


CO 


COCO-^OC* 


T-l 


CO -^ 

rH 


TT 




tH 


s 


SSsgggS? 


S5S 


S 


ss 


:SSS 


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CO t-CO CO iO 




Tf CO 


CO 




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s 


§2§§SS5 


g 


'^00)00 


s 


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§S§?2 


03 


l>CD3DOCO 




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CO 


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O CO 00 CO -^ 00 T-i 


§? 


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00 '»o 




CO f* 
CO» 


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CO 


OS CO -^t- CO 




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to 

CO 



1> C* »0 0> CO 1-1 



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30.62 

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2.09 




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QOaDODXCOCOOOaQQO 

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CO*OC*Oil>*i5G^CO 



a. . 03 

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Digitized by VjOOQIC 



46 



FORTY-FOURTH REGISTRATION REPORT. 



[1896. 



T3 
CO 



.s 

o 
o 
O 



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'S^xmoo ia)8]js 



'X'janoo in^H 



-BOMOJ, 



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s 



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iCOCQObiO 



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ICCCrnO . O O r-i tH CO Tt« 



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')91l0O8aOO^ 



'X^nnoo ao^iSaiqsii^^ 



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c^i-taoo'#i>T-i«ooocD 


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Digitized by VjOOQIC 



1896.] 



CLASSIFICATION AND PERCENTAGE. 



47 







: :ig : : :s :§ : 


Oft 








^ : 




: : : : : i*^ : 


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co?5<S 


Si: 










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tH • 




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COOJ 


JO C^ 'C^S^iOCMC^C- 


gg 




CO 

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CO • 




tH 




iC 






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g£ 


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C5 


CO —00 • 
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tH . • 


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w 

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05 
CO 



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Digitized by VjOOQ IC 



48 



FORTY-FOURTH REGISTRATION REPORT. 



[1896. 



a 

a 
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^g.j-.*^„ 


fCO 


'A^O ;JodM9K 




00 00 1-1 ■ iO • 


rH ^ 


SUMOX "00 ?J0dM8K 


. . . ^ CO 


: : : :^®* 


• 1—1 


•X^anoo ^ua^ 


,-. T-l lO • '?0 
• 00 


.-•00 »-HTtH . . 
1-4 • • 


1-1 tH 


•iJ^anoo lo^sua 


ni:~:4.;-«j u. . * -» 


nr^crlp^ 



1896.J 



CI,A8SIPICATI0N AND PERCENTAGE. 



49 







-^ '^ ""i^ OS • 






:!§i§ 








■ft 

OS 






'^^ '^ '^ S (M 

to ' ' ' ci 






ggsss 


5 


s 


r^«. 












CO W t-H O -^ lO 00 ^^ GO 

' ' ' aid ' ' ' ' 






1.32 

1.32 

1.32 

.66 




g 


s .s 














s 




CO CO CO CO • 

tH f-H TH 










*.«. 














1 








s 




S2 


§3§I2 


*. 








g§§s 






^ 


.30 
4.28 
1.22 


CO 


S§ 






O 
CO 




: :§. 




2.45 
.92 
.30 








oao«> wco 

r-t i-H 


^^^ 


~.** 




§s 


05 CO CO CO 50 t^ CO • 

• • '^ CO CO TP Th OS t-* . 

• • * 'WtH * * • 






ci --* »-i* 






. *cj* * • " : * 


.^ 




§§ 




; 






OS 00 
r-i CO 


2S§2 


OS 






COC4 


cot- CO 

tH tH 


g 








o»co 






.§ 






' ' ' ' ai ' ' 


: 



^rpOSt-fiOOlOCOOSi— t-i-HOSOOOST-HOTt* 
OOCOJ>"^C^COO*d-'COr-400lCO(MOT-iO 



OONOOCQCOCOO- 



I 

I: 



o c 



Q q3 .2 .22 c .2 .2 
fc S a5 Q> ^ is z: 

•S >> C fl 28 03 CS 

ccwwpoo 



CO ao 



?§5gS''^'=°5 



•:2 c3 



§ Soq 



a cs 



3^ 



is 



"fe. 






CQ 



to 



^J« 



5 



09 00 



'- ^ vj o z> -^ k^.ri .^ jli w 






T-iCOr-iCDiO£>£>COCOO'?0 
CQO}T-i(M£>I>OOT-iOO 







TH <M iC CO O • C^i • . • . f. lO 


•-- th.COCO(Mt-i»--COCO'' 






""I* T-i CO CO CO .-rr -CM • -COO • 


* * 


• T-,Oi -tHOIOth tH 




C000C0(MO2'^Q0^i>OC0ir5i>0S^T^»-^ 
GV| i-« T-l CO CO T-i tH T-l 


C0i-lXt-O^»rHT^0i 

^ THCOCO'«1< ^ 






tH i-H r-i O 0< ••n'r-iCO • G^J 1-4 CO • 

TH TH . 


(Mt-I 


• • CO <M (M O OS CO TH . 






^ -r-t^^ .(M .tHth . .|C . 


'^ .* 


. . ^ . . 00 CO TH . . 


T-l 


• OS OS CO CO CO 1-1 OO •ooei 'CO-^w 


-^ • 


•(NCOCO "^OSThTHt-. 
• CO tH 






THOi<MOTII .COWtH . .THTH . 




• ^ • • t-. O »0 OS -CO 






0*0*<MtH . . . . (M . tH • »-t . 




• • r-i • <M C^ CI r-i . 






-^^ y~> UiiO 'CO 'CO • 1-H TH CO . 




OtOly-^Oi^COiO'-^^ 






• TH 1— 1 tH O^ . .jOtHtH . • . rH tH 


. ^ I 


•GQ • • . CJ T-t TH O* lO 



Digitized by VjOOQ IC 



50 



FORTY-FOURTH REGISTRATION REPORT. 



[1896. 



.s 

a 
o 



CO 

00 



O 
H 

o 

CCS 
Q 

O 
I— I 



GO 
OQ 

I 

H 



,1 « 

I 55 



•i^unoo lo^spa 


: -M 






:§ ; 


\i(jnnoo ^nax 


• • 1-4 








•BUAkOX 




-- 


;S : : : 


•A%10 !>J(XlM8K 


■ • « 




o* t- c>» 


•8UMOX 




S 


S5g 


•siiB^ TBJ^aoo 


: § 


■ «c 


i : : 


"lailon^MBj 


:SS 




;s 


.SS 


'A%\o aouepjAOJd 


<N ^ iC O 


§^2 


• CO — * 


•;911008UOOAV 


^ . 


• • • 


.£;unoo uo^SumsuM 


■ ;o CO 




§ 


:§ : 




Digitized by VjOOQIC 



1896.] 



CLASSIFICATION AND PERCENTAGE, 



51 

















• i^« . w^ 






wo 


iO 












. , 


















•(MOO •*00 






''^ 


-!j< 












• • 


















•Oii-H -rtl 




















• [ 


















.«t-r-iOyO*Or-lf— COr-iTH 










c- 








___. 














) OS 00 3>» • • t- ' • ' 






























« 


. 












. 
















• <M <M • *0 TO 




• os • 
































• t-CO -CDtH 




;^ I 
































•THCi -OS 35 




CO CO 00 










S : 


. 
















• r-n> .aoi> 




lOlCiC 


























.f '(M 




• j 










\ 


















iO "Tt« CO t» CO tH 5Q 


• -rr »--*> • 






t- t^ <^ 


lO 


f^ 
















TH rH OS O lO rH 3Q 


• -^ooo • 






ooc 


• tH 


O 
















1> COtH 




























CQIOCO-^CO -OCQ • -O 






•CQ 


■ O O 
















•COC-OGOO 


.COOS • 


CO 








•Ci 


•CO 00 
















• i-H GQ tH rH rH 












. ^_H 






•_ 










• tH 


























CO 00 io • o oa 


CO —CO 








coco 


• 00 
















r-iCQOS .OSO 


l-H 00 CO 








THOO 


•CO • • 
















00 tH • CO (M - 
















*>o 










CO — CiOOf-COOCOOOT-iTt<-^ 






i>oo 


• CO CO 00 




OrH 










i-lOCOT-iri4t-OTHlOT^(M-^ 






OthtH 


•tHtHO 














IC 


.-H (Mt- 

> co~^^"o: 




' iC 


























o»a 




OS -co 






•OS 


osos . 
















t-iCOtH -iOO 




lOl-H 


JO 








1-4 


• TH r-» • 
















l>i-< -oow 
































tH 
































CO CO CD • CO CQ 




CQ lO 


CO 








(M 


CQ • 
















Cvt ® C^ • O^ O 




iOO 


Oi 








iO • 


• o 


















CO •« 




1-1 


















CO"^ 








■ 


(Mcocoio<MX'T-iCicooa»«oo 






lO t' CO r-t i> CO Tji 1 




oo 










TH(MCOT-nO*CTHOiOTfT-i<M 






O thOO tH O O 1 














t-T-l COtH 
































fl 


ft 

i 



o 


o 


i 

Q 
1 

l-H 


l4 


1 


1 


h 

1* 


Convulsions 

Cyanosis 

Dfibilitv Tnf«ntilft 


s 

1 


t 
si 

i| 

s E 
si 


j 

fl 


■ oa 

§1 

"is 

i-hCC 


CO 

1 

1 


1 

1 

1 


1 

i 


.2 


c 

« 


t 

at 


1 Post partem Haemorrhage 

8 Puerperal Eclampsia 

5 Puerperal Peritonitis. . . . 
3; Vomiting of Pregnancy. . 




<MCO 










05 10 


(M tH ri4 OS X" «> O 


t>l-tl-l 






-^ 


00 lO 














SS^i;:^ --«-^« 






1-4 


tH 




tH 




W -«11 . »H 


<M • 


.<M . . 
















T-i C9 CO . »0 tH 




00 TH 00 








1-1 • 


• TH f-l • 






. 










oi :'*^ : 
















""•'^'^"^ 




«co 










-^ 00 OS ^ CO tH (M 


Tl<l>C<»J> 


CQ 






WCOM 














•^ CO t> O TH rH r-i 
























1-1 — 0» -TtlCO .i-HiOG^ 




^ 


i-i(M • 


•d 


















10i-4 -(M ^ • 










Th 










•f-OSiOOO • 1-1 00 • 


tH 










• 1-4 


'"' 
















OIOCOtHOOOCO •CO'-i-H . 






TH tH TH 


•<M • 


1-^ 
















OiTH -iSjIl-H 


tH * 


























• t^CO • tH 00 • 


•<MCQOl 












tH • • 


















.<M .-1 , 


































•■^lO .0(M • 




CO • . • 






























•tH • tH 






















• C<» O iH 00 C4 CO t-» r-i ''I* ^ tH 




'^ 


• tH 


















• IC 


r|4 .C 


cq 








•iH • 


T-l 




c 


igit 


ze 


•dt5 


vGg 


>d 



52 



FORTY-FOURTH REGISTRATION REPORT. 



[1896. 



I Q 



^3 
<D 



.s 

a 
o 
O 

I. 

CO 
05 
00 



GO 

o 
I 

I— I 

< 



•i^nnoo lo^BiJa 


CO 


■ m 


00 • • • 


•X^onoo ^U9H 


COtH 


ss,s 






: :S 


s ;s ; 


•i^lO UOdM9iI 






s ; ; ; 

• 1-H • • • 


•8UMOX 




§5gS 


5 • ; '• 




1 
1 

5.19 3.97 
.49 .9> 

1 


:S§ 


:S ; : : 


1^00 i*-!*^ •; . : 




"i^^;l,oo»««^oooo 



§l?g§s§ss 






.9* 



CD *w<- 









a tX3 






P 

5z; 



\^:junoo uo^uiqBBAV 


CO 00 1-1 


i-Hi-H-^i* .00 




•^^a^oosuooM 


T-l • 


THr-l .-r-lO* 




A'wo aouopiAOJj 


s§** 


i-H i> e» rt< « « -^ -^ 


•^93[0n^BJ 


S" : 


ooc« ;i-"-« 




•SUB J I^J^xiao 


ccoo • 


«T-I • 


o« 




i;unoo9DU9piAOja 


s;:^ 


^•TttOd 


t- 




•X^jlO :mo(Im9K 




•COC9 


»o 




•SUMOJ, 00 :>JOClM9K 


0000 • 


. .^ . 


t-l 


• »^ • 


•iC^unoo %U9^ 


«co^ 


^c»^ 


« 




•icjnnoo lo^iJa 


OOr-l . 


. .00 


1 I 





Digitized by VjOOQIC 



1896.] 



CLASSIFICATION AND PEBOENTAGE. 



53 



uiio»a 





.34 
1.89 

.17 

.17 

.86 
1.20 




• g 


s 






CO Ob 


CO 


^ 


S5§ 

1-4 


.^ ^^. 




§ 










5§ 


^ :S 


.13 

.64 

1.59 

.08 

.67 

.64 
.64 








aa 








rHTH 


^ ^ 




tH 






I'sl 



Cm 

I" 
I 



C6 






I 
I- 
I 



« a 
p 



3 3 



"^Sg ^ § §^ 


.^^ .0* i-i . 


. .CO tH -co 




•00 00 


G4 .CO 


•1-i • 


; : I"* 


C4CO0D 

tH 


00 ^co 


TH .CO 


r-l • tH 


. . i-i 


r-l • • 


•«l-l l-H tH IOC- 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



54 



POBTY-FOURTH REGISTRATION REPORT. 



[1896. 



Table X. — Causes of Deaths Registered in RJiode Island, 






I. 

TI. 
III. 
IV. 

V. 



II. 



III. 



IV. 



V. 



CAI^SES OF DEATH.* 



1858. 



1854. 1855. 1856. 



1857. 



ALL CAUSES 1,291 1,800 1,970 2,225: 2,510 

I 
SPECIFIED CAUSES 1,176 1,665 1,782 1,919| 2,222 



[CLASSES.] 
ZYMOTIC DISEASES.... 



(CONSTITUTIONAL DISEASES.. 

LOCAL DISEASES 

DEVELOPMENTAL DISEASES. 
VIOLENT DEATHS 



[GROUPS.] 

1. COMMFKICABLE DI8RAAE8. 

2. DiETIC DI8EA8E8 

8. Parasitic Diseases 



1. Diathetic Diseases., 



Diseases op— 

1. Nervous System 

2. Organs op Circulation 

8. Respiratory Organs 

4. Digestive Organs 

5. Urinary Organs 

6. Organs op Generation 

7. Organs op Locomotion 

8. Integumentary System 

9. Org. op Spec. Sense. Eye and Ear 

Developmental Diseases op— 

1. Children 

2. Women 

8. Old People 

4. Diseases op Nutrition 



1. Accident or Negligence. 

2. Battle 

8. Homicide 

4. Suicide 



Causes Ill-depined.. 



Causes not stated.. 



504 
67 
884 
208 



489 
14 

1 



67 



101 
29 
46 

142 



122 
10 

58 
18 



604 682 820, 

88 

440' 

510' 

61 



804 
15 

1 



11 
48 
93 

158 
10 
6 



5H 


. 


580 


476 


857 


482 


56 


74 


588 
11 
5 


668 

8 
6 



68; 68 



90' 

40 

62 

876 

4 

4' 

1, 

8, 



1261 
661 
72j 

186 
13, 

^; 



255 



842 

I 9 

67 84 
47 



58 



56 



15 



100 



181 



19 



14 



924 
106 
549 
561 



106 



158 
67 

188 



876 
13 

119 
58 



78 



1858. 1859. 



2,4881 2,164 



I 



1,124 

1121 

564| 
506 1 
87 



166 
671 
1011 
198 
17| 



408 
24 

114 
55 



78 



290 



915 
96 
552 
534 
89 



1,088 I 
26' 
10 5 



112 



164 
64 
94 

196 
23 



858 

14 
117 
48 



79 



241 



1860. 



2,793' 2,447; 2,858 



1,078 
131 
632 
657 
1&5 

1,088 

29 

6 

181 



170 

73 

110 

2S3 

29 

1 

5 

11 



476 
18 

116 
52 



119 



4 
12 



87 



188 



» Stillborn included in this table. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



1896.] 



CAUSES OF DEATH. 



55 



for each of the Forty four years, 1853 to 1896, 



1861. 


1862. 


1863. 


1864. 


1865. 


1866. 


1867. 


1868. 


1869. 


1870. 


1871. 


1872. 


1873. 


1874. 


1875. 


8,078 


2,714 


3,818 


3,498 


3,582 


3,142 


3,052 


3,124 


3,602 


8,472 


3,567 


4.449 


4,631 


4,506 


4,568 


2,858 


2,505 


3,081 


8.255 


3,335 


2.938 


2,827 


2,78^ 


3,251 


8,276 


3,275 


8,986 


4,814 


4,297 


4,800 


1,198 


1,032 


1,278 


1,477 


1,543 


1,172 


1,068 


1,098 


1,418 


1,268 


1,265 


1,877 


1,689 


1,690 


1,657 


186 


122 


141 


128 


189 


132 


123 


130 


144 


167 


151 


187 


198 


155 


198 


768 


660 


925 


855 


885 


804 


809 


666 


753 


767 


844 


1,081 


1,090 


1,108 


1,104 


653 


584 


612 


684 


715 


698 


710 


784 


879 


985 


890 


1.195 


1,211 


1,199 


1,175 


108 


107 


125 


116 


103 


182 


122 


115 


122 


189 


125 


146 


156 


150 


171 


1,156 


1,002 


1,235 


1,437 


1,525 


1,160 


1,048 


1,076 


1,390 


1,242 


1,235 


1,858 


1,670 


1,662 


1,682 


34 


24 


86 


31 


10 


7 


11 


11 


20 


20 


19 


28 


14 


25 


18 


8 


6 


7 


9 


8 


5 


9 


6 


8 


6 


11 


1 


5 


3 


7 


126 


122 


141 


123 


189 


182 


128 


130 


144 


167 


151 


187 


198 


155 


198 


213 


170 


2as 


217 


202 


207 


245 


208 


238 


249 


277 


299 


351 


812 


336 


108 


113 


99 


124 


99 


117 


115 


116 


128 


120 


146 


190 


193 


217 


191 


119 


104 


140 


140 


127 


99 


92 


74 


90 


106 


123 


150 


156 


164 


191 


261 


230 


427 


826 


864 


883 


285 


194 


232 


217 


220 


387 


267 


288 


268 


27 


25 


85 


28 


26 


29 


43 


46 


46 


48 


57 


77 


85 


85 


85 


9 


1 


8 


1 


4 


1 


1 


2 


...... 


1 




5 


8 


8 


1 


15 


8 


9 


7 


5 


5 


6 


12 




15 


5 


11 


18 


15 


16 


17 


9 


9 


12 


8 



13 


22 


14 


8 


11 


16 


12 


17 


24 


16 


440 


371 


890 


426 


498 


454 


455 


515 


528 


647 


566 


857 


844 


868 


834 


19 


23 


21 


23 


18 


24 


26 


22 


27 


28 


34 


86 


29 


44 


35 


182 


148 


161 


193 


152 


178 


188 


206 


217 


204 


232 


233 


254 


223 


216 


62 


47 


40 


42 


47 


42 


41 


41 


52 


56 


58 


69 


84 


79 


90 


93 


91 

7 

1 


104 
8 
5 


106 
2 
2 


90 

1 


119 

1 
1 


102 


97 


105 


lor 


106 


126 


145 


128 


142 


8 


5 




2 


5 




2 


3 


4 


3 


12 


8 


18 


6 


'***i2 


11 


15 


"■"is 


15 


27 


""19 


18 


8 


18 


26 


18 


21 


20 


34 


40 


83 


30 


48 


. 51 


59 


48 


87 


70 


57 


56" 


202 


188 


217 


209 


207 


171 


195 


288 


800 


137 


249 


876 


217 


152 


207 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



56 



FOBTY-FOURTH REQI8TRATION REPORT. 



[1896. 



Table X. — Causes of Deaths Begisiered in Rhode Island, 



CAUSES OP DEATH. » 



I. 
II. 
III. 

IV. 

V. 



ALL CAUSES 

SPECIFIED CAUSES.. 



[CLASSES.] 
ZYMOTIC DISEASES.... 



III. 



IV. 



CONSTITUTIONAL DISEASES.. 

LOCAL DISEASES 

DEVELOPMENTAL DISEASES.. 
VIOLENT DEATHS 



[GROUPS.] 

1. Communicable Diseabcb . 

2. DiBTIC D1BBA8E8 

3. Parasitic Diseasbb 



1. Diathetic Dibeabbb.. 



DiBBABES OP— 

1. Nbrvoub System 

2. Groans op Circulation 

8. Rebpiratory Organs 

4. DioESTivE Organs 

5. Urinary Organs 

6. Organs op Generation 

7. Organs op Locomotion 

8. Integumentary System 

9. Org. op Spec. Sense. Eye and Ear 

Developmental Diseases op— 
1 . Children 

1 2. Women 

18. Old People 

4. Diseases op Nutrition 



V. 



1. Accident OR Negligence. 

2. Battle 

8. Homicide 

4. Suicide 



Causes Ill-depined. 



Causes not stated. 



1876. 1877. 



_L 



4,840 
4,095 

1,618 

199 

1,110 

1«090 

158 



1,581 

27 

5 



199 



346 

168 
191 
284 

69 
2 

27 



671 
80 



78 



181 



218 



4,692 
4,444 

1,819 

281 

1,217 

1,016 

160 



1,794 
17 

8 



281 



875 

187 

191 

885 

98 

4 

15 

12 



684 
29 
218 



187 
***8 



56 



192 



1878. 



4,689 
4,480 

2,000 
186 

1,126 
960 
159 



1,978 
16 
6 



185 



861 
172 
206 
264 
92 
1 

10 
20 



648 
26 



64 



185 



210 



1879. 



I 



4,688 

4,886 

I 

1,867 
221 

1,246 
926 
127 



1,849 
16 
2 



221 



414 
206 
208 
270 
118 



1880. 



1881. 



591 
86 

220 
79 



lis 



5,021 
4,742 

1,970 
205 

1,128 

m 



1,919 
21 



415 
287 

210 
278 
119 

7 
15 

7 



48 



^4 



706 

86 

278 

107 



146 



1883. 



5,280 
4,878 

! 
I 

1,877| 

289 

1,461, 

ItllO, 

182! 



1,846, 

29< 

2 



481 
271 



110 
8 
11 



5,827 1 
6,011 i 

1,T76| 

218 

1,558 

1.254 

215 



1,742 

82 

2 



218 



484 
252 
214 
487 

118 
6 
25 
17 



46 



752 
881 
247 1 

821 



I 



41 
231 



55 



347 



843 
22 



106 



1551 178 



45 



271 



5,585 
5,827 

1,889 

260 

1,770 

1,273 

185 



1,795 
42 
2 



260 



500 



445 

178 



26 
19 



44 
275 
ISO 



157 



8 
25 



186 



> Stillborn included in this table. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



1896.] 



CAUSES OP DEATH. 



67 



for each of the Forty-four years^ 186S to 1896. — Contintied. 





























Total and 


1884. 


1885. 


1886. 


1887. 


1888. 


1889. 


1890. 


1891. 


1892. 


1893. 


1894. 


1895 


1896. 


Peroentage 
for 40 years. 












; 














1853-1892. 


5,413 


5,660 


6,142 


6,616 


6,889 


1 

6,588 7,230 


6,892 


7,789 


7,852 


7,552 


7,902 


1 
7,928 

1 


170,929 


100.00 


5,852 


5,544 


6,052 


6.562 


6,815 


6.500, 7,142 

1 


6,823 


7,677 


7,753 


7,495 


7,819 


7,858 


162,140 


94.86 


1,808 


1,924 


2,121 


2,394 


2,335 


2,025 


2,427 


2,201 


2,464 


2,548 


2,425 


2,563 


2,427 


61,816 


85.87 


253 


296 


262 


264 


307 


812 


299 


288 


305 


825 


291 


300 


^85 


7,291 


4.27 


1,705 


1,883 


2,018 


2,174 


2,258 


2,274 


2,356 


2,831 


2,596 


2,701 


2,672 


2,814 


2,870 


47,581 


27.81 


1,370 


1,260 


1,448 


1,506 


1,699 


1,646 


1,789 


1,784 


1,980 


1,891 


1,819 


1,812 


1,935 


89,888 


23.88 


221 


201 


213 


224 


216 


248 


271 


274 


832 


288 


288 


330 


386 


6,119 


8.58 


1,768 


1,877 


2,084 


2,847 


2,294 


1,949 


2,865 


2,130 


2,405 


2,465 


2,366 


2,625 


2,881 


60,019 


85.11 


38 


47 


35 


46 


40 


74 


61 


69 


59 


8vJ 


58 


88 


46 


1,127 


.66 


2 


296 


2 

262 


1 
264 


1 
307 


2 
312 


1 
299 


2 

283 


305 


1 
825 


1 
291 






170 
7,291 


.10 


258 


300 


285 


4.27 


506 


52T 


598 


618 


642 


554 


612 


607 


660 


682 


748 


790 


760 


18,512 


7.90 


2d3 


858 


888 


411 


442 


467 


413 


485 


509 


535 


476 


535 


556 


8,063 


4.72 


234 


299 


805 


846 


863 


402 


423 


878 


465 


438 


363 


383 


871 


7,462 


4.87 


421 


393 


495 


527 


516 


541 


553 


513 


595 


628 


600 


581 


595 


13,113 


7.68 


178 


215 


2-^ 


220 


244 


272 


300 


300 


324 


377 


897 


481 


472 


4,038 


2.86 


14 


14 


12 


14 


10 


10 


8 


15 


15 


20 


32 


48 


53 


223 


.12 


82 


34 


26 


28 


15 


18 


25 


20 


17 


14 


19 


28 


22 


556 


.82 


27 


23 


22 


20 


26 


10 22 


13 


10 


5 


27 


17 


36 


565 


.88 




















2 
1,467 


10 
1,497 


11 

1,490 


5 

1,598 






918 


843 


1,000 


1,053 


1,217 


1,161 


1,329 


1,809 


1,486 


27,842 


15.99 


89 


28 


81 


29 


83 


27 


26 


23 


47 


50 


62 


40 


44' 


1,057 


.62 


298 


267 


276 


278 


290 


227 


198 


185 


256 


188 


187 


282 


293 


7,927 


4.64 


126 


122 

178 


136 
194 


146 
206 


159 
190 


231 240 


217 
238 


241 
309 


191 
264 


73 

234 






8,557 
5,858 


2.08 


197 


216 


250 


298 


296 


8.18 




























14 
105 


.01 


2 


8 


2 


2i 5 


8 


2 


i 


4 


3 


9 


6 


2I 


.06 


22 


20 


17 


16 


21 


24 


19 


40 


19 21 


45 


31 


38 


647 


.88 


19 


57 


39 


35 


46 


49 


45 


35 


84 31 


2 


31 


46 


1,550 


.90 


42 


59 


51 


19 


28 


89 


43 


34 


28 


68 


55 


52 


29 


7,239 


4.24 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



58 



FOBTY-POURTH BEGI8TBATI0N REPORT. 

Table X.— Continued. 



[1896. 



1 


CAUSES OF DEATH. 


1858. 


1864. 


1865. 


1866. 


1857. 


1858. 


1860. 


1880. 


I. 


Group 1. 
1. Varicella 




















2. Fever, Typhus 




1 


......|...... 










8. Measles 




15 
46 


8 
71 
5 


2 

208 
9 


6 

147 

1'!**** 


75 

284 

1 

6 


8 

71 

6 

80 


8 




4. Scarlet Fever 


106 
14 


64 




5. Small Pox* 


9 




6. Diphtheria 


67 




7. Quinsy* 






1 


8 




8. Tonsilltis 














9. Carbuncle 






i 

1 '' 


1 

14 
8 


1 
20 


1 

15 
11 






10. Erysipelas 


8 
2 


8 
2 


15 
6 


26 




11. Fever. Puerperal 


g 




12. Sceptioaemia 






18. Glanders 


' 


i 










14. Hydrophobia 


1 






i 1 






1 
6 






16. Malijrnant Pustule 





1 


1 

1 


1 






16. Meningitis, Cerebro Spinal 









17. Tetanus 




» 


8 


4 


6 


1 


8 


5 




18. Cholera 








19. Fever, Malarial 


1 




1 

8 

63 












20. Fever, Remittent* 


1 
25 
2 


— ii 
1 


2 

68 
4 


1 2 

76 

1 ^^ 


4 
42 
6 


1 
70 
2 


1 




21. Fever, Typhoid* 


67 




22. Influenza 


2 




23. Parotitis 






24. Pertussis 


2 

48 


14 
M 


4 
79 


"19 
120 


9 
141 


18 
166 


46 
126 


46 




25. Pneumonia 


162 




26. Gonorrhoea 






27. Syphilis 


1 
33 
6 


5 


1 

68 

8 


47 

7 


62 
11 
4 




8 

65 
11 


8 
2 


2 




28. Hydrocephalus (Tub. Meningitis). . 

29. Scrofula: 


52 
9 




30. Tabes Mesenterioa 


1 




81. Tubercular Menln^ritis 














32. Tubercular Peritonitis 




1 


1 1 








38. Tuberculosis, General 




1 

849 

10 

1 




i 1 








34. Tuberculosis, Pulmonary 


248 

14 


845 

7 

i 

5 

1 


805 

18 

1 
1 

1 


400 
25 


426 
21 


486 
22 


505 




Group 2. 

1 AinnhnHBTn i De^lrlum Tremens. I 

1. Alcoholism, j Intemperance f 

2. Inanition 


26 




8. Purpura and Scurvy 




4 
8 


5 

9 
1 


1 

8 
2 


3 




Group 8. 
1. Thrush 


1 


4 

1 


g 




2. Worms 


3 


II. 


Group 1. 
1. Gout 








2. Dropsy 


45 

2 
13 

1 
4 
2 

28 

22 

12 

4 


81 
6 
18 


82 
4 
27 


50 

4 

26 


48 

6 

87 


""44 
12 
44 

1 
7 
4 

42 
43 
21 

14 

9 

86 


41 

2 

48 


66 
5 




8. Anaemia 




4. Cancer 


44 




5. Noma (Canker) 




6. Mortification (Gangrene) 


2 

1 

19 
25 
6 
6 


3 
2 

26 
38 
20 
8 


4 

19 

39 

9 

14 


8 

25 
42 

21 
16 

1 

8 

45 


8 

7 

20 
61 
28 
16 
2 
6 
41 


10 
16 

41 
51 
32 
11 




7. Rheumatism 


III. 


Group 1. 
1. Cephalitis 




2. Apoplexy and Paralysis, \ 

8. Insanity 




4. Chorea 




5. Epilepsv 


sf 


" "84 


'■■"8 
.31 


6 
80 


4 
31 




6. Brain Diseases^ etc 




7. Nerve Diseases. 




Group 2. 
1. Pericarditis. . . ., 




2 


1 

1 

68 


1 

1 
41 


2 

""es 


i 

66 


1 

1 

62 


8 

1 
69 




2. Aneurism 


1 

28 




8. Heart Diseases^ etc 







»Includes 8 cases of Chicken Pox. ^Includes Mumps, ^jncludep yellow Fever. '♦Includes 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



1896.] CAUSES OF DEATH* 59 

Causes of Deaths Registered in Rhode Island. 



1861. 


1862. 


1863. 


1864. 


1865. 


1866. 


1867. 


1868. 


1869. 


1870. 


1871. 


1872. 


1878. 


1874. 


1875. 


...... 

67 

5 

140 


""ik 
47 

7 
81 

1 


'**36 

91 

7 

155 


" *26 

266 

12 

160 

2 


""ie 

255 
22 

83 

1 


**"i5i'* 'ii 

28 14 

2i 1 

64! 31 

.... 1 


""io 

93 
2 

20 


""19 

286 

3 

33 

1 


"'26 
75 

6 
88 

8 


6 

66 
12 

57 


" "24 
54 

25 

48 


""63 
287 

28 
45 

1 


7 

462 
8 
59 


4 

88 








1 






1 








1 
21 
13 


2 

16 

7 


•is 

8 


1 
25 
12 


2 
14 
10 


1 

21 
16 


2 

18 
18 


9 


1 
39 
17 


""26 
16 
8 


1 


14 

7 


11 
4 


14 
14 


28 
14 


21 

18 

1 














1 










1 
8 




1 






.... 










1 











1 
1 
8 

1 


4 

3 
8 


3 

3 


2 
1 
2 


5 


""ii 
5 


1 
23 
8 


1 

62 

2 


1 
16 

8 








2 

4 


5 
6 


13 


5 


6 


8 


6 






1 


i 

233 

1 




2 

1 
106 




1 








s 








i 

80 
2 


2 
157 


1 

130 


1 
190 

1 


1 
172 

1 






M 
8 


84 
8 


128 
6 


116 
5 


152 

1 


126 

1 


121 
2 


150 
6 












46 


1.5 

147 

1 

8 

50 

14 

3 


24 
174 


81 

201 


56 
175 


28 
193 


12 
172 

1 
5 
41 
9 
2 


26 
191 


48 
190 


39 

182 


25 

218 


27 
229 


32 
284 


45 
250 


81 

400 

1 


5 
68 
14 

8 


8 
47 
18 


5 
49 
14 

8 


2 

63 
Vi 

7 


5 
56 
5 
2 


3 

57 

3 

2 


* * * *76 
11 
10 


5 
51 
19 

4 


6 
71 
22 

5 


9 
44 
9 
5 


3 
52 

20 

7 


7 
51 
20 

3 


8 
57 
21 

4 










:::::: :::::'.:::;: 


:::::: :::):: 


















6 
547 


4 
526 


10 
563 


9 
517 


18 
555 


16 
577 


24 
585 


23 

600 


is' 

584 


21 
685 


8 


6S8 


513 


512 


498 


657 


ao 


22 


82 


27 


10 


7 


10 


10 


■ 18 


17 


17 


23 


14 


22 


17 


4 


2 


4 


4 






1 


1 


a 


8 


2 






8 


1 


4 
4 


4 
2 


8 
4 


8 

1 


5 
3 


2 
3 


8 

1 


4 
2 


3 


4 
2 


11 


i 


5 


2 

1 


5 
2 


48 
8 

58 
1 


46 
4 
61 


52 
12 
62 


45 
4 
61 

1 
5 
7 


61 

3 

55 

"12 

8 


49 
3 

64 
2 
4 

10 


49 
2 

58 


49 
4 
60 


53 

4 
66 


61 
2 

80 


56 
6 

66 
1 
9 

13 


55 
4 

95 
5 
7 

21 


60 

3 

106 

1 

11 
17 


39 
2 

87 

6 

22 


56 
4 

95 
2 


10 
6 


7 
4 


? 


7 

7 


6 

11 


4 
17 


7 
17 


10 
26 


48 
67 
40 
18 


86 
4.S 
86 

7 


54 

62 
81 
10 


49 
54 
42 
15 


89 

45 
20 


46 
56 
36 
18 


52 
72 
52 
14 


40 
57 
54 
18 
1 
5 
88 


54 
69 
48 
14 


42 
64 
66 
18 


44 

77 
79 
16 


57 
58 
67 
26 


109 
67 
67 
19 


60 
70 
86 
18 


66 
67 
99 
32 


ii 

48 


6 
42 


6 
40 




8 

54 


7 
36 


4 
52 


12 
43 


5 

48 


4 
55 


10 
51 


i.3 

78 


15 

74 


16 
67 


20 
52 


3 








1 
"**98 






















1 
105 


2 

111 


****99 


1 
128 


1 
116 


1 
114 


'"lie 




"128 


8 
117 


2 

144 


1 
189 


2 

191 


1 
216 


4 

187 



Bilious, Typhus and Continued Fevers. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



60 



FORTt-FOURTH REGISTRATION REPORT. [1^96. 

Table X.— Continued. 





CAUSES OF DEATH. 


1876. 


1877. 


1878. 


1879. 


1880. 


1881. 


1888. 


1888. 


L 


Group 1. i 
1. Varicella i 
















2. Fever, Typhus 


1 














8. Meaales 

4. Scarlet Fever 


4 

80 

1 

159 


11 

62 

5 

492 


81 
86 

1 
485 

8 


-iij 

859 


9 
468 

"162 
1 


87 

138 

8 

816 

2 


6 

45 

2 

101 


14 
84 

2 
95 

8 




6. Small Pox» 


fl. Diphtheria 

7. Quinsy* 


8. TonsUitls 




9. Carbuncle 

10. Erysipelas 

1 1. Fever, Puerperal, 

Vi. Septicemia 


18 


8 
21 
17 


""17 
17 
8 


1 

85 

9 

2 


'"17 
16 


8 

87 
22 

1 


i 

80 

28 


8 

28 
16 
S 


18 Glanders 




. .... 

2 
2 

8 


14. Hydrophobia 

15. Malismant Pustule 


« 


8 


'■'*** 














1 

18 
8 


1 
88 
8 




16. Meningitis, Cerebro Spinal 

17. Tetanus 

18. Cholera 


7 
2 


11 
8 


10 
6 


'"'so 

8 


86 
8 


19. Fever, Malarial 




1 








1 

9 

117 

8 


8 


81 


20. Fever, Remittent* 




1 
186 


2 

101 
4 


4 

141 




21 Fever, Typhoid* 

22 Influenza 


128 


128 

1 


214 

1 


289 


m. Parotitis 






24 Pertussis 

SJ5. Pneumonia 

20. Gonorrhoea 

'/: Syphilis 

28. Hydrocephalus (Tub. Meningitis).. 

5i9. Scrofula 

80. Tabes Mesenterica 


48 
889 
2 
8 
68 
18 
5 


82 
226 
2 
10 
55 
11 
10 


■"■54 
817 


■43 
811 


80 
864 


68 

887 

8 

4 

56 
15 
8 


71 
844 


9 
400 


4 
70 

'I 


10 
57 
18 
8 


10 

46 

12 

8 


16 
49 
14 
4 


18 
54 
82 
5 


81. Tubercular Laryngitis 


82. Tubercular Meningitis 


















88. Tuberculosis, (Jeneral 


18 
680 

21 

1 
5 

4 
1 


25 
665 

12 


27 
685 

15 


86 
645 

15 


12 
652 

15 


89 
712 

24 

2 
8 

1 
1 


27 
744 

27 

1 
4 

2 


29 
766 

29 
10 




34. Tuberculosis, Pulmonary 




Group 2. 

1 Ainnhniinm i Dcllrlum TremcDS. I 

1. Alcoholism, -j Intemperance f 

2. Inanition 




8. Purpura and Scurvy 


5 
8 


1 

4 
2 


1 

1 
1 


6 


8 





Group 8. 
1. Thrush 




2. Worms 




n. 


Group 1. 
1. Gout 








2 Dropsy 

8. Anaemia 

4. Cancer 

5. Noma (Canker) 


66 

2 

106 


68 

1 
185 


88 

2 

119 

1 

9 

16 

81 
103 
86 
22 


50 

8 

125 

1 

18 

24 

79 
137 
83 
17 


87 

8 

125 

2 

9 

24 

88 
119 
96 
19 
8 
14 
76 


47 

4 

146 


50 

4 

182 


47 

7 

169 

] 




6. Mortification (Gangrene) 


11 
14 

80 
95 
70 
19 


8 
24 

81 
109 
72 

19 
81 


14 
29 

107 
146 
101 
82 


6 
21 

95 
154 
111 

28 


Q 




7. Rheumatism 


97 


III. 


Group 1. 
1 Cenhalitls 


91 
157 
118 

9Q 




2. Apoplexy and Paralysis, -j •'•• 
8 Insanitv 




4. Chorea 


\ 




5 EnlleDsv 


12 

70 




8 
62 


13 


18 
82 


* * ' '14 

87 


IS 




6 Brain Diseases^ etc 


OS 




7. Nerve Diseases 






Group 2. 
1. Pericarditis 
















T7 




2 Aneurism 


2 
166 


4 
,83 


6 
166 


1 
207 


2 
285 


2 
269 


2 
250 


Q 




8 Heart Diseases^ etc 


ftfIA 









> Includes 8 cases of Chicken Pox. ' Includes Mumps. * Includes Yellow Fever. * Inoludes 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



1896.] CAtJSES OF DEAtfl. 61 

Causes of Deaths Registered in Rhode Island. 



1884. 


1886. 


1886 


1887. 


1888. 


1889. 


1890. 


1891. 


1892. 


1898. 


1894. 


1895. 


1896. 


Total and 
Percental 
for 40 years, 

1863-1892. 




















1 


2 








1 


















18 45 18 

97 91 88 

1 1 


132 
266 


11 
207 


29 
51 


92 

16 

1 

211 

10 


12 
38 

1 

102 

6 


28 
67 

4 
89 

6 


100 
193 

"'157 
6 


9 
123 

2 
138 

5 


54 
107 


58 

53 

1 


954 

5,355 

219 

4,558 
69 


.56 
3.13 

12 


119 
1 


99 228 

r 1 


287 
8 


191 
4 


184 

7 


340 


283 


2.66 
04 




7 

3 

20 

15 


8 
2 
17 
10 




4' i 2 


3 
32 
25 

18 






2 
22 

19 
14 


2 
26 
12 
12 


4 
25 
30 
13 


3 
81 

7 
11 


3 
27 

10 

7 
1 
2 

""is 

6 


44 

8T8 

542 

135 

1 

20 

31 
428 
199 

50 
437 

52 

4,S92 

776 


.02 
.52 
.81 
08 


25^ 86 31 

12 19 10 

13 10 10 


31 

18 
24 


28 
17 

8 










1 




1 
2 


2 

1 
9 

7 


' 


1 










01 


3 i'.:.::: 


1 


1 

18 
6 


1 

40 

8 


1 

11 
12 


""22 
4 


.02 
.25 
.11 
08 


21 16 10 
5 4' 8 


24: 22 

7 9 


17 
4 


16 
3 




29 341 43 


88 69 

2i 2 


38 

2 

135 


41 

1 

107 

168 


29 

2 

149 

177 


34 

2 

133 

336 


6 

4 

129 

85 


80 


29 


42 


.26 
03 


128 105 121 
2' 2 7 


116 


224 

7 


160 
166 


125 

115 

3 

45 

685 

1 

15 

58 

13 

5 

7 

8 

46 

799 

24 

11 
3 


iis 

42 

669 

""i2 
17 
12 

7 

4 

56 

47 

846 

34 

8 
4 


2.87 
.46 


43 
363 

"14 
56 
20 
15 


42 

465 

1 

7 

47 

18 

7 


49 
481 
1 
12 
54 
28 
19 


2\ 
488 

1 
13 
54 
21 

6 


44 

508 
2 
11 
50 
12 
13 


77 

483 

1 

18 
58 
17 
11 


70 
569 

""is 

11 
11 


77 

668 

3 

8 

66 

21 

12 


25 
655 

""14 
62 
1« 
26 


23 

776 
1 
16 
53 
13 
8 


i29 

16 
51 
12 
11 


1,430 

11,222 

18 

269 

2,205 

5.50 

237 


.84 
6.57 
.01 
.15 
1.30 
.82 
.13 




























86 

739 

SO 

7 

1 

2 


43 

783 

22 

22 
3 


41 
827 

12 

20 
3 

9 


29 
710 

16 

28 
2 

1 


32 

800 

16 

19 
5 

i 

" '47 

13 
1{^3 


40 
727 

37 

30 
7 

2 

2 

44 
21 
189 
3 
23 
30 

109 
210 
113 
22 
1 
19 
80 


86 
852 

25 

81 
5 

i 


52 

740 

20 

37 
3 

2 


50 
759 

86 

22 

1 


72 
722 

47 

80 
5 


80 
705 

89 

14 
5 

1 


780 
23,718 

795 

232 
100 

128 
42 

5 

1,905 

270 

8,954 

33 

380 

744 

2,860 
4.176 
2,791 

832 
16 

468 
2.369 


43 

13.87 

.40 

.14 
.06 

.08 








1 

1 
39 
23 
205 






02 


1 


'■'44 

6 

193 


1 
47 
15 
159 


» 

1 
89 
16 
159 






2 

7 
20 
214 








40 


46 
19 
165 
4 
20 
45 

172 

242 

99 

80 

' ' ' 28 
46 


35 

20 

177 

1 

15 
35 

178 
219 
116 
21 
1 
27 
45 


39 
16 
181 






1.12 


7 

156 

5 


29 
284 


si 

226 


.15 

2.81 

.02 


10 


io A 


15 
34 

112 
206 

'^ 

91 


19 
85 

1.S3 
211 
156 
43 
2 
IB 
81 


21 
48 

167 
238 
124 

27 

' "2.5 
79 


17 
40 

187 
276 
181 
39 
4 


13 






22 


34 

78 

mi 

116 
36 


34 

94 
185 
104 

35 



81 

104 
230 
107 
49 
2 


85 

145 
289 
156 
49 

1 


87 

2 

[430 

72 
1 


28 

419 
19 


.48 

1.66 

2.43 

1.63 

.50 

.01 


11 
88 


23 

86 


14 
92 


12' 19 
75 76 
8 1H 


20' 21 

252 259 

13 S 


.27 
1.38 


8 

290 


10 

4 

844 


21 

2 

310 


29 

5 

377 


23 

6 
413 


29 

7 

481 


27 

8 

378 


33 

5 

447 


19 
3 

487 


17 

4 

514 


4 

87 

435 


8 

7 

520 


1' 
6 

538, 


221 
95 

7,747 


.13 

.06 

4.58 



Bilious, Typhus and Continued Fevers. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



62 



^BTV-FOtJRTlt BEdtStaATtON BE? OBt. 

Table X.— Continued. 



[1896. 



1 


i 

CAUSES OP DEATH. 


18B& 

1 


1864. 


1865. 


1866. 


1857. 


1858. 


1869. 


I860. 


m. 


Gboup 8. 
1. Bpistaxis ' 


1 

1 












2. LaryogltlB i 

8. BronobitiB ! 

4. Pleurisy 

6. Croup 


2 

2 

7 

27 

1 
7 


1 
8 
10 
48 
2 
8 

8 
11 
2 
8 


1 
4 
12 
48 
2 
5 

8 
18 
18 


6 
6 
18 
62 
8 
6 

8 
14 
17 


2 
7 
10 
70 
2 
2 

9 
13 
5 


6 
18 
12 
09 

8 

1 
28 
10 


4 
9 
18 
58 
2 
8 

4 

21 
18 


6 
18 
20 
67 




6. Asthma 


8 




7. Lung JHsetues^ etc 


4 




Group 4. 1 
1. Gastritis 1 


11 




8. Enteritis i 

8. Peritonitis ' 

4 Ascites 


11 
4 


28 

14 




6 Uloeration of Intestines 
















6. Hernia 

7. Illeiis (Appendicitis) 


1 


2 
8 


2 

10 






6 

6 


1 
6 

1 


2 




10 


9 


16 




8. Intussusception *... 


1 




9 Stricture of Intestines . i 


1 




2 




1 




10 Fistula ' - 1 


i 








1 1 . Stomach Disecuteft 


5 


5 


4 


11 


7 


8 


9 




12 Pancreas Diaeages 






18 Heoatitis 1 










6 

8 

20 


9 




14. Jaundice 

15. Liver Diseases., etc 


8 
4 


2 
6 
2 
4 
21. "i 
118 


2 

6 


7 


8 

18 


4 

81 


7 
81 




Ifi SnUen Diseases tic 






17. Dowel Diseases, etc 


4 
20 
88 

1 


3 

58 
71 


" " * '40 
51 


2 

55 
65 


4 

44 
61 


6 
65 
58 

8 


12 




18. Diarrhoea (Cholera Morbus) 

19. Dysentery 


48 
49 




Group 6. 

1. Nephritis (Bright'B Disease, etc.).. 

2. Ischuria 


1 






2 
8 


8 


2 
3 




1 




8. Diabetes 

4. Calculus (Gravel, etc.) 


1 


i 

1 
1 
1 


8 
8 


8 
1 
4 

*"*i2 


8 
1 




6. Cystitis 

6. Prostate Disease 


1 


1 


2 




2 




5 
13 
3 


2 

8 
2 


1 




7. Kidney Diseases, etc 


1 
2 


5 
2 


5 


15 




8 Bladder Diseases etc 






Group 6. 

1. Dis. of Male Organs of Generation. 

2. Ovarian Diseases 








.......... 


2 

1 


8 
2 


2 


4 
8 








8 Uterine Diseases, etc 


6 


4 




1 




Group 7. 
1. Arthritis 






2 Joint Diseases, etc 


3 

2 


1 



2 

1 


2 

7 
2 


7 

4 
1 
2 


6 

3 
2 
4 


6 
2 


9 

1 


5 




Group 8. 
1 Phlemnon 


7 




2. Ulcer 


8 




8 Skin Diseases.^ etc 




1 


1 


1 




Group 9. 
1 . Bve and Ear 






IV. 


Group 1. 
1 Stniborn 


41 
89 
29 


78 

6H 

68 

1 

18 

1....^ 


124 
91 

84 

28 


188 

. 77 

64 

1 

17 
15 


185 
70 
67 


177 
98 
57 


177 
61 
50 


167 




2 Cholera Infantum 


151 
70 




R Convulsions 




4 Cyanosis 




5.* Debility (Infantile),Prem. Blrth,etc 
6 Teething • • • 


2 

8 


17 
85 


88 
29 


25 
81 


42 

81 




7* Hemorrhage, Umbilical 






ft Icterus Neonatorum 


1 
















9 Indigestion 


1 
















10 Innutrition 


1 
















1 1 Rnina Bifida 


2 

1 










2 
18 








12 Othpr Malformations 


7 


11 


5 


12 


14 


15 







Digitized by VjOOQIC 



1896.] CAUSES OF DEATH. 63 

Causes of Deaths Registered in Rhode Island, 



1881. 


1862. 


1863. 


1864. 


1865. 


1866. 


1867. 


1868. 


1869. 1870. 


1871. 


1872. 


1873. 


1874. 


1875. 






























2 

18 
21 
58 
8 
12 

" "24 

7 


1 

7 

17 

76 

8 

4 
30 
14 


1 

17 

14 

97 

8 

3 

8 
27 
5 


1 
7 
16 
105 
7 
4 

11 
27 
19 


1 

10 

16 

94 

3 

3 

6 

20 
13 


1 

17 
20 
63 
4 
4 

2 
30 
13 


1 

19 
16 
50 
4 
2 

9 
34 
11 


2 

22 
13 
30 
5 
2 

7 

19 

9 


4 

20 

19 

41 

3 

3 

9 
25 


2 
28 
12 
53 
8 
3 

10 
29 

8 


2 
24 
18 
72 
4 
3 

" ■ *36 
11 


2 

26 
12 
66 
4 
40 

16 
15 
24 


34 

10 
24 

17 


3 
40 
10 
65 
10 
36 

8 
87 
20 


4 

58 
10 
96 
10 
13 

28 
29 
28 


















1 










5 
9 


4 

7 


7 
5 


2 
5 

1 


5 

7 

1 


1 
9 
1 


6 
11 
2 


6 
6 
1 


4 6 
8 5 
1 1 


7 
18 


2 
3 
1 


4 
6 
2 
1 


\ 


1 






1 




1 
























17 


8 


12 


4 


2 


4 


8 


7 


2, 8 


14 


13 


■ 15] ' 88 


18 




6 
5 
32 


2 

84 

I 

.61 
262 


4 
8 
37 

i 

102 
110 


4 
3 

20 
1 
4 

90 
188 


7 

6 

37 

i 

74 
148 

8 


5 

3 

30 

1 

* "47 
118 

17 


4 
4 
23 

2 

55 
52 

16 


6 6 


* * "a5 


2 

2 

31 


1 




4 
81 


8 

28 
2 
3 
61 
74 

18 


2 
37 


2 4 

43 86 

2 1 


4 

48 

1 


4 
64 
96 


2 
66 
£2 


4 
46 
55 


1 
60 
43 

24 


27 
118 
83 

87 


29 
77 
36 

39 


26 
73 
38 

A9. 


11 
78 
86 

40 










1 
6 
2 








8 


2 

1 
4 


4 
4 
4 


6 
2 


6 
2 


1 
3 


11 
3 


61 8 

3I 1 


5 
4 


7 
5 


8 5 
2 4 

1 


11 
2 


i 






2 
13 
2 






3 
8 
5 


1 2 
14| 16 
4 6 


2 
19 
3 


2 

18 
8 


4 


3 

25 

4 


15 
3 


17 
1 


22 
1 


16 
4 


8 
5 


15 

7 


27 
5 


24 

10 


2 






















1 




7 


1 


3 


1 


4 


i 


1 


2 





1 




5 


8 


8 


1 


15 

11 
6 


8 

4 
3 
2 


9 

7 
2 


7 

9 
1 
2 


5 

8 


1 


5 

8 
2 
3 


6 

15 
8 
4 


12 

10 
2 
2 


11 

4 
4 


15 

9 
2 


5 

11 
2 
3 


11 

10 

1 
1 


18 

10 
5 
2 


15 

18 
3 
3 


16 

9 
8 
4 










146 
126 
70 


123 
106 
55 
2 
»> 
89 


111 
114 
71 


188 
183 
73 


177 
145 
73 


172 
110 


163 

•117 

68 


212 

154 
63 


220 

151 
79 


234 
223 

85 


223 
172 
83 


202 
391 
116 


228 
285 
97 


277 
265 
98 


246 
318 
100 


45 

40 


47 
34 


46 
28 


62 
31 


54 
28 


60 
30 


47 
23 


84 

24 


67 
34 


53 
20 


100 
31 


169 
50 


154 
42 


185 
20 




























































































8 






























10 


11 


13 


8 


10 


12 


17 


16 


15 


14 


15 


17 


15 


17 


15 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



64 



FORTY-FOURTH REGISTRATION REPORT. [1896. 

Table X. — Continued. 



i 


CAUSES OP DEATH. 


1 

1 

1876. . 


1877. 


1878. 


1879. 


1880. 


1881. 


1882. 


1888. 


1 

III. 


Group 8. 
1. Epistaxis 














2. Laryngitis 


2- 
57 
9 
102, 
7 
14i 

i 

IS 
30 
24 


2 
78 

5 
95 

8 
8 

22 

89 
17 


2 

80 
8 

8 
15 

14 
40 
22 


2' 
67 
18! 
WJl 
13, 
121 

17 
24 


8 
94 
17 
66 
11 
14 

18 

as 

24 


6 
86 

9 

101 

16 

20 

27 
44 
27 


7 
101 
8 
77 
9 
12 

80 
75 
80 


5 


8. Bronchitis 


111 


4. Pleurisy 


18 


5. Croup 


71 


(J. Asthma 


14 


7 Tmnn liiMfifiJtfijt p.tr. 


34 


Group 4. 

1 1 Gastritis 

1 2. Enteritis 

1 8. Peritonitis 

4 ARnltRR 


85 

47 

40 

1 


] 
1 


5. Ulceration of Intestines 


















4 


6. Hernia 

7. llleus (Appendicitis) 


7 
8 


5 

8' 


12 
8 


12 
9 
2 


8 
9 


10 
10 
5 


11 
8 
5 


7 
11 


8. IntUHSusceplion 

9 Stricture of Intestines 


3 

1 


10. Fistula 


















11 Stwnuch DincdHeA 


10 


7 


13 


13 


10 


12 


14 


16 


12 PancTcati DiaeascK 




13. Hepatitis 

14. Jaundice 

15. Liver Dis&aneft, etc 

16. Spleen Dineanes, etc 

17. Bmvel Ditieaseifs etc 

18. Diarrhoea (Cholera Morbus) 

19. Dysentery 

Group 5. 

1. Nephritis (Brlght's Disease, etc.). . 

2. Ischuria 


5 

1. 

39 

k 

50 
38 


6 

89 
2 

1 
130 
52 

1 
46 


5 
4 
40 
1 
4 

59 
40 

54 


5 
4? 


6 

3 

49 


8 

3 

35 


8 
8 
50 


7 
6 
88 




2 
61 
44 

61 


9 
8! 
28 

66 


6 

95 
42 

54 


6 
124 

68 

44 


20 
1.55 
54 

93 
2 




3. Diabetes 

4. Calculus (Gravel, etc) 


6 
1 


9 
9 


4 

1 


15 

1 


15 


16 

1 


13 


15 
1 


5. Cystitis 


8 


6. Prostate Disease 


4 

12 
9 


2 
21 
11 


4 
27 

2 


4 

20 
12 


9 


1 
25 
13 


8 

44 
14 


7 




7. Kidrtey Diseases^ etc 


36 




8. Bladder Dimeases^ etc 


11 




Group 6. 

1. Dis. of Male Organs of Generation. 

2. Ovarian Diseases 


















6 




3. Uterine Diseases^ etc 


2 


4; i 

i 




7 


8 


6 


20 




Group 7. 
1. Arthritis 






2. Joint Diseases, etc 


18 
8 
2 


15 

7 

i 


10 

18 
2 
5 


20 
14 


15 
5 


11 

17 
8 
8 


25 

14 
2 

1 


26 




Group 8. 
1. Phlegmon 


18 




2 Ulcer '. 


1 




3. Skin Diseases, etc 


3 


2 






Group 9. 
1. Eye and Ear 




IV. 


Group 1. 
1. Stillborn 


224 

250 
89 


242 

2:39 
83 


248 

16^ 
112 


216 
161 
104 


192 

247 

133 

3 

98 

25 


264 
240 
102 


253 
325 

110 


253 




2. Cholera Infantum 


242 




3 Convulsions 


126 




4. Cyanosis 


17 




5. Debility (Infantile),Prem.Birth,etc 

6. Teething 

7 Hemorrhage, Umbilical 


75 
22 


67 
27 


72 
Ifc 


69 
22 


92 

28 


101 
33 


137 
30 




8 Icterus Neonatorum 


1 


















9 Indierestion 


. 
















10. Innutrition 


1 1 
















11. Spina Bifida 


1 


















12. Other Malformations. . . 




26 


32 


19 


IS 


26 


21 


19 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



CAUSES OP DEATH. 



laST. I 1888. 




^cttxses of Deaths Registered in Rhode Island. 



«7 



192 



15 



19j 



1889. 



m>\ 



15 



15 



18 



176 



1890. 



1891. 







1 


295 


829 


296 


467 


427 


582 


154 


186 


156 


16 


11 


14 


280 


195 


225 


85 


44 


27 


""4 


4 


6 


16 


15 


19 



247 



82 



1892. 



1898. 



848 



47 



1894. 





8 


16 


35 


16 


17 


11 


4 


8 




1 


1 


17 


19 




1 



266 



1896. 



194 



1896. 



28 



5 20 10 



197 



16 



16 



869 



Total and 
Percentage 
for 40 years, 

1858-1888. 



8,516 
2,898 



2 

412 


10 
892 


11 
867 


5 

1 
424 


1 

8,548 


608 


496 


500 


545 


9,828 


151 


147 


120 


IO2I 


8,796 


21 


27 


27 


20, 


140 


224 


871 


as9 


888! 


8,761 


27 


34 


28 




1,145 


5 


5 


18 

5 

28 

81 


8' 
7 

40 
87 




5 


8 


5 


11 


80 


19 


15 


27 


21, 


604 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



66 



FORTY-FOURTH REGISTRATION REPORT. 

Table X. — Continned. 



[1896. 



1 


CAUSES OF DEATH. 


1R58. 


1854. 


18S6. 


1856. 


1867. 


1868. 


1859. 


1860. 


IV. 


Group 2. 
1 . Param?xil& 




















2. Childbirth 


10 
58 
18 

1 
9 
18 


7 
67 
28 

1 
9 
15 


9 
84 
47 

""u 

18 


14 
76 
68 

4 
12 
18 


13 
119 
68 


24 

114 
55 


14 
117 
48 


18 




Group 8. 
1 Old Age 


116 




Group 4. 
1 Atroohv and Debilltv 


62 


V. 


Group 1. 
(Accidents or Nboliobnoi.) 

1. Fractures and Contusions* 

2 Bums and Soalds 






7 
20 


6 
24 


18 
24 


24 




8 Drowninir 


82 




4. Falls 






6 Poison 


1 

2 

81 


8 
2 
28 


6 

""ii 


4 

7 
16 


8 
8 
40 


5 
■*'*88 


4 

1 

87 


7 




6. Suffocation and Strangulation.... 
7 Otherwise 


1 
65 




Group 2. 
1. Battle 






Group 8. 
1 Homicide 


8 

8 

15 

100 


8 

20 
131 


9 

8 

19 

169 


1 

4 

14 

292 


1 

8 

80 

258 


1 

18 

14 

296 


1 

9 

22 

241 


4 




Group 4. 
1. Suicide 


12 










Causes ill-defined 


87 




Causes not stated 


188 









* Includes railroad accidents. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



1896.] CAUSES OP BEATfl* 67 

Causes of Deaths Registered in Rhode Island. 



1861. 


1862. 


1868. 


1864. 


1866. 


1866. 


1867. 


1868. 


1869 


1870; 


1871. 


1872* 


1873. 


1874. 


18?5. 




1 
22 


'"21 


2 

21 
























19 


18 


24 


26 


22 


27 


28 


84 


36 


29 


44 


85 


132 


143 


161 


193 


152 


178 


188 


206 


217 


204 


232 


223 


254 


223 


216 


62 


47 


40 


42 


47 


42 


41 


41 


52 


56 


58 


69 


84 


79 


90 






' 






12 
18 
27 

'I 


8 
16 
28 
14 

2 


8 
16 
20 
18 


6 
15 
24 
21 

4 


9 
12 
80 
19 

4 


12 
12 
24 
25 
2 


15 
12 
29 
18 
1 


16 
14 
86 
15 
5 
4 
55 


16 
28 
89 
12 
5 
6 
27 


12 


21 
29 


14 
29 


10 

21 


12 
26 


16 
20 


17 
35 

20 


9 
3 


2 

3 

48 


1 

1 

71 


8 

1 

64 


2 

1 
51 


6 
5 


81 


89 


89 


85 


85 


38 


81 


51 


47 




7 
1 


3 

5 


2 

2 


1 


1 
1 




















3 


5 




2 


5 




2 


3 


4 


3 


1.2 


8 


18 


6 


12 


11 


15 


18 


15 


27 


19 


18 


8 


18 


26 


18 


21 


20 


34 


40 


88 


30 


48 


51 


59 


43 


87 


70 


'57 


56 


202 


188 


217 


209 


207 


171 


195 


268 


800 


187 


249 


876 


217 


152 


20T 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



«8 



FORTY-FOUBTfl BBGlSTRATtON BEPOBT. 

Tablb X.-~Continaed. 



[1896. 



IV. 



CAUSES OF DEATH. 



1. Paramenia.. 
8. ChUdblrth... 



Gboup 8. 



1. Old Age. 



Group 8. 



Group 4. 
1. Atrophy and Debility. 



Group 1. 

(ACCIDSMTS OR NKOLIOIMCB.) 

1. Fractures and Contusions* 

2. Bums and Scalds 

8. Drowning: , 

4 Fall". 

r> P(»ij*..n 

r. SutT«'c ri-Pi m'h' st iuuiilall-'n... 
V. Ot'uTw Lae 



1. Uot U 



1876. 



. Homicule. 


Guoup 8. 


1. Suicide.. 


Group 4. 


Oaoses ill*deflned 


Causes not stated 



80 



841 



78 



1877. 1878. 



89 86 



818 8» 



89, 64 



1879. ; 1880. I 1881. 

I I 



1888. 



86 86, 88 



10 IS 

12 18 llj 

or* OA AA^ 



79 



10 
18 



878 



107 



18 



847 i 

88 106 
I 

i 



1888. 



2 
42 



275 



180 



20 16 16 
81 16 17 18 



87 80 44' 22 38 29 40 27 

12 14 U 16 14 19 81 24 

4 9 6 7 6 9 7 10 

9 6 19 8 12 

47 48 U 45 66 48 59 58 



4 


8 


8 


1 


1 


J 


18 


82 


21 


18 


10 


88 


82 


56 


49 


48 


46 


55 


218 


198 


210 


854 


888 


847 



81 



26 



45| 22 



271 



186 



> Includes railroad accidents. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



1896.] CAUSES OF DEATH. 69 

Causes of Deaths Registered in Rhode Island. 





























Total and 


1884. 


1885. 


1886, 


1887. 


1888. 


1889. 


1890. 


1891. 


1892. 


1898. 


1894. 


1895. 


1896. 


Percentage 

for 40 years, 

1858-1892. 




























4 


a 

26 


'"si 


1 

28 








1 
22 


3 

46 








4 
40 


16 
1.041 


.01 


85 


88 


27 


26 


60 


62 


40 


.61 


298 


267 


276 


278 


290 


227 


198 


186 


256 


188 


187 


197 


206 


7,937 


4.64 


126 


122 


186 


146 


169 


281 


240 


817 


241 


181 


78 


85 


87 


8,557 


2.08 


16 

ao 

41 
81 
8 
11 
70 


16 
19 
42 
26 
9 
10 
68 


20 
28 
68 
19 
6 
10 
68 


47 
17 
89 
17 
7 
14 
66 


88 
27 

46 
18 
13 
8 
46 


48 
20 
62 
81 
7 
9 
49 


67 
20 
71 
92 
11 
12 
47 


69 
18 
62 
21 
16 
17 
50 


89 
21 
48 
83 
23 
S6 
69 


26 
26 
47 
25 
14 
14 
178 


19 
28 
62 
28 
6 
31 
80 


86 
28 
61 
67 
8 
22 
81 


" *25 
39 
48 
8 
24 
152 


614 
683 

1,282 
646 
241 
210 

1,887 

14 
105 


.86 
.87 
.76 

.01 


2 


^ . 


2 


2 


5 


8 


2 


1 


4 


8 


9 


6 


2 


.06 


22 


20 


17 


16 


21 


24 


19 


40 


19 


21 


46 


81 


88 


647 


• -^ 


19 


57 


89 


85 


46 


49 


46 


85 


84 


81 


2 


81 


46 


1,550 


.90 


42 


- 


61 


19 


28 


" 


48 


84 


28 


68 


65 


62 


29 


7,239 


4.24 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



70 FORTY-FOURTH REGISTRATION REPORT. [1896. 

Table XI. ~ OCCUPATIONS AND AGES OF DECEDENTS. 

Showing the number and occupation of decedents for the year 1896, 

and for a period of forty-fonr years and seven months, 1852 

to 1896 inclusive. Ages under Twenty excluded. 



OCCUPATIONS. 



I. 
Tillers of the Soil. 

Farmers 

Florists 

GardeDers 

Total 

II. 

Professional and Per- 
sonal. 

Actors 

Architects 

Artists 

Assayers and Analytical 

Chemists 

Athletes 

Authors 

Ball Players 

Chiropodists 

Civil Engineers. 

Clergymen 

Dancing Masters 

Dentists 

Designers. 

Draughtsmen 

Electricians 

Inspectors 

Inventors 

Journalists (Editors and 

Reporters) 

Judges and Justices. . . 
Lawyers 



State of Rhode Island. 



1896. 



I 
I 



169 

6 

13 



187 



3 
11 
1 
1 
3 
3 
2 
2 



12,228 72.35 
288 57.60, 
795 61.15 



13,311 



127 
63 



71.18 



63.50 
63.00 



156 52.00 
757 68.82 

65'65 

3131 



14347 

79J26 

104;52 



148 74.00 



165 



41.25 



226 56.50 



44 Years and 7 Months, 


Jane 1, 


1868, to Dec. 81, 1S96. 


>% 


i 


1 


t t 


1 


1 
1 


1 


H 


< ' < 


6,523 


1 

1 

436,845 66.97 


53 


2,906 54.83 


270 


15,87758.80 


6,846 


455,62866.55 


12 


1 
41334.42 


13 


775;59.61 


37 


1,882 50.86 


5 


3,020 60.40 


1 


2525.00 


7 


47768.14 


2 


65 32.50 


1 


58158.00 


48 


2,405 50.10 


235 


15,021,63.92 


2 


103 51.50 


38 


2,004 52.74 


20 


1,002150.10 


12 


380 31.67 


8 


26131.38 


10 


503 50.30 


14 


906 64.71 


37 


1,675 45.27 


15 


981,65.40 


163 


9,llg 


;'55.94 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



1896.] OCCUPATIONS AND AGES AT DEATH. 71 

Table XI. -OCCUPATIONS AND AGES. -Continued. 







State of 


Bhode Island. 




OCCUPATIONS. 


1 

i 

1 
3 


1896. 




44 Ye 
June 1, 3 

1 
1 


ars and 7 Moni 
852, to Dec. 81 

< 


,1896. 

! 

< 


Lecturers 


62 
135 


62.00 
45.00 


2 

68 
14 

24 

306 

. 138 

83 

3 

122 
2 
3 

78 

24 
7 
6 


108 

3,181 

743 

1,098 

18,339 

6,728 

5,017 

152 

6,757 

80 

131 

1,771 

731 
310 
398 


54.00 


MusiciaDS 


46 78 


Nurses 


53.07 


Photographers and Litho- 
sraohers 








45 75 


Physicians 


10 
2 
1 


527 

140 

57 


52.70 
70.00 
57.00 


59 93 


Professors and Teachers. 
Public Officers 


48.75 
60 45 


Publishers 


50 67 


Sheriffs, Constables and 
Policemen 


10 


549 


54.90 


55.39 


Sculotors. 


40 00 


Stenographers 


1 
2 

3 
2 
1 

73 

4 
6 
3 


51 

47 

102 
88 
53 


51.00 
23.50 

34.00 
44.00 
53.00 


43 67 


Students 


22 83 


Telephone and Telegraph 
Operators 


30 46 


Veterinary Surgeons 

Weighers and Gangers . . 


44.29 
66.33 


Total 


3,875 

209 
332 
165 


53.08 

52.25 
55.33 
55.00 


1,560 

212 

13 

8 

6 

137 

63 

40 

2 

3 

8 

275 

2 

11 

2 

19 


86,618 

10,997 

755 

490 

274 

8,082 

. 4,047 

1,506 

118 

213 

273 

14,084 

113 

609 

68 

1,153 


55 52 


III. 

Optional Activity. 

Agents and Canvassers. . 

Insurance. 

Real Estate 


51.87 
58.08 
61 25 


Auctioneers 


45 67 


Bankers and Brokers 

Bank Officers 


5 


246 


49.20 


58.99 
64 24 


Bar Tenders 


8 


309 


38.63 


37 65 


Bill Posters 


59 00 


Booksellers 








71 00 


Bottlers 

Butchers and Marketmen. 
Carriage Dealers 

Coal and Wood 

Dry Goods 


1 
12 

1 
2 


27 

607 

58 

116 


27.00 
50.58 
58.00 
58.00 


34.13 
51.21 
56.50 
55.36 
34 00 


Fish and Oyster 


1 


66 


66.00 


60.68 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



72 FOKnr-FOUBTH BSGI8TBATIOM BBPOBT. [1896. 

Tabu: XL— 0CX3UPATI0NS AND AGEB-— Contimied. 



OCCUPATIONS. 



Furniture Dealers 

Grain 

Hardware 

Ice 

Junk 

Leather 

Liquor 

Lumber 

News 

Paper 

Provision 

Rubber 

Shoe 

Stove 

Wool Waste 

Clothiers 

Collectors. 

Commercial Travelers. . . 
Contractors and Builders. 
Druggists and Apothe- 
caries 

Fruiterers. 

Grocers 

Hotel and Innkeepers. .. 

Saloon and Restaurant. 

Stable 

Store , 

Ice-cream Makers 

Mail Carriers 

Manufacturers 

Merchants 

Opticians 

Organ and Piano Tuners. 

Policy Brokers 

Pork and Meat Cutters 

and Packers 

Railroad OflScials 

Ship Chandlers 

Stock Brokers 

Tobacconists 



State of Rhode Island. 



18M. 



I 



1 

4 

12 



17 
39 



45 
29 



204 
147 



96 



49 
139 
692 

286 



531 
211 
397 
93 
476 



1.148 
1,704 



223 
181 



68 



45.00 
29.00 



51.00 
78.50 



48.00 



49.00 
34.75 
57.66 

57.20 



59.00 
52.75 
49.62 
46.50 
52.89 



67.53 
46.25 



55.75 
45.25 



68.00 



44 Yean and 7 Months, 
Jane 1, 180S, to Deo. 81, 1896. 



2 

4 

3 

3 

13 

2 

113 

12 

1 

1 

17 

1 

9 

2 

1 

12 

20 

11 

99 

99 

5 

422 

162 

187 

77 

20 

3 

12 

594 

1,224 

6 

6 

1 

15 

91 

5 

1 

18 



1S2 
2S9 

161 
132 
714 

81 

5,122 

665 

73 

64 
940 

48 
492 
152 

56 

695 

1,185 

496 

5,770 

7,528 

206 

22,790 

8,798 

8,609 

6,966 

1,061 

151 

530 

36,053 

71,760 

338 

402 

24 

684 

4,164 

318 

68 

767 



86.00 
59.75 
53.67 
44.00 
54.92 
40.50 
45.33 
55.42 
73.00 
64.00 
55.29 
48.00 
54.66 
76.00 
56.00 
57.92 
59.25 
45.09 
58.28 

76.04 
41.20 
54.00 
54.31 
46.04 
88.18 
53.05 
50.33 
44.17 
60.69 
58.63 
56.33 
67.00 
24.00 

45.60 
45.76 
68.60 
68.00 
59,00 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



1896.] OCCUPATIONS AND AGES AT DEATH. 73 

Table XI.— OCCUPATIONS AND AGES.— Continued. 



OCCUPATIONS. 



Traders .... 
Undertakers. 



Total. 



IV. 
Outdoor — Local. 



Boat Builders 

Brickmakers 

Brick and Stone Layers. . 

Calkers 

Carpenters and Joiners.. 

Masons 

Millwrights 

Pavers 

Riggers 

Roofers 

Ship Carpenters 

Slaters 

Stonecutters and Marble 
Workers 

Superintendents of High- 
ways 

Tanners and Curriers 

Wheelwrights 



Total. 



Indoor.— -^c^ive. 

Axe and Scythe Grinders, 

Bakers 

Basket Makers 

Belt. 

Bobbin. 

Boiler 

Bolt 



State of Rhode Island. 



3 

o 



175 



71 
31 



19 



1896. 

bo 
< 

S 
I 
I 



68 
136 



9,048 



209 
23 



4,411 
1,959 



21 



48 
134 



968 



62 
71 



131 7,906 



^ 



58.00 
68.00 



51.70 



69.67 
23.00 



62.13 
63.19 



21.00 



48.00 
67.00 



50.95 



62.00 
71.00 



67.22 



8 282 

I 



:i' 



23 



54 
41 



35.25 



23.00 



54.00 
41.00 



44 Years and 7 Months, 
June 1, 1855J, to Deo. 31, 1896. 



o 

3 

o 



26 

8 

^ 13 

12 

1,993 

830 

35 

3 

22 

6 

77 

9 

263 

1 

48 

103 



4' 
139 

7| 
101 

li 
70 

li 



S 



< 



282, 14,188 
44 2,557 



50.31 
58.11 



4,396 247,961 



56.41 



1.558 

352 

611 

873 

110,392 

47,839 

2,347 
129 

1,254 
332 

5,336 
398 

13,239 

79 
2,975 
6,237 



3,449 193,951 



59.92 
44.00 
47.00 
72.75 
55.39 
57.63 
67.06 
43.00 
57.00 
55.33 
69.29 
44.22 

50.34 

79.00 
61.98 
60.55 



222 

9,535 

404 

567 

62 

2,886 

41 



56.23 



55.50 
68.60 
57.71 
56.70 
62.00 
41.23 
41.00 



10 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



74 PORTY-POUBTH REGISTRATION REPORT. [1896. 

Table XI.— OCCUPATIONS AND AGES.— Continued. 



OCCUPATIONS. 



Statk of Rhods Island. 



1806. 



o 



& 



Broom and Brush Makers. ; 

Cabinet I 

Card I 

Carriage, and Trimmers' 

Chair 

Comb I 



Mattress. 

Pattern 

Pianoforte 

Picker 

Plane 

Pump and Block 

Reed 

Sash and Blind 

Scythe 

Spindle 

Stopper 

Stove, and Mounters . . 

Tool 

Trunk 

Umbrella 

Wringer 

Beamers 

Bell Hangers 

Blacksmiths and Farriers. 
Bleachers and Fullers. . . 

Bonnet Dressers 

Brewers 

Britannia Workers 

Calico Printers 

Car Builders 

Stair 

Carders 

Carvers 

Colorers 

Confectioners 

Cooks and Caterers 

Coopers 

Coppersmiths 

Cutters 



21 



110|55.00 
11959.56 



44 Years and 7 Months. 
June 1, 1868, to Dec. 81, 1896. 



I 



304 60.80; 



45 45.00 
254 50.80 



32 



32.00 



1,190 
"77 



3 

11 

2 



154 
541 
122 



56 



56.67 

77! 66 



51.33 
49.18 
61.00 



56.00 



15 

127 

4 

71 

1 
5 
1 

74 
3 
5 
1 

14 
6 
9 
1 
5 
1 
4 

26 
3 



1 

1 

2 

643 

62 
2 

19 
1 

57 
1 
4 
5 
3 
1 

41 

88 
126 

12 
6 



743 

7,332 

201 

3,855 

70 
187 

38 

4,326 

157 

303 

79 
788 
352 
440 

83 
297 

22 

185 

1,377 

89 



32 

37 

47 

34,693 

3,113 

73 

948 

65 

3,106 

57 

219 

297 

147 

27 

1,874 

4,161 

8,313 

736 

267 






49.53 
57.73 
50.25 
54.29 
70.00 
37.40 
38.00 
58.46 
52.33 
60.06 
79.00 
55.71 
58.67 
48.89 
83.00 
59.40 
22.00 
46.25 
52.96 
29.67 



32.00 
37.00 
23.50 
53.95 
50.21 
36.50 
49.89 
65.00 
54.49 
57.00 
54.75 
59.40 
49.00 
27.00 
45.71 
47.28 
65.98 
61.33 
44.50 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



1896.] OCCUPATIONS AND AGES AT DEATH. 75 

Table XL— OCCUPATIONS AND AGES.— Continued. 





Statb op 


Rhode Island. 




.1896. 


44 Tears and 7 Months, 
June 1, 1852, to Deo. 81, 1896. 


OCCUPATIONS. 


1 

i 


< 

i 


! 

< 


. 1 
1 

i 


i 
< 

1 


< 


Cutters, Nail 








12 

11 

1 

125 

10 

8 

11 

4 

56 

11 

24 

25 

3 

11 

1 

6 

1,500 

474 

5 

15 

315 

847 

22 

51 
2 
1 
3 

97 
6 
3 
3 
1 
7 
2 
5 
7 
7 

295 


490 

422 

77 

6,330 

381 

472 

630 

195 

2,401 

449 

1,314 

1,364 

111 

508 

47 

240 

72,572 

25,199 

291 

836 

14,537 

40,552 

1,169 

2,420 

134 

60 

124 

3,864 

261 

84 

153 

76 

311 

115 

353 

292 

416 

16,325 


40.83 


Decorators 








38 35 


Distillers 








77.00 


Dyers 


5 


198 


39.60 


50.64 


Founders 


38.10 


Brass and Iron 








59.00 


Foundrymen 


3 


141 


47.00 


57.27 


Furnaeemen 


48.75 


Gasfitters. 


1 
2 


44 
98 


44.00 
49.00 


42 87 


Gilders 


40.82 


Gun and Locksmiths 


54.75 


Hatters 


2 


139 


69.50 


54 56 


Heaters 


37.00 


Iron Rollers and Workers. 








46.18 


Japanners 








47.00 


Lathers 


2 

78 
8 


106 

3,665 

447 


53.00 
46.99 
55.88 


40.00 


Machinists 


48.38 


Mechanics 


53.16 


Melters 


58.20 


Miners 


1 
24 
40 

1 

4 


65 
1,090 
2,106 

41 

201 


65.00 
45.42 
52.65 
41.00 

50.25 


55.80 


Moulders 


46.15 


Painters and Glaziers 

Paperhangers 


47.88 
53.14 


Plasterers and Stucco 
Workers. 


47.45 


Platers 


67.00 


Electro 








60.00 


Gold 








41.33 


Plumbers 


5 
2 


219 
79 


43.80 
39.50 


39.83 


Pressmen , 


43.50 


Refiners 


28.00 


Gold. 








51.00 


Oil 








76.00 


Sugar 








44.43 


Scissors Grinders ....... 








57.50 


Soap Boilers 








70.60 


Steam Pipers 








41.71 


Stove Manufacturers. . . . 








59.43 


Superintendents & Over- 
seers 


22 


1,296 


58.91 


55.34 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



76 FORTY-FOURTH REGISTRATION REPORT. [1896. 

Table XI.— OCCUPATIONS AND AGES.— Continued. 



OCCUPATIONS. 



State of Rhode Island. 



I 
3 

o 



1896^ 

< 

s 



^ 



Tallow Chandlers. 

Tinsmiths 

Upholsterers 

Wire Workers 

Wood Carvers . . . . 

Finishers 

Turners 



339 
60 
33 



121 



Total. 



VI. 
Indoor. — Activity Re- 
stricted, 

Barbers 

Bookbinders 

Bookkeepers & Account- 
ants.. 

Box Makers 

Braid 

Chain 

Cigar 

Clock and Watch 

Harness, and Saddlers. 

Paper 

Rope 

Sail 

Shoe 

Chasers 

Clerks and Salesmen 

Die Sinkers 

Enamelers 

Engravers 

File Cutters 

Forgers 

Finishers 

Brass 

Jewelers 

Shell. 

Lapidaries 



275 



10 

1 

12 



2 
19 

2 
57 



1 

2 

45 



13,882 



428 
59 

542 



258 

64 

233 



97 
1,147 

51 
2,395 



109 
136 
244 



47 

113 

1,985 



5 



67.80 
50.00 
33.00 



60.50 



50.48 



42.80 
59.00 

45.17 



64.50 
64.00 
46.60 



48.50 
60.37 
25.50 
42.02 



54.50 
45.33 
40.67 



47.00 
56.50 
44,11 



44 Years and 7 Months, 
June 1, 1852, to Deo. 81, 1896. 



^ 


S 




5 


^ 


t 


s 


^ 


1^ 
3 




1 


o 


A 


► 


H 


< 


< 









4 

119 

111 
4, 

J! 



5,909 



232 

26 

387 

17 

1 

5 

104 

34 

120 

7 

25 

37 

587 

13 

1,139 

21 

7 

132 

85 

1 

11 

5 

996 

3 

11 



322 80.50 

5,47446.00 

2,059|40.37 

51346.64 

I49I37.25 

383'54.7I 

1,651,39.31 



299,024 50.60 



7,837 
1,203 

17,191 

741 

66 

261 

4,704 

1,903 

5,914 

389 

1,672 

2,143 

33,908 

493 

42,794 

1,016 

414 

6,312 

3,462 

40 

542 

230 

41,198 

182 

362 



33.78 
46.27 

44.42 
43.69 
66 . 00 
52.60 
45 . 23 
|55.97 
49.28 
55.57 
66.88 
57.92 
57.76 
37.92 
37.57 
48.38 
59.14 
47.82 
40.73 
40.00 
49.27 
46.00 
41.36 
60.67 
32.91 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



1896.] OCCUPATIONS AND AGES AT DEATH. 77 

Table XI.— OCCUPATIONS AND AGES.— Continued. 





State of 


Rhode Islai«d. 


ths, 
1, 1896. 




• 1896. 


44 Years and 7 Mon 
June 1, 1852, to Dec. 3 


OCCUPATIONS. 


1 


i 

< 


i 


1 


i 

1 


< 
1 


Laundrjmen 


4 


175 


43.75 


16 

3 

45 

2,343 

2 

25 

1 

1 

189 

32 

151 

113 

409 

53 


671 
224 


41 31 


Leather Dressers 


74 67 


Millers 

Operatives 


1 
109 


81 
4,849 


81.00 
44.49 


2,664 59.20 
102,478 43 74 


Pearl Cutters 


85 

1,174 

23 

42 

1 1 ,003 

1,852 

6,346 

5,071 

22,483 

2,492 


42.50 


Polishers 








46.96 


Silver 








23.00 


Steel 









42.00 


Printers 


5 
1 
6 
5 
19 
5 


237 

22 

338 

268 

1,186 

170 


47.40 
22.00 
56.33 
53.60 
62.42 
34.00 


58 22 


Roll Coverers 


57 87 


Rubber Workers. 

Silversmiths. 


42.03 
44 87 


Tailors 


54 96 


Wool Sorters 


47 02 






Total 


327 


15, 2344.fi .^9 


7,389 

6 

4 

27 

1 

106 

2 

46 

32 

179 

34 

2 

389 

96 

6 

235 

1 

123 

6 

1 5 


331,585 

3,220 

124 

1,538 

35 
3,068 

57 
1,985 

1,192 

7,740 

1,294 

83 

18,659 

4,815 

217 

11,985 

61 

5,306 

423 

324 


44 88 


VIL 

Occupations at Large. 

Army Officers 






53.67 


Baggage Masters 

Boatmen 


1 


36 


36.00 


31.00 
56 96 


Bootblacks 








35.00 


Brakemen 


4 
2 
5 

3 
4 

I 


119 

57 

259 

129 

145 

35 


29.75 
28.50 
51.80 

43.00 
36.25 
35.00 


28.94 


Butlers 


28.50 


Cab Drivers'and Hack men 
Car Drivers, Conductors 

and Motorraen 

Coachmen 


4:M5 

37.25 
43.24 


Drivers 


38.06 


Drovers 


41.50 


Engineers and Firemen . . 
£xpressmen. 


31 
2 


1,559 
107 


50.29 
53.50 


47.97 
50 16 


Fire Company Members.. 


36.17 


Fishermen & Oystermen. 
Highway Surveyors ..... 


10 


668 


66.80 


51.00 
61.00 


Hostlers 


7 328 


46.86 


43.14 


House Movers 


70.50 


Icemen 1 . .... 1 


1 


64.80 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



78 POBTY-FOURTH BEGI8TBATI0N REPORT. [1896. 

Table XI.— OCCUPATIONS AND AGES.— Continued. 



State of Rhode Island. 



1896. 



OCCUPATIONS. 



I 






JaDitors 5: 219 43.80 

Laborers 413 20,856 50.40 

Lamplighters ! ! 

Linemen 3' 126 42.00 

Lumbermen I I 

Mariners \ 7\ 482,68.86 

Messengers , 



44 Years and 7 Months, 
June 1, 1862, to Dec. 81, 1896. 



Milkmen 
Naval Officers 

Peddlers 

Pilots ' 

Porters | 

Sailors 

Sea Captains or Ship' 

Masters | 

Servants , 

Sextons 

Sinkers of Artesian Well«. I 

Soldiers 

Stage Drivers | 

Stevedores i 

Stewards 

Switchmen, gatemen, etc. I 

Teamsters I 

Theatre Managers 

Waiters v | 

Watchmen ! 

Well Diggers 

White washers i 

Wood Sawyers | 



2 

1 
7 
1 
3 
11 

10 

1 



96,48.00 

33 33.00 

224|32.00 

26:26.00 

105'35.00 

448 40.73 



666 
40 



61 
61 



1 
37 



11 
3 



68 
1,710 



66.60 
40.00 



61.00 
61.00 



68.00 
46.22 



443 
168 



40.27 
56.00 



Total. 



588 



VIIL 
Employments of Women. 



Actresses 

Agents , 

Artists 

Basket Makers. 



29,274 



49.79 



\ 1, 



43 43.00 



o 



76 

9,643 

17| 

9I 

2 

529 

2 

14 

19 

167 

21 

46 

262 

175 

25 

9 

2 

142 

8 

16 

19 

17 

579 

I 

119 

159 

4 

8 

5 



13,395 









.3,913 

476,779 

916 

449! 

153 

26,373| 

105! 

365 

941 

8,276 

1,159 

2,169 

12,541 

11,737 

1,121 

556 

95 

4,387 
398 
766 
834 
921 
27,040 



51.49 
49.44 
53.88 
49.89 
76.50 
49.85 
52.50 
40.35 
49.53 
49.55 
55.19 
47.15 
47.87 



07 
84 
77 
50 
89 
49.75 
47.87 
43.89 
54.18 
46.70 
4343.00 



4,865 
8,942 



40.88 
56.24 



29573, 



452 
239 



75 
50 
80 



658,956 49.19 

I 
I 

! 

11237.33 

59 59.00 

180 60.00 

14974.50 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



1896.] OCCUPATIONS AND AGES AT DEATH. 79 

Table XI.-OCCUPATIONS AND AGES.— Continued. 







State of 


Rhode Island. 






1896. 


44 Years and 7 Months, 
June 1, 1852, to Dec. 81, 1896. 


OCCfUPATIONS. 


i 
1 


i 

-5 


1 
1 


1 
< 

1 
1 


! 

* 


Box Makers 








5 
1 
1 
1 
4 
6 
351 

24 
1 

13 

29 

44 
1 
1 

14 

16 
1 

40 
2 
2 

56 

4 

105 

974 

11 
2 

19 
526 

30 

1 

1 

2 

147 

229 

6 

1 

10 


150 

34 

66 

28 

152 

170 

14,277 

1,519 

60 

379 

836 

2,361 

66 

25 

376 

699 

49 

1,938 

102 


30 00 


Broom and Brush 








34.00 


Braid 








66 00 


Cap 








28 00 


Chain 








38 00 


Cigar 








28.33 


Dress, and Seamstresses 
Boardinghouse Keepers. . 
Boatwomen 


"""ie 

1 


615 
76 


38! 44 
76.00 


40.67 
63.29 
60 00 


Bookkeepers 


3 
4 
4 


97 
113 
221 


32.33 
28.25 
55.25 


29.15 


Clerks and Saleswomen.. 
Cooks 


28.83 
53 66 


Farming 


66.00 


Hairdressers 








25 00 


Jewelers 








26 86 


Laboring 








43 69 


Lace Knitters 








49 00 


Laundresses 


5 
2 


220 
102 


44.00 
51.00 


48 45 


Matrons 


.^1 00 


Midwives 


128' 64 00 


Milliners 








2,005 

125 

6,325 

30,600 

647 

110 

554 

25,359 

1,139 

38 

40 

126 

6,787 

11,698 

166 

34 

291 


35 80 


Musicians ■ 






31 25 


Nurses 


8 
56 


337 


48 12 


60 24 


Operatives 


2,02036 07I 


31 42 


Physicians 






58.82 


Public Officers. 








55 00 


Rubber Workers 

Servants 


3 
35 


77 

1,640 


25.67 
46.86 


29.16 
48 21 


Sisters of Mercy 


37 96 


Stewardesses 








38 00 


Storekeepers 








40 00 


Superintendents 








63.00 


Tailoresses 


2 

8 


78 
399 


39.00 
49.88 


46 17 


Teachers 


51 08 


Telegraph and Telephone 
Operators 


27 67 


Upholsterers 






34 30 


Waitresses 


1 


24 


24 00 


29 10 




1 




Total 


149 


6,062 


40.681 


i 2,690 


109,959 


40.88 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



80 FORTY-FOUBTH BEGiaTBATIOS BEPOBT. [1896. 

Table XI. - OCCUPATIONS AND AGES.-Becapitulation. 







State of 


Rhode I 

44 Ye 
June 1, 


SLAND. 




1896. 


ars and 7 Months, 
1852, to Dec. 31, 1896. 


OCCUPATIONS. 




i 

< 
1 


< 
< 


■1 


i 

< 


< 

> 
< 


I. 














Tillers of the Soil 


187 13,311 


71.18 


6,846 


455,628 


66.55 


II. 














Professional and Per- 














sonal 


73 3,875 


53.08 


1,560 


86,618 


55.52 


III. 








Optional Activity 


175 


9,048 


51.70 


4,396 


247,961 


56.41 


IV. 














Outdoor. — Local 


131 


7,906 


67.22 


3,449 


193,951 


56.23 


V. 














Indoor — Active 


275 


13,882 


50.48 


5,909 


299,024 


50.60 


VI. 














Indoor. — Activity R e - 














8tricted 


327 


15,234 


46.59 


7,389 


331,585 44.88 


VII. 






Occupations at Large . . 


588 


29,274 


49.79 


13,395 


658,956 


49.19 


VIII. 














Employments of Women , 


149 


6,062 


40.68 


2,690 


109,959 


40.88 


All Classes 


1,905 


98,592 


51.75 


145,634 


2.383,682 


52 23 







Digitized by VjOOQIC 



1896.J 



OOOUPATIONS AND CAUSES OF DEATH. 



81 



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1 : 






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OCCUPATIONS. 


I. 

Tillers of the Soil. 


\ 01 

II 


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11. 

Professional and Per- 
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Arfiafa 


Assayers and Analytical 
Chemists 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



82 



rOBTY-POURTH EEGISTRATION REPORT. 



[1896. 



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1896.] 



OCCCPATIONS AND CAtJSES Of DEATH. 



83 



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FOBTY-POUBTH REGISTRATION REPORT. 



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OCCUPATIONS AND CAUSES OP DEATH. 



89 



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Digitized by VjOOQIC 



90 



FORTY-FOURTH REGISTRATION REPORT. 



[1896. 



'sisoinojaqnx 



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OCCUPATIONS AND CAUSES OP DEATH. 



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1896.] 



OCCUPATIONS AND CAUSES OF DEATH. 



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RESULTS AND OBSERVATIONS. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



GENERAL SUMMARY. 



The number of births registered in the State of Rhode Island, during 
the year 1896, was ten thousand seven hundred and fifty (10,750) ; the 
number of marriages, three thousand three hundred and twenty-seven 
(3,327) ; and the number of deaths, seven thousand five hundred and 
four (7,504). 

Table XIII. 

General results of Registration for ten years, 185Jf.-63, and for 
each of the last thirty-three years. 



Whole Number Living 

Years. of Births. Still-born. Births. Marriages. Deaths. 

1854-1868 38,042 1,471 36,571 14,943 24,230 

1864 3,892 138 3,754 1,844 3,360 

1865 3,955 ....177 3,778 1.896 3.405 

1866 4,902 172 4,730 2,318 2,970 

1867 5,127 163 4,964 2,844 2,889 

1868 5,372 212 5,160 2,285 2.912 

1869 5,245 220 5,025 2,289 8,882 

1870 5,215 234 4,981 2,362 3,238 

1871 5,678 223 5,455 2,336 3,344 

1872 6,143 .202 5,941 2,537 4,247 

1873 6,022 228 5,794 2,680 4,403 

1874 6,466 277 6,189 2,541 4,229 

1875 6,508 246 6,262 2,485 4,317 

1876 6,329 224 6,105 2,253 .4,116 

1877 6,235 242 5,993 2,282 4,450 

1878 6,714 248 6,466 2,824 4,441 

1879 6,850 216 6,184 2,396 .4,472 

1880 6,295 192 6,108 2,769 4,829 

1881 .... 6,761 264 6,497 2,750 5,016 

1882 6,825 253 6,572 2,634 5,074 

1883 7,046 253 6,798 2,611 5,282 

1884 7,305 272 7,033 2,568 5,141 

1885 7,028 271 6,757 2,488 5,889 

1886 7,621 293 7,328 2,750 5,849 

1887 7,668 276 7,392 2,839 6,340 

1888 7,840. , 295 7,545 3,022 6,594 

1889 8,220 329 7,891 3,029 6,259 

1890 8,550 296 8,254 8,196 6,934 

1891 9,426 272 9,154 3,320 6,620 

1892 9,270 348 8,927 3,502 7,396 

1898 10,048 .* 412 9,686 8,544 7,440 

1894 9,985 392 9,598 3,271 7,160 

1895 10,249 367 9,882 3,497 7,585 

1896 11,174 424 10,750 8,827 7,504 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



102 fORTY-P'OUllTH REdHSTRAtlON REI»ORT. [1896. 

During the period of forty-three years there were recorded, in Rhode 
Island, 269,506 births, of which number 10,097 were still-born, and 
259,409 were living children. 

During the same period there were recorded 103,171 marriages, or 
206,342 persons married, and 190,767 deaths. 

These results show that in every 26.7 births there was one still-born 
child, or that in every 1,000 births there were about 37 still-born and 
963 living children. 

The same results also show that the ratio of whole number of living 
births to the whole number of persons married, and to the whole num- 
ber of decedents respectively, during the same period, were as follows : 

Of persons married, Of deaths. 
For every 100 living? births tliere were 79.5 and 73.5 

The number of births in 1896 was 868 in excess of the previous year ; 
the number of marriages 170 less, or 340 less persons married; and 
there was a decrease of 31 deaths. 

For every 100 births there were : 

Of porsons married, Of deaths, 

Inl892 78.5 and 82.8 

In 1893 72.5 and 77.3 

In 1894 68.2 and 74.6 

In 1895 70. 8 and 76 . 2 

In 1896 61 .9 and 69.8 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



1896.] 








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[1896. 



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1896.] GENERAL SUMMARY. 106 

The varying numbers of the events of births, marriages and deaths 
ooeurring io the different towns, daring each of the six years ending 
December 31, 1896, are very concisely presented in Table XIV, and a 
ready means is thereby afforded of comparing and studying the changes 
in the vital movements of the people in the different precincts, during 
those years. 

The actual increase of population in the State, for the ten years 1885 
to 1805, was 80,474, or 26.45 per cent., or an annual average of two 
and six-tenths per cent. The increase by immigration must have been 
nearly twice as large as the natural increase. 



14 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



106 



FORTY-FOURTH REGISTRATION REPORT. 



[1896. 



Table XV. 

Births, Marriages, and Deaths in Rhode Tslandy in 1896, with the 

number and ratio of each in every IpOO of the Population of 

each Town, ana the ratio of excess of the Births over 

the Deaths in everij 1,000 of the Population. 



TOWNS AND DIVISIONS 
OP THE STATE. 



Barrlngton 1,090 

Bristol I 0,881 

Warren 8,780 

Bristol County 12,bl3 



Coventry 5.080 

East (Jreenwich 8,137 

West Greenwich 7(Xi 

Warwick 22,125 

Kent County i 31.048 

I 

Jamestown i 851 

Little Compton 1,110 

Middletown , 1.430 

Nkwpout City 21,734 

New Shoreham I 1,302 

Portsmouth ! 1,815 

Tiverton | 2,9iK) 

Newport County 31,217 

! 

BurriUville , ,5, 

Central Palls 10, 

♦Cranston 9, 

Cumberland 8, 

East Providence ' 10, 

Foster ] 

Glooester i l 

Johnston ' il, 

Lincoln ! 8, 



North Providencje. 
North Smithfield.. 

Pawtucket 

Providence City. 

Scltuate 

Smithfield 

Woonsocket 



25. 



729 
,3.54 
1,388 
,W4 
1,572 
'lOO 
03<] 
083 
020 
,.501 
.800 
i,704 
,3.34 
,.519 
,337 
,400 



Providence County 292,522 



Charlestown ' 977 

Exeter i 901 

Hopkinton | 2,703 

Narragansett District | 1,204 

North Kingstown ] 4,409 

South Kingstown 5.239 

Richmond 1,045 

Westerly i 7,774 



Washington County. 
State Institutions. . . 



.r 



4,972 



Whole State 393,891 



28 
150 
105 



l(i5 
7() 

8 

(j8r) 

934 



10 
19 
29 
007 
7 
SI 
71 



129 

570 

270 

2(15 

259 

24 

29 

280 

202 

03 

70 

938 

4,128 

58 

54 

804 

8,209 



17 
10 
45 

38 
81 

100 
19 

180 

490 



10,750 



22.5 
a5.2 

28.8 
30.7 
24.5 
20.5 
17.7 
21.0 
30.4 
24.0 
25.0 
27.5 
27.8 
10.4 
23.1 
33.9 



19.0 



27.3 



10.5 
22.0 



23.0 



21.2 i' 

11.3 I, 
31.0 1 1 

:io.i 



11.8 
17.0 
20.2 
27.9 
5.4 
17.1 
23.7 

24.8 



8 
5 
4 

157 
11 
8 
10 



28.3 



17.4 
11.1 
10.0 
30.1 
18.1 
19.1 
11.0 
23.2 



125 
01 
()3 
50 
12 
9 
42 
03 
3 
10 

.353 

1,588 

30 

17 

214 

2,009 



3.827 



11 






11.8 
14.1 
15.8 

14.0 



9.4 

12.8 



10.8 
10.2 



7.1 
9.0 
5.6 
14.4 
10.9 
8.8 
10.7 

18.1 



8.0 
15.3 
13.0 
14.0 
10.0 
20.5 
11.0 

7.2 
14.0 

2.3 

7.1 
20.9 
21.4 
17.0 
14.5 
10.8 



18.2 



10.2 
17.8 
24.4 
22.2 
13.4 
10.4 
12.2 
17.0 



10.7 



17.0 



19 
141 

00 

220 



110 
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10 

397 



8 
22 
90 
880 
23 
29 
50 



532 



8i7 

l.'i9 

108 

1.50 

17 

36 

222 

123 

31 

54 

010 

2,957 

69 

45 

529 



5,608 



15 
47 
20 
51 
94 
18 
115 



382 



7,504 



Si 



11.2 

20.6 
15.8 



17.9 



22.8 
19.1 
14.2 
17.9 



18.8 



9.4 
19.7 
13.9 
17.5 
17.7 
16.0 
16.7 

17.0 



17.3 
19.9 
16.9 
19.4 
14.8 
14.5 
22.0 
19.0 
14.3 
12.1 
19.8 
18.3 
19.9 
19.6 
19.3 
20.8 



19.2 



22.5 
16.6 
17.4 
15.8 
11.4 
17.9 
10.9 
14.8 



15.8 
100.1 



19.1 






K 



.6 

1.4 

11.9 

5.1 



18. 



11.3 



2.4 
-2.7 

6.8 

10.4 

-12.8 

l.l 

7.0 

7.8 



5.2 
15.3 
11.9 
11.8 
9.7 
6.0 
-4.8 
5.0 
16.1 
12.5 
5.7 
9.5 
7.9 
-3.2 
3.8 
18.1 



9.1 



-5.1 

—5.5 

.8 

14.3 

6.7 

1.2 

.7 

8.4 



4.3 



8.2 



♦ Not including State Institutions. 



1 Geometrically estimated. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



1896.] GENERAL SUMMARY. 107 



BIRTHS. Proportion to Population. 

In Table XV, on the preceding page, may be found the varying pro- 
portions of the number of births, marriages and deaths to every 1,000 
of the population in the various towns and cities in the State, as they 
occurred in 1896. 

In regard to births, the extreme range of proportion to population 
was from 5.4 in every 1,000, in New Shoreham, to 35.2 in Central Falls. 
Following Central Falls, in the line of largest proportion, are Woon- 
socket, with 33.9 ; and Coventry, with 32.5. Following New Shore- 
ham, in the line of the smallest proportion of births to population, are 
Exeter, wiih 11.1 in every 1,000; and West Greenwich, with 11.3. 

The proportion of births to population in all the counties entire, and 
in the cities of Central Falls, Newport, Pawtucket, Providence, Woon- 
socket, and the whole State, during the last seven years, are as follows : 

BIRTHS TO EVERY 1,000 PERSONS. 
1896. . 1895. 1894. 1893. 1892. 



Bristol County 23.0 25.2. . . 

Kent County 30.1 25.2. . . 

Newport County 24.8 24.8. . . 

Newport City 27.9 26.9. . . 

Providence County 28.3 26.8. . . 

Central Falls 35.2 

Pawtucket 27.5 28.4. . . 

Providence City 27.8 27.5. . . 

Woonsocket 33.9 32.4. . . 

Washington County 19.6 17.9. . . 

Whole State 27.8 25.7. . . 



....19.7 19.6 17.0.... 

....23.2. 22.9 23.0.... 

....25.2 26 3 23.1.... 

....27.8 30.1 24.4.... 

....28.2 27.9 26.9.... 



....24.7 27.0 24.5.... 

....28.9 27.9 27.8..,. 

....32.1 34.1 81.2.... 

....19.4 19.1 16.8.... 

....26 6 26.5 25.2.... 



1891. 


1890. 


.19.9... 


....19.8 


.25.3... 


....23.8 


.29.7.... 


. . . .28.6 


.33.8.,. 


....34.2 


.27.7... 


... 27.2 


.25.8... 


....25.2 


.29.3... 


....«5.9 


.29.9... 


....27.4 


.16.2.... 


....16.1 


.26.5.... 


....24.7 



PERSONS MARRIED. Proportion to Population, 

The proportion to the population, of persons married, can be more 
correctly shown in counties, or in cities and aggregates of towns, than 
in single towns. 

The following summary will present the proportions in the manner 
suggested, for the last seven years : 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



108 FORTY-FOURTH REGISTRATION REPORT. [1896. 

PERSONS MARRIED IN EVERY 1,000. 

1896. 1895. 1894. 1898. 1898. 1891. 1890. 

Bristol County 14.0 14.8 186 19.9 15.8 14.4 19.1 

Kent County 10.2 11.8 18.6 16.9 16.8 16.8 17.2 

Newport County 18.1 15.2 14.5 14.6 15.9 14.7 16.8 

Newport City 14.4 17.1 15.7 15.6 16.0 15.0 18.5 

ProTldenoe County 18.2 19.6 18.5 19.8 20.2 19.9 20.8 

Central Falls 15.8 

Pawtaoket 80.9 21.2 18.8 28.7 22.8 21.9 19.0 

Providence City 21.4 82.2 21.1 81.4 28.4 82.0 21.8 

Woonsocket 16.8 20.4 15.0 20.2 19.8 20.8 19.8 

Washington County 16.7 17.2 14.4 14.4 16.2 16.8 17.1 

Whole State 17.0 18.3 17.4 18.7 19.1 18.7 18.5 

DEATHS. Proportion to Population, 

The number of deaths, Id proportion to the living population, varies 
considerably from year to year in the different towns. The smaller the 
towns the greater, generally, is the annual variation. 

The highest rate occurred in Coventry, that is, 22.8 in every 1,000 of 
the population ; followed by Charlestown, 22.5, and Glocester, 22.0. 

The lowest death rate was in the town of Jamestown, that is, 9.4 in 
every 1,000 of the population ; followed by Barrington, with 11.2, and 
North Kingstown, with 11.4. 

The following summary will give the ratios of mortality to the pop- 
qlation in the cities and counties of the State, during the seven years 
ending December 31, 1896 : 

DEATHS IN EVERY 1,000 OP POPULATION. 

1896. 1895. 1894. 1898. 1898. 1891. 1890. 

Bristol County 17.9 ,. .20.9 16.5 19.9 80.0 20.5 82.1 

Kent County 18.8 17.4 19.8 19.4 20.7 18.0 17.6 

City of Newport 17.5 16.5 17.7 19.1 20.0 21.8 17.9 

Newport County 17.0 15.9 16.9 17.9 20.1 20.6 16.5 

Central Falls 19.9 

Pawtueket 18.3 20.1 18.7 19.6 21.7 18.8 21.9 

City of Providence 19.9 21.2. 20.8 20.9 20.9 19.5 81.7 

Woonsocket. 20.8 18.8 17.6 18.6 19.5 19.6 20.5 

Providence County 19.2 20.1 19.1 19.0 20.2 18.6 22.1 

Washington County 15.3 15.0 16.4 12.6 15.2 12.6........ 18.5 

Whole State 19.1 19.6 19.1 19.6 20.1 18.6 20.7 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



1896.] 



GENERAL SUMMARY. 



109 



The proportion of deaths to the liviDg population, in 1896, was larger 
than the annual average of the previous six years in Washington county, 
and smaller in Bristol, Newport* and Providence counties, and in each of 
the cities, Newport, Fawtucket and Providence. 

Table XVI. 

Proportion of Births^ Marriages and Deaths to the Population^ in 

the Whole State, in each of the last twenty-eight 

yearSy geometrically estimated. 







BIR1 


YEARS. 


Popu- 
lation. 


Number. 


1860 


211,880 


5,245 


1870 


218,565 


5,215 


1871 


225,968 


5,676 


1872 


233,637 


6,143 


1878 


241,561 


6,022 


1874.... 


249,765 


6,466 


1875,.... 


258,289 


6,508 


1876 


262,518 


6,829 


1877 


266,850 


6,235 


1878 


271,269 


6,714 


1879 


275,758 


6,350 


1880 


280,319 


6,295 


1881 


284,960 


6,761 


1882 


289,667 


6,825 


1883 


294,460 


7,046 


1884 


299,329 


7,805 


1885 


304,284 


7,028 


1886 


811,507 


7,621 


1887 


318,907 


7,668 


1888 


328,477 


7,840 


1889 


334,823 


8,220 


1890 


842,169 


8,550 


1891 


850,292 


9,426 


1892 


858,608 


9,270 


1893 


867,125 


10,048 


1894 


875,836 


9,985 


1895 


884,758 


9,882 


1896 


898,891 


10,750 



Of pjdp- 
ulation, 
one birth 
in every 



40.8 
41.9 
89.8 
88.0 
40.1 
38.6 
39.7 
41.5 
42.8* 
40.4 
43.4 
44.5 
42.1 
42.4 
41.8 
41.0 
43.8 
40.9 
41.6 
41.6 
40.7 
40.0 
37.2 
38.7 
36.5 
87.6 
88.9 
86.6 



MARRIAGES. 


Number. 


Of popu- 
lation, one 

person 
married in 




every 


2,289 


46.2 


2,862 


46.2 


2,836 


48.4 


2,587 


46.0 


2,630 


45.9 


2,541 


49.1 


2,485 


52.0 


2,253 


58.3 


2,282 


58.4 


2,324 


58.4 


2,396 


57.5 


2,769 


50.6 


2,750 


.51.8 


2,634 


55.0 


2,611 


56.4 


2,558 


58.5 


2,488 


61.2 


2,750 


56.6 


2,839 


56.2 


3,022 


54.0 


3,029 


55.2 


8,195 


53.5 



DEATHS. 



8,320 
3,502 
3,544 
3,271 
3,497 
8,827 



52.8 
51.2 
51.9 
57.4 
55.0 
69.2 



Number. 


Of popu- 
lation, ono 
death in 
every 


8,882 


62.5 


8,238 


67.5 


8,344 


67.6 


4,247 


55.0 


4,403 


54.8 


4,229 


59.0 


4,317 


59.8 


4,116 


68.8 


4,460 


60.0 


4,441 


61.1 


4,472 


61.7 


4,829 


58.0 


5,016 


56.8 


5,074 


67.1 


5,282 


56.7 


5,141 


58.2 


5,389 


56.5 


5,848 


58.3 


6,340 


60.8 


6,594 


49.5 


6,259 


53.4 


6,934 


49.8 


6,620 


52.9 


7,896 


48.5 


7,440 


49.3 


7,160 


52.5 


7,585 


51.1 


7,504 


52.5 



Deaths in 
every 1,000 
of the pop- 
ulation. 



16.0 
14.8 
14.8 
18.2 
18.2 
16.9 
16.7 
15.7 
16.7 
16.4 
16.2 
17.2 
17.6 
17.5 
17.9 
17.2 
17.7 
18.8 
19.9 
20.2 
18.7 
20.3 
18.9 
20.6 
20.2 
19.1 
19.6 
19.1 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



110 FORTY-FOURTH RE(3HSTRATlON ItElPORT. [1896. 

DuriDg the ten years 1871-1880 the average annual birth rate was 
one birth in every 39.7 of the population, or 25.2 births in every 1,000 ; 
during the ten years 1881-1890 the ave'rage birth rate was one birth in 
every 41.0 of the population, or 24.3 in every 1,000, a falling off of a 
proportion of nearly one birth in every 1,000 of the population. 

During the period of ten years 1871-1880 the average annual death 
rate was one in every 58.4 of the population, or 17.2 in every 1,000, 
according tp the returns. During the ten years 1881-1890 the average 
annual death rate was one in every 53.3 of the population, or 18.8 in 
every 1,000 of the living. From 1891 to 1896 the average annual death 
rate was one in every 51.7 of the population, or 19.4 in every 1,000 of 
the living. 

It must be remembered, however, that the returns during the last ten 
years have been more complete than in previous years. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



112 



FORTY-FOURTH REGISTRATION REPORT. 



[1896. 



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1896.] 



BIRTHS. 



113 



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Digitized by VjOOQIC 



BIETHS, 1896. 



The general statistics of births in Rhode Island, during the year 1896, 
derived from the returns sent to the office of the State Registrar, may 
be found on pages 2 to 8, inclusive, in Tables I, II and III. 

The whole number reported is 10,750, as before stated, and is 868 
more than the number in 1895. 

SEX OF THE CHILDREN. 

Of the 10,750 children whose births were registered in 1896, there 
were 5,461 males and 5,289 females. This gives 103.3 males to each 
100 females, or 508.0 males and 492.0 females in each 1,000 children. 

The following Table shows the number and sex, and the proportions 
of each sex of the children born in Rhode Island, during the ten years 
1854-1863, and in each of the last thirty-three years : 

Table XVII. 



Males to each Per 1.000 Births 

Years. Males. Females. 100 Females. Males. Females. 

1854-1863 19,880 18,686 103.6, or 508.8 and 491 .2 

1864 1,949 1,942 100.3, or 500 9 and 499.1 

1865 ; . . .2,096 1,857 112.9, or 530 2 and 469.8 

1866 2,546 2,356 108.0, or 519.4 and 480.6 

1867 2,665 , 2,464 107.0, or 518.7 and 481.3 

1868 2,745 2,627 104.5, or 511.0 and 489.0 

1869 2,685 2,560 104.9, or 511.9 and 488.1 

1870 2,679 2,536 105.6, or 513.7 and 486.3 

1871 2,878 2,800 102.8, or 506.9 and 493.1 

1872 3,085 3,058 100.8, or 502.2 and 497.8 

1873 3,135 2,887 108.6, or 520.6 and 479.4 

1874 3,311 3,155 104.9, or 512.1 and 487.9 

1875 8,362 3,146 106.9, or 516.6 and 483.4 

1876 3,291 3,038 108.3, or 520.0 and 480.0 

1877 3,163 3,072 103.0, or 507.3 and 492.7 

1878 8,402 3,312 * 102.7, or 506 7 and 493.3 

1879 3,259 3,091 102.4, or 513 2 and 486.8 

1880 8,241 8,054 106.8, or 514.8 and 485.2 

1881 3,498 3,263 107.2, or 517.3 and 482 7 

1882 3,509 3,316 105.8, or 514.1 and 485.9 

1883 3,548 8,498 101.4, or 503.5 and 496.5 

1884 8,718 8,592 108.4, or 508.3 and 491.7 

1885 8,591 8,487 104.4, or .510.8 and 489.7 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



116 



FORTY-FOURTH REGISTRATION REPORT. 
Table XVII.— Continued. 



[1896. 



Years. 
1886... 
1887... 
1888... 
1889... 
1890... 
1891... 



1893., 
1894. 
1895., 
1896. 



Males. 

..8,897., 
...8,968. 
, . .4,028. . 
,..4,193., 
...4,851. 
...4,986. 
...4,765. 



.6,105. 
.6,129. 
.5,186. 
.6,461 . 



Males to each 
Females. 100 Females. 

. . . .8,724 104.6, or 

. . . .8,700 107.2, or 

....8,817 105.4, or 

....4,027 104.1, or 

....4,199 103.5, or 

....4,500 109.5, or 

....4,605 105.8, or...., 

....4,943 108.8, or.... 

....4,856 105.6, or.... 

....4,746 108.2, or.... 

. . . .6,289 103.8, or. . . . 



Per 1,000 Births 
Males. Females. 
...511.8 and 488.7 
...517.5 and 482 5 
...513.1 and 486.0 
...610.0 and 490.0 
...508.8 and 491.2 
. . .522.6 and 477.4 
...514.1 and 485.» 
...506.1 and 491.9 
...513.7 and 486.8 
...519.7 and 480.8 
...508.0 and 492.0 



The average proporlion for forty-three years is 104,8 males to every 
100 females. At the end of five years from birth the number of each 
sex is about equal, the males having a larger mortality during that 
period. 

PROPORTION OF THE SEXES. Localities, 

In Table II, on pages 6 and 7, will be found the number of children 
born in the different divisions of the State during the year 1896, together 
with the number of each sex. 

The following Table will give more concisely the whole number of 
children born, arranged according to sex and locality, and the propor- 
tion of male children to every 100 female children : 



Table XVIII. 



BIRTHS, 1896. 



Males 

Females 

Total 

Males to each 100 females 



Is 


It 


Is 


189 


456 


63 


144 


478 


84' 


283 


934 


167 


965 


95.4 


98.8 



t; o o 

Ah 



886 
877 



1,763 
101.0 



G 






w 




^ 


O . 




1 






0) 

1 

i 




PlH 

287 


459 


Ah 


^ 


255 


311 


2,122 


468 


285 


296 


289 


479 


2,006 


401 


490 


607 


576 


988 


4,128 


864 


108.5 


105.1 


99.8 


93.7 


105.8 


115.5 



o 

.a 

5,461 
5,289 



10,750 
108.8 



Compared with the previous year the decrease in the proportion of 
male births in the whole State was about 4.9 per cent. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



1896.] 



BIRTHS. 



117 



The following Table exhibits the proportioDS of births of the sexes 
for the past thirty-foar yeara in the larger divisions of the State and in 
the whole State : 

Table XIX. — Number of Males to each 100 Females. 



BIRTHS. 



1863. 
1864., 
1866.. 
1866.. 
1867.. 
1868.. 
1869.. 
1870.. 
1871.. 
1872.. 
1878.. 
1874.. 
1876.. 
1876.. 
1877.. 
1878.. 
1879.. 
1880.. 
1881.. 
1882.. 
1888.. 
1884.. 
1885.. 
1886. 
1887. 
1888. 
1889. 
1890. 
1891. 
1892. 
1898. 
1894. 
1896. 
1896. 



•eg 



120.0 

106.8 

119.8 

109.4 

115.5 

117.4 

115.7 

126.4 

131.8 

109.2 

129.2 

98.7 

95.2 

142.1 

138.7 

120.5 

124.3 

117.2 

91.2 

94.7 

94.0 

105.0 

182.2 

120.0 

115.1 

98.1 

81.9 

96.5 

107.1 

120.0 

90.7 

103.4 

118.4 

96.5 



if 

Mo 


ll 

97.0 


III 


1^. 

111.4 


98.4 


101.8 


87.3 


90.6 


107.4 


97.8 


118.2 


108.8 


118.8 


118.8 


118.1 


108.4 


104.9 


106.4 


98.8 


117.8 


106.8 


104.5 


88.7 


100.2 


101.6 


102.4 


116.7 


102.7 


98.0 


107.5 


111.6 


100.0 


105.1 


104.9 


97.9 


182.5 


100.8 


96.2 


92.8 


109.1 


108.5 


95.7 


113.0 


117.9 


104.5 


109.0 


111.9 


101.3 


110.4 


102.9 


108.1 


97.7 


104.3 


109.1 


104.4 


108.5 


106.0 


106.8 


102.4 


98.5 


100.3 


104.9 


120.6 


94.8 


101.6 


106.8 


95.5 


108.6 


106.4 


106.7 


110.5 


118.6 


1024 


107.6 


111.3 


102.0 


105.9 


109.0 


110.2 


112.5 


103.1 


106.6 


97.6 


97.0 


103.5 


102.2 


111.7 


92.9 


102.5 


105.8 


107.8 


96.0 


104.8 


103.6 


81.7 


102.6 


106.7 


106.0 


121.7 


106.6 


108.9 


107.9 


106.1 


105.0 


103.4 


107.4 


122.0 


107.5 


103.6 


101.4 


113.0 


106.8 


108.5 


98.3 


110.4 


118.4 


107.0 


109.1 


102.1 


102.4 


110.7 


100.0 


101.8 


97.7 


l(H.l 


104.1 


102.4 


121.1 


110.2 


996 


116.8 


100.8 


106.0 


109.6 


95.4 


108.7 


102.4 


106.8 



So 
^ _ 

108.7 
103.4 

88.1 
124.0 
120.4 
136.5 
120.6 

99.5 
113.3 
110.6 
104.7 

94.0 
134.3 
103.7 

95.8 

78.8 
106.8 

95.4 
115.7 
105.7 
102.2 

99.0 
104.3 
121.7 
106.7 
110.2 
110.2 

97.4 
106.4 

98.5 
109.0 
106.5 

115.6 
106.5 



I 
o 

105.8 
100.3 
112.9 
108.7 
107.7 
104.5 
104.9 
106.6 
102.8 
100.9 
108.6 
104.9 
106.9 
108.8 
103.0 
102.7 
105.4 
106.1 
107.2 
106.8 
101.4 
103.4 
104.4 
104.6 
107.2 
105.4 
104.1 
103.6 
109.5 
106.8 
105.8 
105.6 
106.2 
103.3 



♦Including city of Newport, tlncludjnir cltleLS p/ Central Falls, Pftwtucket and Woonsocket, 
15 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



118 



FORTY-FOURTH REGISTRATION REPORT. 



[1896. 



There will be found in the following summary in the aggregate, the 
average number of males to each 100 females, born during the thirty- 
four years from 1863-1896, in the different divisions of the State : 

Bristol Coonty Ill .8 males to each 100 females. 

Kent County 106.6 males to each 100 females. 

Newport County^ 106.8 males to each 100 females. 

Providence County Townst 105.0 males to each 100 females. 

ProTidenoe City 104.9 males to each 100 females. 

Washington County 107.4 males to each 100 females. 

Whole State 108.1 males to each 100 females. 

BIRTHS AND SEASON. 



Table II, on pages 6 and 7 of this report, gives the number of births 
occurring in the different months of the year, in the several divisions 
of the State. 

According to this Table, the greatest number of births in any one 
month, in 1896, occurred in October, and the largest in any quarter 
in the fourth. 

The following Table shows the total number of children born in the 
State of Rhode Island, according to the returns, in each quarter of each 
of the last six years ; and also the aggregate number and the percentage 
of the aggregate of each quarter in forty- three years, from 1854 to 
1896, inclusive : 



QUARTERS. 



January— Maroh — 

April— Jime 

July— September. . . 
October— December 

Whole year , 



Table XX. 






















1854-1896 inclusive. 


1896. 


1885. 


1894. 


1893. 


1892. 


1891. 


Number. 


Per cent. 


2,604 


2,260 


2,868 2.874 


2,288 


2,195 


63,409 


28.60 


2,461 


2,345 


2,611 


2,291 


2,179 


2,271 


63,656 


28.68 


2,790 2,704 


2,624 


2,674 


2,422 


2,454 


70,258 


26.15 


2,895 1 2,578 


2,682 


2,709 


2,436 


2,506 


71.892 


26.67 


10,750' 


9,882 


9,985 


10,048 


9,270 i 9,426 


! 268,715 


100.00 



Table XX presents results showing that/ according to the registration 
of forty-three years, the average proportions of births to the whole 
number of births in the different quarters of the year, were as follows : 

♦ Including Newport city. + Including Pawtucket, Central Falls, and Woonsocket. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



1896.] BIRTHS. 119 

January— March 286.0 in every 1,000 births. 

April— June 886. Sin every 1,000 births. 

July— September 261 .5 in every 1,000 births. 

October— December 265.7 in every 1,000 births. 

The proportions of births in Rhode Island, in the diflPerent quarters 
of the year, to the whole number of births in 1896, were as follows: 

1. January— March 24.2 per cent, or 242 in every 1,000 

2. April— June 22.9 per cent., or 220 in every 1,000 

8. July— September 26.0 per cent, or 260 in every 1,000 

4. October -December 26.9 per cent, or 269 in every 1,000 

First six months 471 births in every 1,000 of whole number. 

Second six months 529 births in every 1,000 of whole number. 

BIRTHS. Sex and Seaso7i, 

In Table II, on pages 6 and 7, will also be found the number of births 
of each sex by months, as they occurred in the different divisions of the 
State, during the year 1896. From it we ascertain the number of each 
of the sexes born during each quarter of the year, with their relative 
proportions, and also the aggregates and proportions of the same for 
the whole State. 

The following Table will present a summary of the quarterly periods, 
number of births, and proportion of the sexes, for the same year : 

Per 1,000, 
Males to each each quarter. 

Males. Females. 100 Females. Males. Females. 

1. January— March 1,814 1,290 101.9 505 495 

2. April-June 1,240 1,221 101.6 504 496 

a July— September 1,480 1,360 105 . 1 518 487 

4. October— December. ...1,477 1,418 104.2 510 490 

Whole year 6,461 5,289 103.3 508 492 

The following Table shows the number of male children born to every 
100 female children, in each quarter of the last two years ; and also the 
proportion of births of male children to each 100 female children born 
during six periods of five years each, from 1866 to 1895, inclusive : 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



120 



FORTt-FOURTH REGISTRATION REPORT. 

Table XXI. 



[1896. 



YEARS. 



First Qaarter. . . . 
Second Quarter. 
Third Qaarter. . . 
Fourth Quarter. 

Total Average. . . 



1896 


1895 


6 years. 


5 years. 


6 years, 


6 years. 


6 years. 






1891-1896. 
104.6 


1886-1890. 


186M886. 


1876-1880. 


1871-1876. 


101.9' 96 2 

1 


104.8 


106.8 


106.0 


101.6 


101.6 


117.5 


107.8 


106.4 


104.8 


102.7 


104.7 


106.1 


109.6 


108.6 


104.6 


105.1 


107.1 


104.8 


104.2 

108.8 

1 


109.9 
106.2 


106.8 
100.5 


106.5 


102.5 
104.6 


106.2 
106.2 


106.5 
104.2 


106.2 



5 years, 
1866-1870. 

106.6 
107.8 
106.0 
104.8 

106.2 



The aboye Table shows the variation of the proportions of the sexes 
in the different quarters in the different years, and seems to conclusively 
determine that season has very little, if any, influence in the causation 
of sex. 

PAAfiNTAGE. 

By reference to Table I, page 4, in the division of births, there will be 
found the parentage of the children born in Rhode Island during the 
year 1896. It will be seen that of the whole number, 10,750, there were 
3,422 of native parentage, 5,292 foreign, and 2,036 of mixed parentage. 

By mixed parentage is meant the children born of native fathers and 
foreign mothers, and of foreign fathers and native mothers. 

Of native fathers and foreign mothers there were 1^039, and of foreign 
fathers and native mothers, 997. 

The following Table will show the number and parentage of the chil- 
dren born in the State, and the variations of the same from year to year, 
in each of the last four years ; and also the number and variations 
occurring in three periods of five years each, and two of ten years each, 
from 1858 to 1892, inclusive : 

Table XXII. 



PARENTAGE. 


1806. 

8,422 

5,292 

1,089 

997 


1 
1895. 

8,292 

4,760 

924 

906 


1894. 

8,292 

4,841 

902 

956 


1898. 


6 

years, 

1888 to 

1892. 


5 

years, 

1888 to 

1887. 


5 
years, 

1878 to 
1882. 


10 
years, 

1868 to 
1877. 

25,646 

26,856 

8,186 

4,077 


10 

1858 to 
1867. 


Native father and mother 

Foreign father and mother. . . . 
Native father, foreign mother. 
Foreign father, native mother. 
PArentai^e not stated 


3,808 

4,878 

9 56 

916 


16,511 
18,787 
4,021 
4,087 


15,001 

15,245 

8,044 

8,878 


14,169 
18,562 
2,827 
2,887 


20,821 

19,665 

1.600 

1,606 

298 




10,750 


















Total 


9,882 


9,985 


10,048 


48,806 


36,668 


82,945 


59,218 


48,666 







Digitized by VjOOQIC 



1896.] 



BIRTHS. 



121 



The following Table of percentages will show, in a different and per- 
haps clearer way, the same changes that have occurred in the proportions 
of the births in the different classes of percentage during the last three 
years; and during thirty-five years, from 1858 to 1892, inclusive, in 
three periods of five years each and two of ten years : 

Table XXIII. 



PARENTAGE. 


1896. 


1895. 


1894. 


5 years, 

1888 to 
1892. 

38.25 

48.14 

9.30 

9.31 


5 years,' 
1888 to 
1887. 


5 years, 
1878 to 
1882. 


10 years, 
1868 to 
1877. 


10 years, 

1858 to 
1867. 


Native father and mother 

Foreijrn father and mother. . . 
Native father, foreign mother. 
Foreign father, native mother. 


31.8.^ 

49 23 

9.67 

9.27 


33.31 

48.17 
9.35 
9 17 


32.97 
4S.48 
9.08 

9 52 


40.91 

41.58 

8.30 

9.21 


43.a3 

41.23 

6.95 

8.79 


48.36 

44.53 

,5.87 

6.74 


46.84 
45.36 
8.89 
8.91 


Total 


100.00 


100.00 


100.00 


100.00 


100.00 


100.00 


100.00 


100.00 







The registration of births, in 1896, is of interest as showing a larger 
proportion of children born of native fathers than of foreign fathers. 
A considerable number of those recorded as native fathers were them- 
selves children of foreign parentage. 

The percentage of children of mixed parentage was about the same, 
in 1896, as in the previous year. 

The following Table will present the percentages of children of native 
and of foreign-born fathers, and of native and foreign-born mothers, 
respectively, in each of the last three years, and in each of three periods 
of five years each and two of ten years each, from 1858 to 1892, in- 
clusive : 

Table XXIV. 



CHILDREN WITH 



1806. 



1895. 



1894. 



5 years, 

1888 to 



6 years, 

18^ to 

1887. 



5 years, 

1878 to 
1882. 



10 years, 
1868 to 
1877. 



10 years, 

1858 to 

1867. 



Native fathers... 
Foreign fathers., 

Native mothers. 
Foreign mothers 



41.50 ; 42.66 
58.60 57.84 



41.10 
58.90 



42.48 
57.62 



42.01 
57.99 



42.48 
57.52 



47.56 
52.44 



47.67 
62.43 



49.21 
51.79 



49.91 
50.09 



60.08 
49.92 



51.79 
48.21 



48.78 
51.27 



50.10 
49.90 



50.78 
49.26 



60.75 
49.25 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



122 FORTY-FOUBTH REGISTRATION REPORT. [1896. 

The percentage of the children born of foreign fathers and of foreign 
mothers, during 1896, was a little larger than in 1895. 

The number of native fathers of children born in 1896, was 1,828 less 
than the number of foreign fathers, and the number of native mothers 
was 1,912 less than of foreign. 



BIRTHS OF C^OLORED CHILDREN. 

The number of births of children of colored parentage reported for 
the year 1896 is 226. This number is 5 more than in 1895, and also 5 
more than in 1894. 

In regard to sex, the numbers and proportions were as follows, viz. : 
Males, 104 ; females, 122, or 85.2 males to each 100 females. 

As the number of colored persons in the State was, according to the 
census of 1895, 7,928, the ratio of births in this class would be 28.51 
per thousand, or 1 to each 35.08 colored inhabitants. 

The following summary will show the changes that have occurred 
from year to year, in the proportions of the sexes of colored children 
born in Rhode Island, during the last twenty-one years : 

Whole Males to each 

Years. Number. Males. Females. 100 females. 

1876-1886 1,762 849 918 98.0 

1886 212 117 96 128.0 

1887 211 Ill 100 111.0 

1888 202 109 98 117.2 

1889 194 87 107 81.8 

1890 188 89 94 94.6 

1891 178 86 87 98.9 

1892 182 94 88 106.8 

1898 208 91 .'....112 81.8 

1894 221 118 108 104.6 

1896 221 117 104 112.5 

1896 226 104 122 85.2 

The following Table will show the location, number, sex, etc., of 
colored births during 1896 : 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



1896.] 



BIBTH8. 



123 



Table XXV. 
Showing Number, Sex, etc., of Colored Births, J896. 



TOWNS AND CITIES. 

Bristol 

East Oreenwioh 

Warwick 

Little Compton 

Newport City 

Portsmouth 

Tiyerton 

Central Falls 

Cranston 

East Proyidence 

Pawtucket 

Providence Citt 

Scituate 

Smithfleld '. 

Charlestown 

Exeter 

Hopkinton 

Narragansett District 

North Kingstown 

South Kingstown 

Richmond 

Westerly 

Whole State 



Whole 
Number. 



1 

81 
1 
1 



Males. 



128 
1 

1 

1 

1 
1 
4 
1 

16 
1 
8 



11 



1 

d 

2 
6 
68 



104 



Females. 



6 
4 

1 
SO 

1 



6 

8 

65 

1 

1 



122 



COUNTIES. 



Bristol County. 



Kent County 12 



Newport County 34 



Proyidence County. ... 161 



Washington County. . . 28 
226 



NUMBER OF CHILD OF THE MOTHER. 

In the following Table will be found the number of the child of the 
mother born during 1896 ; that is, how many of the children born were 
reported as the first, second or third child, etc., of their respective 
mothers. The statistics on this subject begin with the year 1857, and 
the following Table includes the children reported during the last six 
years, and also the total for forty years, 1857 to 1896, inclusive : 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



124 



POBTT-POUBTH BEGI8TBATI0N BBPOBT. 

Table XXVI. 



[1896. 



Number of thb Child of the Mother, i 1891. 



First 

Second 

Third.. 

Fourth 

Fifth 

Sixth 

Seyenth 

Eighth 

Kinth 

Tenth 

Eleventh 

Twelfth .... 4 — 

Thirteenth 

Fourteenth 

Fifteenth 

Sixteenth 

Seventeenth 

Eighteenth 

Nineteenth 

Twentieth 

Twenty-first 

Twenty-second. 
Unstated 



2,345 

1,899 

1,880 

1,055 

782 

594 

392 

897 

234 

169 

114 

71 

40 



1892. 



; 2,888 
I 
1,754 

1,444 

; 1,060 

I 754 

520 

416 

311 

218 

149 

113 

75 

36 

18 

18 

10 

4 

1 

1 











Total 9,426 9,270 10,048 9,985 9,882 10,750 257,423 



2,500 
1,961 
1,484 
1,138 



449 

297 

224 

160 

107 

81 

44 

23 

12 

9 

3 

1 

1 



1 



100 



1894. 


1896. 


1896. 


2,37r 


2,829 


2,574 


2,026 


2,008 


2,125 


1,519 


1,512 


1,672 


1,106 


1,129 


1,233 


818 


895 


918 


578 


640 


666 


445 


429 


488 


806 


304 


387 


203 


203 


259 


148 


148 


161 


112 


102 


123 


78 


65 


71 


71 


36 


40 


28 


27 


26 


12 


22 


12 


12 


5 


13 


3 


2 


4 


4 


2 


3 





2 


3 


2 


























142 


22 


22 


9,985 


9,882 


10,750 



40 years. 
1857-1896. 

63,040 

51,123 

89,548 

29,749 

22.243 

16,278 

11,680 

8,318 

5,689 

3,815 

2,862 

1,509 

871 

447 

248 

131 

68 

35 

19 

8 

4 



There was aD increase of 868 Id the whole number of births in 1896 
from the number in 1895. 

There are varying differences in the proportions of all classes in the 
different years. 

The most of those in the class " Unstated " (number of the child of 
the mother) were Italians. 

There were three returns of births in the eighteenth, and three in 
the nineteenth classes. 

The proportion of each class to the whole number will be shown by 
the following Table, which gives the percentage of the children born in 
each of the last four years, who were respectively the first, second, third. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



1896.] 



BIRTHS. 



125 



etc., children of the mothers, and which will also give the average per- 
centage of each class of births, during a period of ten years, from 1868 
to 1877, inclusive, and of five years, 1878 to 1882, 1883 to 1887, and 
from 1888 to 1892, inclusive : 



Number op thb Child. 


1896. 


1895. 


1894. 


1893. 

24.88 
19.72 
14.77 
11.33 
8.21 


5 years 

1888 to 

1892. 

25.20 
19.77 
14.94 
11.10 
8.23 


5 years, 
1888 to 
1887. 


5 years, 

1878 to 
1882. 


10 years, 

1868 to 

1877. 


First 


23.94 
19.77 
15.56 
11.47 

8.54 

79.27 
20.68 


23.57 
20.32 
15.30 
11.42 
9.06 


28.81 
20.29 
15.21 
11.08 
8.19 


24.80 
19.22 
14.82 
11.05 
8.56 


28.1 
18.1 
16.9 
12.2 
9.1 


25 2 


Second 


20 7- 


Third 


15.5 


Fourth 


11.4 


Fifth 


8.4 






First to Fifth 


79.67 
20.83 


78.58 
21.42 


78.91 
21.09 


79.24 
20.76 


77.80 
22.20 


80.0 
20.0 
100.00 


81.1 


Sixth and over and unstated 


18.9 


Total 


100 00 


100 00 


100.00 


100.00 


100.00 


100.00 


100.00 















Table XXVII. 
Showing the Ages of the Fathers and Mothers of Children horn 

in 1896, 



!s OP Mothers. 


"^ so- 
il 

is 

!Z5 


j 
Ages op Fathers. \ 

\ 

\ 


i 


i 


1 


it 


1 


i 




18 years 1 














4 


19 years 6 


1 

152 

1,508 

1,023 

365 

94 

30 

8 

1 

1 
















24 


20-25 vears 367 


32 

252 

1,076 

709 

237 

68 

24 

10 

2 

1 


1 

26 

147 

708 

418 

164 

37 

11 

4 

2 


2 

1 
7 

70 
238 
151 


1 
1 
8 
9 
26 


2 

2 

1 


1 
1 


1 
1 
4 
1 
1 


1,252 


25-30 vears 124 


3,020 


80-35 years 336 


2,619 


85-40 years 117 


1,989 


40-45 years 30 


1,025 


45-50 vears 5 


447 


50-55 vears 4 


44 9 
14 3 


128 




39 




2 
1 










10 












5 
















7R on vpfl.rR 1 


















1 


Unstated 40 


48 18 


6 


4 


*" 


5 


2 


36 


187 


Number of Mothers. . . 531 


8,223 


2,429 


1,524 


529 


52 


44 


10,750 



10 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



126 FORTY-FOURTH REGISTRATION REPORT. [1896. 

The oativity of the mothers under 19 years was as follows ; the one 
at 13 years was Americao ; the one at 14 years was American ; the two 
at 15 years were AiAerican. 

Of the twenty-eight at 16 years, 25 were American, I Arabian, 2 
Italian. 

Of the sixty-three at 17 years, 26 were American, 13 Canadians, I 
English, 1 German, 4 Irish, 11 Italian, 2 Polish, 2 Portuguese, 1 Scotch, 
1 Turkish, and 1 West Indian. 

Of the one hundred and eighteen at 18 years, 82 were American, 16 
Canadian, 7 English, 6 Italian, 2 Nova Scotian, 1 Scotch, 2 Swedish, 
and 2 Portuguese. 

The 10,706 children were divided as follows, to mothers of different 
age periods : 

Number of Mothers. Per cent- 

Under twenty years 411 3.84 

Twenty, and under twenty-five 2,581 83.64 

Twenty.five, and under thirty 8,223 30.10 

Thirty, and under thirty-five 2,429 22.69 

Thirty-five, and under forty 1,524 14.24 

Forty, and under forty-five 529 4.94 

Forty-five, and over 69 55 

Total 10,706 100.00 

PLURALITY BIRTHS. 

The general statistics in relation to plural births, in Rhode Island, 
may be found on page 8, Table III. 

There were one hundred and nineteen cases during the year, one 
hundred and seventeen of which were twins, and two were triplets, 
thus making the number of two hundred and forty children. 

Of the 240 children of plural birth, 119 were males, and 121 were 
females. 

The cases occurred in the different divisions of the State as follows : 
Bristol county, 1 ; Kent county, 15 ; Newport county towns, 3 ; New- 
port city, 10; Providence county towns, 31* ; Providence city, 50; 
Washington county, 9. 

The following exhibit will show the parentage of children of plural 
birth in Rhode Island, in 1896, and number of each : 

Parents both native Americans 85 

" " British Americans 4 

'' " French, Canada 12 

* Including Central Falls, Pawtucket, and Woonsooket, 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



1896.] BIRTHS. 127 

Both parents born in England 6 

*' " Germany 1 

** " " Ireland 18 

Italy 7 

" Poland 1 

'' " " Portugal 2 

" " " Russia 4 

'* *' " Sweden 2 

Native father and British American mother 5 

Native father and English mother 6 

Native father and Irish mother 2 

Native father and Scotoh mother 1 

Belgian father and native mother 1 

British American father and native mother 4 

British American father and Irish mother 1 

English father and native mother 2 

English father and Irish mother 1 

Irish father and native mother 6 

Scotch father and native mother 1 

Scotch father and German mother 1 

W. Is. father and native mother 1 

Total bhrths 119 

Total children ,.240 

The months in which the plurality births occurred were as follows : 

January 6 April 9 July 12 October 11 

February 9 May 8 August 10 November 4 

March 11 June 9 September 16 December 14 

First Quarter 26 Second Quarter. . .26 Third Quarter. . . .38 Fourth Quarter. . . .29 

First half of year 52 Second half of year 67 

Total 119 

The general statistics of births, and number of cases reported in 
Rhode Island during a period of forty-three years, that is, from 1854 to 
1896. inclusive, are as follows: 

268,292 cases of single births giving 263',292 children. 

2,789 cases of twin births giving 5,578 children. 

27 cases of triple births giving 81 children. 

1 case of qoadruple births giving 4 children. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



128 FORTY-FOURTH REGISTRATION REPORT. [1896. 

Of the whole number of cases of child-birth (266,109) during the 
forty-three years, one in 95.4 produced twins, one in 986.6 produced 
triplets, and one in 266,109 produced quadruplets. 

Of the whole number of children born during the same period (268- 
955), ascertained from the reports, one in every 48 was a twin, and one 
in every 3,320 was a triplet. 

Of the 2,817 cases of plurality birth which have occurred in the State 
during the last forty-three years, there were 1,101 cases in which both 
parents were natives ; 1,331 cases in which both parents were foreign ; 
375 cases in which the parents were mixed, that is, one native and one 
foreign parent ; and 8 in which the parentage was not stated. 

The whole number of children born in plurality cases, during the 
forty-three years, was 5,663, of whom 2,870 were males, and 2,789 were 
females ; the sex of the remaining four was not given. 

STILL-BORN. 

The whole number of still-born children reported in Rhode Island, 
for the year 1896, was 424 ; this number is 57 more than for the year 
1895. 

The following are the numbers reported from the different divisions 
of the State: 

Bristol County 8 

Kent County 21 

Newport County Towns 7 

Newport City 40 

Providence County Towns 39 

Central Palls 20 

Pawtucket City 85 

Providence City 218 

Woonsocket , 21 

Washington County , 15 

Whole State » 424 

The following Table will give the number in each town from which 
still-births were reported, with the sex, parentage and color: 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



1896.] 



BIRTHS. 



129 



Table XXVIII. 
StiU'Bom, 1896, Locality, Numher, Sex, Parentage, and Color. 





1 


SEX 


PARENTAGE. 


COLOR. 


TOWNS AND DIVISIONS 
OF THE STATE. 


4 
2 


1 

1 
1 


4 

8 


1 


i 


1 


Bristol 


5 
8 


5 
3 




Warren 






* 1 

•7I" r 




Bristol Countt 


8 

8 

18 


6 

2 
12 
14 

1 
18 

2 

21 

2 

10 
8 
8 
4 
6 

18 
128 

14 
108 

1 
1 

2 

6 


2 

1 
6 


8 

8 

18 




Coventry 


1 

7 


2 
11 
18 

15 

1 
16 

12 
8 
5 
2 
5 
2 

24 
114 

12 
179 

8 




Warwick 








Kent County 


21 

1 
1 
40 
2 
8 


7 

1 

22 

2 

1 
26 

10 
8 
5 
2 

4 
2 
17 

90 
7 


8 

1 
25 
2 
2- 
81 

2 

8 
8 
8 
4 
5 

11 

104 

9 

154 

2 

1 
1 
2 
6 


21 

1 
1 
85 
2 
8 




Jamestown 




Middletown 




Newport 


5 


Portsmouth 


Tiverton , ^ 








Newport County 


47 

2 
20 
11 

8 

6 
10 

2 
85 
218 
21 


42 

2 
20 
11 

8 

6 
10 

2 

85 

208 

21 


6 


BurrillvlUe 


Central Falls 




Cranston 




Cumberland , 




East Providence 




Johnston 




Tiiiiooln .^ .. t - 1 .-.....,....,. 




Pawtucket 




Providence City 


15 


Woonsocket 






Providence County 


888 

2 

1 
1 
2 
9 


140 

1 

1 
8 


818 
2 

1 
1 
9 


15 


Hopkinton 


Narragansett 


1 


North Kingstown 


South Kingstown 


1 


Westerly 






Washington County 


15 
424 


10 
844 


5 
180 


12 
218 


8 
818 


18 
408 


2 
22 


Total 





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130 



FOBTY-FOURTH REGISTRATION REPORT. 



8UMMART OF 8BX OF STILL-BORN. 



[1896. 



The following Table shows the number and sex of the still-born 
children whose births were reported in Rhode Island daring each of 
the last five years, and also of a period of forty-three years, extending 
from January 1, 1854, to December 31, 1896 ; 





Table XXIX. 


1804. 








SEX. 


1806. 


1806. 


1808. 


1808. 


January 1, 1854, 

to 

Deo. 81, 1896. 


Hales 


244 

180 


828 

144 


811 
181 


235 

177 


217 
154 


5,078 
4,253 








Total 


484 


867 


802 


412 


871 


10,225 







The average proportions of the sexes of the still-born, for the period 
of forty-three years, were as follows : In every 100 still-births there were 
about 58 males and 42 females. 

Season of Still-Births — During 1896 the proportions in relation to 
season, by percentage, were as follows : 



1896. 

First Quarter 21.70 

Second Quarter .28.30 



1896. 

Third Quarter 24.76 

Fourth Quarter 25.24 



Fer oent. first half of the year 50.00 Last half of the year. 



50.00 



The births of the still-born in the different months of the year, 
although somewhat variable in number, do not, as a rule, show great 
discrepancies. 

PARENTAGE OF THE STILL-BORN. 

Of the 424 still-born children reported in 1896, there were 212 of 
native, and 212 of foreign parentage, reckoned by the nativity of the 
fathers, that is, the father's name given ; and 189 of native and 235 of 
foreign, reckoned by the nativity of the mothers, name of father giveA 
or not given. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



1896.] 



BIRTHS. 



131 



ILLEGITIMATES. 



In the following Table will be found the whole namber of illegitimate 
births returned during 1896, with the sex, color, parentage and locality 
of birth : 

Table XXX. 
Illegitimates^ 1896, 



TOWNS. 



Warren 

Coventry 

East Greenwich . . . 

Warwick 

Tiverton 

Newport City... 
Central Palls.. 

Cranston 

Cumberland 

Lincoln 

North Smithfield.. 
Providence City 

woonsocket 

Hopkinton 

Narrangansett — 
North Kingstown 
South Kingstown 

Whole State — 



142 



73 



2 

s! 

3 I 

2 ' 
I 
1 

6 

2 

5 

2 

2 

1 

81 

9 

1 



121 



21 



parentage. 



G8 



There were returns, during 1896, of 142 children of illegitimate pa- 
rentage. The number is 28 more than that of the previous year. 

Sex, — Of the 142, there were 73 males and 69 females. 

Color.— Of the 142 illegitimates born during 1896, 121, or 85.2 per 
cent., were white, and 21, or 14.8 per cent., were colored. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



132 



FOBTY-FOUBTH REGISTRATION REPORT. 



[1896. 



Parentage. — Of the 142, 88, or 62.0 per cent, of all, were born of 
native mothers, and 54, or 38.0 per cent., of foreign-born mothers. 
The colored illegitimates were all of native parentage. There were of 
the 121 white illegitimates, 67 born of native mothers, and 54 of foreign 
mothers. 

The ages of the mothers were as follows : 



Age. 

15 

16 


No, of 
Mothers. 

1 

6 

9 


Age. 

24 

25 


No. of 
Mothers. 

17 

6 


Age. 

88 

84 

86 

86 

42 

UDknown .... 


No. of 
Mothers. 


17 


26 

27 


4 

8 




18 


9 




19 


7 


28 


8 




20 


13 


29 

80 


2 

2 


2 


21 


21 

15 


Total 




22 


81 


8 


142 


23 


10 


82 


4 





Sixty-nine of the illegitimates were born of indigent, pauper or crim- 
inal mothers, in public, charitable or penal institutions. 

Sixty-three of these sixty-nine births occurred at the Lying-in-Hos- 
pital, in the city of Providence. 

The proportion of illegitimates to the whole number of births was 
about one in every 76 cases, or about thirteen in every 1,000, 



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MARRIAGES. 1896. 



The number of marriages registered in Rhode Island, during the year 
1896, was 3,327. This number is 56 more than in 1894, and 170 less 
than in 1895. 

The general statistics of marriage in 1896, in relation to season and 
number, in the different divisions of the State, may be found in Table 
IV, on the ninth page. 

The statistics in relation to the proportion to population of persons 
married in 1896, in each of the towns and general divisions of the State, 
may be found in Tables XV and XVI, on pages 106 and 109. 

The following Table will present the number of marriages, and the 
ratio of marriage to population, in each year for a period of thirty- 
seven years, 1860 to 1896, inclusive: 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



134 



FORTY-FOURTH REGISTRATION REPORT. 

Table XXXI. 



[1896. 



YEARS. 



I860 1 1,748 

1861 1,533 

1862 1,450 

1863 1 1,618 

1864 1,844 

1865 I 1,896 

1866 j 2,318 

1867 j 2,344 

1868 j 2,285 

1869 '2,289 



1870. 
1871. 
1872. 
1873. 
1874. 
1875. 
1876. 
1877. 
1878. 



2,362 
2,336 
2,537 
2,630 
2,541 
2,485 
2,253 
2,282 
2,324 



II 

O 



50.0 
56.8 
61.1 
54.7 
50.1 
48.7 
39.9 
39.8 
40.5 
47.5 
46.0 
46.5 
42.9 
41.3 
50.8 
52.0 
57.3 
56.6 
55.7 






20.0 
17.6 
15.1 
18.3 
19.9 
20.5 
25.1 
25.1 
24.8 
21.1 
21.7 
21.5 
23.2 
24.2 
19.6 
19.2 
17.5 
17.7 
17.9 



YEARS. 




1879 1 2,396 

1880 2,769 

1881 2,750 

1882 2,634 

1883 2,611 

1884 1 2,558 

1885 2,488 

1886 2,750 

1887 2,839 

1888 3,022 

1889 3,029 

1890 3,195 

1891 3,320 

1892 3,502 

1893 3,544 

1894 3,271 

1895 1 3,497 

1896 1 3,327 

Annual Average. . . 



57.8 
49.9 
50.3 
52.5 
54.4 
58.1 
61.3 
56.5 
55.8 
53.5 
57.8 
54.1 
53.5 
52.4 
53.6 
57.4 
55.0 
59.2 



53.2 



17.5 
20.0 
19.9 
19.0 
18.3 
17.2 
16.3 
17.7 
18.0 
18.7 
17.3 
18.4 
Id. 5 
19.1 
18.7 
17.4 
18.2 
17.0 



18.6 



SEASON. 



The following Table will show the number and percentage of mar- 
riages in Rhode Island, in each month and each quarter of the year 
1896, together with the aggregate number and percentage in each quar- 
ter for forty-three years, viz., from 1854 to 1896, inclusive- 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



1896.] 



mahriaoes. 
Table XXXII. 



135 



MONTHS. 



January •• 
February. 
March...., 



April. 
May.. 
June. 



July 

August 

September. 



October — 
November. 
December.. 



Is 

5?5 



2861 
276 1- 

8G81 
213 [ 
423 J 



Number of Mar- 
riages each Quar- 
ter, 1896. 






Ist Quarter.. 690 



20.74 



2d Quarter. .1,004 80.18 



2201 

246;- 8d Quarter... 773 



307 J 



3131 

355 y 

I 
192 J 



Total. 



4th Quarter.. 860 



23.28 



25.86 



3,387 100.00 





^00 


Number of Mar- 


11 

p 


riages per Quarter, 
48 yrs., 1854-1896. 


Ist Quarter. .22,286 


21.56 


2d Quarter... 26,494 


25,69 


3d Quarter... 24, 148 


23.41 


4th Quarter.. 30,272 


29.84 


*103,170 


100.00 



The largest Dumber of marriages id aDj ODe moDtb, diiriog 1896, 
occurred iD the moDth of Juue. For thirty-eight years previous to 
1892, the greatest Dumber of marriages was io the mooth of Novem- 
ber. Id 1892, 1893, 1894, aod iD 1896 the greatest Dumber of mar- 
riages was iu the mouth of JuDe. The rule has beeu as follows : The 
largest proportioD Id the last quarter ; the uext largest Id the seooDd 
quarter; followed by the third quarter; aud, fiDally, the first quarter 
baviug the smallest proportioD of aDy. Id 1893, 1894, aod 1896 the 
largest proportioD was iD the secood quarter. 

Duriug 1896 the proportioDS iu the differeot quarters, from the largest 
to the smallest, were as follows: Secoud quarter, 30.18 per ceut. ; 
fourth quarter, 25.85 per ceut. ; third quarter, 23.23 per ceut. ; first 
quarter, 20.74 per ceut. 

NATIVITY OF PERSONS MARRIED. 

The followiDg Table shows the number of marriages, accordiog to 
the Dativities of the parties, for each of the last four years, aud also 
♦Including 20, date not given, recorded previous to 1860. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



136 



FORTY-FOURTH REGISTRATION REPORT. 



[1896. 



for the aggregate of twenty-five years, from 1858 to 1882, inclusive, of 
five years, from 1883 to 1887, inclusive, and of five years, from 1888 
to 1892, inclusive : 

Table XXXIII. 



BIRTH-PLACE. 


1896. 

1,587 

1,021 

868 

856 


1895. 

1,649 

1,088 

390 

870 


1894. 


1898. 


5 years, 

1888-1892. 
Total. 


5 years, 

1888-1887. 

Total. 


25 years, 

1868-1882. 

Total. 


United States 


1,589 
1,048 

88? 

352 


1,577 

1,224 

851 

892 


7,818 
4,973 
1,687 
1,645 


7.157 
8,601 
1,828 
1,165 


s i 1 i g 


Foreign Countries 


Native groom, foreign bride. 


Foreign groom, native bride 


Not stated 


















Total 


8,827 


8,497 


8,271 


8,544 


16,068 


18,246 


54,784 





It will be understood that in the above enumeration the parent 
nativity of the persons married is npt considered, but the country 
where born. 

Parties born in the United States, although children of foreign born 
parents, are reckoned as natives. 

In the following Table are given the percentages by birth, of native, 
foreign and mixed marriages, in each of the last four years and in the 
aggregate of five years, 1888 to 1892, inclusive, of five years, 1883 to 
1887, inclusive, and of twenty-five years, 1858 to 1882, inclusive : 

Table XXXIV. 



BIRTH-PLACE. 

• 


1896. 


1895. 


1894. 

47.05 
81.89 
21.06 


1893, 

44.50 
34.54 
20.96 


5 years, 
1888-1892. 

48.62 
30.95 
20.48 


5 years, 
1883-1887. 


25 years, 

1858-1882. 


United States 


47.70 
80.69 
21.61 


47.16 
81.11 
21.78 


54.02 
27.19 
18.79 


61.80 


Foreign countries 


25.18 


Mixed nativity 


18.57 






Total 


1 1 
100.00 ino.oo ifio.nn 


100.00 


100.00 


100.00 


100.00 















It will be of some interest to notice that by the exhibit of the two 
preceding Tables, it is shown that, although the marriages of the native 
born (whether the issue of foreign boiu parents or natives) have, as a 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



1896.] 



Marriages. 



13? 



rule, increased in numbers^ they have also steadily decreased in propor- 
tion^ with two or three exceptional years, that is, to the whole number 
of marriages ; while the marriages of the class of the exclusively for- 
eign born have been, for the past thirty years, gradually increasing in 
proportion. 

There was a falling oflf of the percentage of marriages of the class 
of exclusively foreign born, during 1894, 1895, and again in 1896. 

Denominational. — The 3,327 marriages in 1896 were performed by 
clergymen of various denominations, or by civil authority, as follows : 

DENOMINATIONAL. 



Roman Catholic 1 ,267 

Baptist 521 

Protestant Episcopal 893 

Congregational S02 

Methodist 288 

Free Baptist 88 

Luther£Ui 83 

Universalist 58 

Christian 48 

Hebrew 89 

Presbyterian 83 

Justices of Supreme Court 31 

Unitarian 28 

Advent 25 

Seventh Day Baptist 20 



United Presbyterian 18 

Prhnitive Methodist 18 

Advent Christian 9 

Second Advent 7 

Friends Ceremony 4 

Recognized Church of Jesus Christ 8 

Faith 8 

Evangelical 2 

Disciples of Christ 2 

New Jerusalem 2 

Church of Christ 1 

Denomination not stated 44 

Total 8,827 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



138 



J'ORnf-^OURM RfiGlSTfiATlON REPORT. 



[1896. 



AGES OF THE MARRIED. 



Id the foIlowiDg Table the varying ages of persons married during 
1896 are presented : 

Table XXXV. 





AGES OF BRIDES. 


g 


AGES OF GROOMS. 






a 


IS 

3 




4 


s 


16 

S 


3 


8 


S 


2 


5 

1 

1 


Under 20 


51 
344 
116 

27 
6 


17 

711 

536 

130 

47 

21 

3 

1 


2 

111 

372 

162 

51 

16 

15 

5 


10 
61 
99 
44 
20 
17 
8 
2 


4 

17 
25 
36 
36 
15 
9 
6 


2 
7 

15 

22 

13 

11 

8 

3 

1 


1 

5 

6 
12 

7 
6 
3 
2 

1 
1 


1 

2 
4 
2 
2 
3 


2 
4 
3 
5 


1 

2 
3 
3 


1 
1 


1 


70 


20 to 25 


1,180 


25 to 30 


1,105 
450 


30 to 35 


35 to 40 


204 


40 to 45 


122 


45 to 50 


3 


80 


50 to 55 


47 


55 to 60 




31 


60 to 65 




1 


15 


65 to 70 




1 


... 


16 


70 to 75 








4 


75 to 80 








1 






3 
















Number of Brides 


547 


1,467 


736 


263 


148 


82 


44 


14 


14 


9 


2 


1 


3,327 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



1896.] 



MARRIAGES. 



139 



The extreme discrepancies in the ages of some couples married in 
1896 were not so frequent as in some previous years. 

The same results, in 1896, in relation to numbers in the different age 
periods, may be presented in a different and perhaps clearer way as 
follows : 

Table XXXVI. 





?i 










1896. 


^ 


^ 


s 




s 




? 
P 


s 


o 




2 




s 


3 




^ 


Males 


70 


1,180 


1,105 


4 


3 


Females 


547 


1,467 


736 


1 
5 








Total Dersons 


617 


2,647 


1,841 


8 







The whole number of persons in each division of ages, of both sexes, 
married in Rhode Island in each of the last thirty-one years^ that is, 
from 1866 to 1896 inclusive, is presented in the following Table : 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



140 



FORTY-FOURTH REGISTRATION REPORT. 

Table XXXVII. 



[1896. 



YEARS. 



1866.. 
1867.. 
1808.. 
1809.. 
1870.. 
1871 . , 
1872., 
1878.. 
1874., 
1875. . 
1870., 
1877., 
1878. 
1879. 
1880., 
1881. 



1883., 
1884. 
1885., 
1886., 
1887. 
1888. 
1889. 
1890. 
1891. 



1894. 
1895. 
1896. 



644 
642 
744 
697 
786 
768 
770 



081 
618 
689 
68H 
599 
498 
497 
484 
488 
505 
501 
582 
548 
596 
685 
668 
676 
613 
607 
617 



^ S 



1,931 1,025' 

I 

1,886, 1,104 

I i 

1,836 1,050' 

1,814 1,051' 

1,883| 1,084J 

1,914' 1,118 

2,073; 1,182' 

I I 

2,177, 1,156 

1,998' 1,179 

2,058 1,108 

1,7411 1,041 

1,745| 1,118 

l,882i 1,123| 

1,879 1,15«5' 

2.801 ! 1,2«J2' 

2,808! 1,410 

I 
2,126| 1,877 

2,108 1,870, 

i I 

2,027 1,289, 

1,973! I,**' 

2,133 1,552 

2,808, 1,552, 

I 

2,427 1,608 

1,492 

1,632 

1,442 



2,403 
2,693 
8,141 



3,011 1,729 

I 

2,777, U 

2,760 1,613 

2,763 1,887 

2,647, 1,841 



s 


B 


B 

© 


B 


B 


B 




419 


213 


127 


81 


59 


25 


21 


416 


211 


148 


91 


48 


87 


18 


432 


219 


188 


82 


61 


80 


29 


468 


227 


184 


79 


46 


85 


15 


415 


216 


159 


86 


64 


26 


24 


392 


228 


115 


78 


56 


85 


22 


434 


287 


131 


81 


61 


43 


21 


507 


258 


140 


87 


68 


35 


24 


459 


268 


159 


101 


52 


36 


39 


475 


258 


150 


101 


• 60 


82 


29 


450 


224 


154 


80 


53 


27 


19 


459 


244 


125 


92 


52 


46 


14 


441 


259 


162 


74 


49 


89 


20 


481 


272 


,«, 


78 


56 


89 


26 


556 


8',>9 


108 


91 


65 


88 


87 


547 


8118 


187 


107 


61 


8< 


81 


608 


801 


101 


102 


67 


86 


27 


480 


819 


188 


116 


78 


81 


20 


569 


807 


152 


114 


04 


48 


80 


540 


309 


163 


102 


57 


45 


27 


608 


288 


174 


103 


78 


24 


20 


607 


294 


162 


114 


49 


89 


23 


640 


380 


207 


105 


60 


36 


17 


712 


879 


182 


121 


66 


45 


8 


673 


820 


206 


102 


69 


41 


29 


635 


815 


158 


115 


64 


85 


21 


782 


•389 


201 


122 


60 


35 


80 


776 


436 


237 


133 


79 


47 


89 


680 


375 


183 


150 


74 


89 


29 


767 


417 


227 


142 


83 


49 


22 


713 


352 


204 


124 


61 


45 


24 



B 
1-2 


B 

8 


8 
B 


1 


8 

4 


1 




9 

3? 


8 
9, 


2 


.... 


49 
6 


8 






6 


1 






5 


6 

1 
1 






27 
9 


9 






9 


2 

4 


1 




9 

H 


2 
8 

1 
8 


2 

1 

1 

1 




11 
1 
2 


2 

8 






8 

1 






2 










9 


2 






1 
8 


1 

1 
1 
1 




4 

6 


4 
8 







In the following Table will be found the number and proportion of 
the persons married under 20 years of age, both sexes, in eight periods 
of five years each, from 1856 lo 1895, inclusive; for the whole period 
of forty years, and in 1895 and 1896 : 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



1896.] 



IIABBIAOES. 

Table XXXVIII. 



141 



6-TEAE PERIODS. 



^i 


"2 




Is 

B ^ 


II 


a| 






o» 




H^ 


Pk 


15,888 


8,294 


16,682 


2,406 


28,196 


3,419 


25,058 


3,696 


24,048 


3,267 


26,082 


2,516 


29,670 


2,727 


34,268 


8,249 


194,842 


24,574 


6,994 


607 


6,654 


617 



1856-1860 

1861-1865 

1866-1870 , 

1871-1876 

1876-1880 

1881-1885 

1886-1890 

1890-1895 

40 years, 1856-1895. 

1895 

1896 



20.79 

14.42 

14.74 

14.75 

18.59 

9.65 

9.19 

9.48 

12.61 

8.68 

9.27 



Per cent., first fifteen years 

Per cent., second fifteen years. 
Per cent., last ten years 



.16.87 
.12.60 



18 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



142 



FORTY-FOURTH REGISTRATION REPORT. 



[1896. 



PROPORTION OF SEX. 



Table exbibiting tbe percentages of grooms in eacb division of ages, 
in eacb of tbe last thirty-seven years : 

Table XXXIX. 



YEARS. 



1860. 
1861. 
1862 
1863. 
1864. 
1865. 
1866. 
1867. 
1868. 
1869. 
1870. 
1871. 
1872. 
1878. 
1874. 
1875. 
gj , 1876. 
1877. 
1878. 
1879. 
1880. 
1881., 
1882. 
1883. 
1884., 
1885. 
1886.. 
1887. 
1888. 
1889. 
1890., 
1891., 
1892., 
1898., 
1894.. 
1895.. 
U896.. 



6.0 
4.6 
4.2 
8.5 
4.8 
8.5 
5.8 
4.8 
4.1 
4.8 
4.8 
6.8 
4.8 
8.8 
4.1 
8.5 
6.1 
4.8 
8.9 
8.9 
8.6 
2.8 
2.2 
2.9 
2.5 
2.6 
2.5 
1.7 
2.8 
2.8 
3.8 
8.2 
2.3 
2.9 
8.0 
2.2 
2.1 



o 


s 


s 


s 




42.8 


26.9 


16.8 


5.7 


8.8 


44.6 


25.4 


15.5 


5.8 


4.2 


87.8 


27.9 


18.8 


5.9 


5.9 


88.0 


29.6 


17.2 


6.8 


6.9 


88.8 


27.8 


17.9 


7.4 


4.8 


87.0 


28.4 


18.9 


7.6 


4.7 


40.9 


27.0 


16.4 


6.8 


4.1 


40.1 


27.9 


10.8 


6.8 


4.1 


89.9 


28.2 


17.1 


6.1 


4.6 


89.6 


27.7 


18.6 


6.1 


8.8 


40.4 


28.1 


16.0 


6.4 


4.8 


40.1 


28.9 


16.5 


4.9 


4.8 


41.8 


28.2 


16.6 


5.2 


4.4 


42.4 


26.7 


17.0 


6.0 


4.1 


40.4 


27.2 


17.5 


6.4 


4.4 


40.9 


27.8 


17.6 


6.1 


4.2 


87.5 


28.6 


17.9 


5.6 


4.3 


86.0 


80.2 


18.7 


5.9 


6.9 


88.6 


29.0 


18.0 


6.8 


4.8 


87.8 


28.8 


19.8 


5.4 


4.8 


88.9 


27.5 


19.9 


5.8 


4.3 


87.2 


29.7 


19.5 


6.8 


4.0 


86.0 


31.4 


20.0 


6.1 


4.3 


86.2 


81.7 


17.7 


7.2 


4.3 


86.2 


29.1 


21.0 


6.2 


5.0 


34.7 


30.2 


20.9 


6.8 


4.8 


85.2 


81.9 


19.6 


6.8 


4.0 


87.1 


31.6 


19.6 


6.2 


8.8 


86.1 


81.1 


19.8 


6.5 


8.7 


87.6 


27.8 


21.3 


6.6 


4.4 


36.9 


30.8 


18.9 


6.1 


4.0 


44.7 


26.4 


17.2 


5.2 


3.8 


40.1 


29.3 


19.0 


6.1 


3.2 


35.3 


30.7 


21.0 


6.8 


3.8 


87.4 


29.3 


19.9 


6.8 


3.6 


36.0 


30.6 


21.0 


6.8 


3.9 


35.5 


83.2 


19.6 


6.1 


8.5 



3 

g 

100.0 
100.0 
100.0 
100.0 
100.0 
100.0 
100.0 
100.0 
100.0 
100.0 
100.0 
100.0 
100.0 
100.0 
100.0 
100.0 
100.0 
100.0 
100.0 
100.0 
100.0 
100.0 
100.0 
100.0 
100.0 
100.0 
100.0 
100.0 
100.0 
100.0 
100.0 
100.0 
100.0 
100.0 
100.0 
100.0 
100.0 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



1896.] 



MARRIAGES. 



143 



Table exhibiting the percentages of brides in each division of ages, 
in each of the last thirty-seven years : 

Table XL. 



YEARS. 


1. 


S3 

S 
8 


s 


s 


s 

o 




1 




fl860 


25.8 
29.6 
24.9 
24.9 
24.2 
22.6 
24.7 
25.4 
24.4 
24.1 
26.8 
24.6 
26.7 
25.3 
26.3 
23.9 
25.6 
23.4 
22.7 
22.8 
21.1 
19.0 
16.7 
16.2 
16.4 
14.9 
15.8 
15.9 
16.4 
15.1 
15.4 
17.4 
16.8 
16.2 
15.7 
15.2 
16.4 


44.1 
42.0 
41.3 
42.6 
43.4 
43.3 
42.9 
40.5 
40.9 
40.5 
39.4 
41.9 
40.5 
40.8 
38.1 
42.1 
39.8 
40.4 
40.4 
40.7 
44.2 
43.0 
44.8 
44.2 
43.0 
44.6 
42.4 
44.1 
44.3 
48.7 
47.3 
49.9 
45.9 
43.0 
47.0 
43.0 
44.1 


17.0 
15.2 
16.7 
16.9 
17.8 
19.1 
17.4 
19.3 
18.1 
18.7 
17.9 
19.1 
18.4 
17.5 
19.3 
16.8 
17.6 
18.8 
19.3 
19.4 
18.0 
21.5 
20.9 
20.6 
21.8 
21.8 
24.5 
22.8 
92.1 
21.5 
20.4 
17.0 
20.1 
22.0 
20.0 
23.4 
22.1 


9.1 

7.8 
11.8 

9.8 
10.3 
11.0 
11.0 
10.0 
11.6 
12.1 
10.8 
10.1 

9.9 
12.0 
11.1 
11.8 
12.0 
12.1 
12.2 
12.1 
12.0 
11.2 
12.6 
13.2 
18.2 
13.2 
12.5 
12.1 
12.4 
14.7 
12.0 
11.4 
18.0 
13.3 
12.3 
12.8 
12.4 


2.6 
4.1 
4.1 
4.1 
2.9 
3.5 
2.7 
8.4 
3.8 
3.4 
8.9 
3.1 
2.2 
2.7 
3.9 
4.0 
3.7 
8.6 
3.8 
8.0 
8.3 
8.8 
3.9 
4.3 
4.2 
3.8 
3.3 
8.5 
8.7 
3.4 
3.6 
8.1 
8.1 
4.1 
8.4 
4.3 
3.8 


1.4 
1.3 
1.2 
1.7 
1.4 
1.5 
1.3 
1.4 
1.7 
1.2 
.1.2 
1.2 
1.8 
1.7 
1.3 
1.4 
1.8 
1.7 
1.6 
2.0 
1.4 
1.5 
1.1 
1.5 
1.9 
1.7 
1.5 
1.6 
1.1 
1.6 
1.3 
1.2 
1.1 
1.4 
1.6 
1.3 
1.2 


100.0 




1861 


100.0 




1862 


100.0 




1863 


100.0 




1864 


100.0 




1865 


100.0 




1866 


100.0 




1867 


100.0 




1868 


100.0 




1869 


100.0 




1870 


100 




1871 . 


100.0 




1872 


100.0 




1873 


100.0 




1874 


100.0 




1875 


100.0 




1876 


100.0 


U 

Q 

H 


1877 


100.0 


1878 


100.0 


1879 


100.0 


n 


1880 


100.0 


1881 


100.0 




1882 


100.0 




1883 


100.0 




1884 


100.0 




1885 


100.0 




1886 


100.0 




1887 


100.0 




1888 


100.0 




1889 


100.0 




1890 


100.0 




1891 


100.0 




1892 


100.0 




1893 


100.0 




1894 


100.0 




1895 


100.0 




1896 


100.0 









Digitized by VjOOQIC 



144 



FORTY-FOURTH REGISTRATION REPORT. 



[1896. 



It will be DOticed, io the preceding Tables, that the proportions of 
persons married of both sexes, under twenty years of age, largely de- 
creased daring the last decade. 

Of grooms, the proportion, compared with the first decade, has de- 
creased about 39 per cent., and of females more than 36 per cent. also. 

The proportion of males married, between the ages of twenty and 
twenty-five, has decreased nearly 6 per cent., and has correspondingly 
increased in the more advanced age periods. 

The proportion of females married, between twenty and twenty-five 
years of age, has increased a little more than 7 per cent., while of those 
between twenty-five and forty there has been an increase of proportion 
similar to that of males. 

NUMBER OF TIMES MARRIED. 

There will be found in the following Table the number of grooms 
and of brides who were married for the first, second, third, etc., time 
in 1896 : 

Table XLI. 





First 
Marriage. 


Second 
Marriage. 


Third 
Marriage. 


Fourth 
Marriage. 


Total. 


Qrooms , 


2,867 
2,964 


429 
844 


29 
19 


2 


8,8?r 


Brides 


8,327 







7'he proportion of grooms married for the first time, in 1896, was 
86.2 per cent, of the whole number, and the proportion of brides mar- 
ried for the first time was 89.1 per cent. 

The following Table will show not only the number of times each of 
the parties were married, but also the number of bachelors and widow- 
ers who married spinsters, the number who married widows of first or 
second widowhood, etc., and of spinsters and widows who married 
bachelors, and widows of the second, third or fourth marriage, etc. : 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



1896.] 



marriages. 
Table XLII. 



145 



GROOMS. 



First marriage..., 
Second marriage. 
Third marriage. . . 
Fourth marriage. . 



Totalbrides 2,964 844 8,827 8,827 



BRIDES. 



259 



166 
157 
19 



2,867 



29 
2 



It will be seen, by Table XLII, that 171 bachelors married widows, 
5 of whom married brides that had been twice widowed. Of the 460 
widowers who married in 1896, 268 married spinsters, and 192 married 
widows. Of the widows who married widowers, 14 had been twice 
married previously. 

MARRIAGES OF PERSONS OF COLOR. 

The number of marriages of persons of color in Rhode Island, in 
1896, was 102. This includes seven marriages in which one of the 
parties was white. The number and color of the individuals were, 
therefore, 197 persons of color and 7 persons white. The white per- 
sons were one male and six females. The marriages, however, may be 
properly included in the above class, inasmuch as the offspring of such 
marriages are persons of color. 

The number reported during 1896 from the different towns was as 
follows, viz. : 

Bristol 1 

Warren 2 

East Greenwich — 1 

Warwick 2 

Jamestown 1 

Newport 20 

Portsmouth 1 

Central Falls 1 

Providence City 65 

Hopkinton 1 

Narragansett 2 

North Kingstown 1 

South Kingstown , 1 

Richmond 1 

Westerly 2 

Total 102 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



146 



FORTY-FOURTH REGISTRATION REPORT. 



[1896. 



Marriage of Chinese — There were five Chinese men married in Rhode 
Island, in 1896. These all married white women, four of whom were 
natives ot the United States, and one of Montreal, of English parent- 
age. 

MARRIAGES OF THE DIVORCED. 

The following Table will give the towns from which returns of mar- 
riage with the facts of divorce were reported during 1896, the whole 
number of marriages of divorced persons, whether of one or both 
parties ; also whether the second or third marriage of the divorced 
groom or bride : 

Table XLIII. 



TOWNS. 



Providbnce City. 

Barrlngton 

Bristol 

Warren 

Coventry 

Warwick 

Jamestown 

Newport 

New Slioreham... 

Burrillvllle 

Central Falls... 

Cranston 

East Providenoe.. 

Johnston 

Nortli Smltlifleld., 

Pawtucket 

Soituate 

WOON SOCKET 

Exeter 

Ilopkinton 

Narragansett..... 
North Kingstown 
South Kingstown. 
Westerly 

Whole State 



184 



"1. 



199 



85 



114 



So 



79 



11 



1o 



So 



111 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



MARRIAGES. 



147 



There were 184 marriages, in 1896, in which one or both of the par- 
ties had been divorced. 

The proportion of the number of marriages of which one or both of 
the parties had been divorced, to the whole number of marriages, was 
about one in every 18, or a little more than 5^ per cent. 

But the proportion of divorced persons married during 1896, to the 
whole number of persons married in the same year, was about one in 
every 33, or about 3 per cent., or 30 in every 1,000. 

The number of divorced persons married, in 1896, was 10 less than 
in the previous year. 

These 184 marriages of divorced persons were performed by clergy- 
men of the different denominations, or by civil authority, as follows : 



Baptist 55 

Methodist 27 

Congregational 19 

Unlversallst 16 

Protestant Episcopal 11 

Christian 9 

Free Baptist 8 

Unitarian 7 

Justices of Supreme Court 6 

Advent 3 

Presbyterian 8 

Second Advent 3 



Lutheran 2 

Primitive Methodist 2 

Roman Catholic '8 

Seventh Day Baptist 2 

Advent Christian 

Evangelical 

Hebrew 

Latter Day Saints 

New Jerusalem 

United Presbyterian 

Unknown 3 



Marriage and Education — Of the number of persons married, in 
1896, 361 signed their marriage certificates with a mark. The follow- 
ing will show the number of males and females who did so, and their 
nativity : 



Whole No. 



Native. 



Males 

Females. 



Foreign. 
.... 127 
.... 151 



Total 361. 



278 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



DIVORCES, 1896. 



According to the returns made to the Secretary of the State Board 
of Health (State Registrar) by the clerks of the Supreme Courts of the 
different counties of Rhode Island, the number of applications for di- 
vorce, during 1896, was five hundred and twenty-six (526). 

The number of divorces granted, during 1896, was three hundred and 
sixty-three (363). 

There were 10 more applications, during 1896, than during the pre- 
ceding year, and the number of divorces granted was 10 less. 

Divorces are decreed for the following seven statute causes, viz. : 

1. Adultery. 

2. Extreme cruelty. 

3. Wilful desertion for five years of either of the parties, or for a 
shorter period, in the discretion of the court. 

4. Continued drunkenness. 



5. Neglect or refusal to provide necessaries (having ability) for the 
subsistence of a wife. 



6. Gross misbehavior and wickedness other than aforesaid. 

7. Impotency. 

Divorces are also decreed, or marriages set aside, in the discretion of 
the court, for ascertained affinity, consanguinity, idiocy, insanity, peni- 
tentiary crimes, and bigamous or otherwise illegal marriage. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



1896.] 



DIVORCES. 



149 



The following Table shows the number of applications for divorce, 
and the number granted, in 1896, in each county of the State ; also the 
causes alleged for the applications : 

Table XLIV. 





03 

a 
o 




Causes Alleged. 


< 


COUNTIES. 


1 

o 

1 

9 
30 

9H 


1 

1 

1 

7 
21 
18 


1 

< 

9 
4 


1 

o 

2 

9 
13 


1 

8 
13 


fig 

§ 
3 

Q 


li 


5 

0) 

•S 




1 


i 
1 


II 

eS >> 

II 

h^ as 


Bristol 


el . 


28 


Kent 


17 
17 


6 








68 


NewDort 


10 f 








59 


Providence 


446 


304 


60 


17^ 


191 


113 


291 


80 




«!.... 


911 


Washington 


1? 


18 


<■? 


2 


g 


1 


7 








20 


Whole State 


526 




36S 


7*1 


199 


??0 


13S 


S^8 


98 


— 


3 


_ 


1076 





















There were, during the year 1896, five hundred and twenty-six (526) 
applications for divorce, and the whole number of causes alleged was 
ten hundred and seventy-six (1,076). There was, therefore, an average 
of more than two causes alleged in each application. 

The causes alleged why divorce should be granted, in the applications 
during 1896, were 160 more in number than in 1895. 

In order to show the actual number of applications, and the number 
of divorces granted in each of the last twenty-four years, the following 
summary is presented : 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



160 FORTY-FOURTH REGISTRATION REPORT. [1896. 

Applications 
I Applications Divorces refused or continued 

for divorce. granted. or withdrawn. 

1873 261 173 88 

1874 276 242 34 

1875 227 158 69 

1876 254 198 58 

1877 257 178 79 

1878 258 196 62 

1879 255 246 9 

1880 847 278 74 

1881 860 268 82 

1882 889 271 68 

1883 821 257 64 

1884 320 266 54 

1885 293 227 66 

1886 886 257 79 

1887.. 322 24H 74 

1888 304 224 80 

1889 866 274 92 

1890 827 244 88 

1891 362 275 87 

1892 412 296 116 

1893 529 801 228 

1894 506 280 .-... 226 

1895 516 873 143 

1896 526 363 163 



24 years, total 8,264 6,086 2,178 

The average annual proportion of decrees of divorce granted during 
the last twenty-four years, to the applications therefor, was nearly 74 
per cent. 

During the last ten years the proportions were as follows : 

Years 1887, 1888, 1889, 1890, 1891, 1892, 1898, 1894, 1895, 1896. 

Per cent 77.0 73.6 74.8 74.6 76.0 71.8 56.9 55.3 72.3 69.0 

The proportion of divorces granted^ in 1896, to the whole number of 
marriages during the same year, was one divorce to every nine and two- 
tenths marriages. 

The proportion of applications for divorce to whole number of mar- 
riages, during the year, was one application to every six and three- 
tenths marriages. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



1896.] 



DIVORCES. 



151 



The following Table shows the number of divorces granted in each 
county, and in the whole State, in each of the last twenty-eight years, 
and the proportion of marriages to each divorce granted in each year : 

Table XLV. 



YEARS. 



1870 
1871 
1872. 
1878 
1874 
1875 
1876 
1877. 
1878 
1879. 
1880. 
1881. 
1882. 
1888 
1884 
1885 
1886. 
1887. 
1888 
1889 
1890. 
1891 
1892, 
1898 
1894. 
1895. 
1896. 



Bristol 
County. 



o q5 

.so 
t 



10.6 
22.7 
16.8 
10.2 
16.2 

8.9 
50.0 
14.5 
12.0 
26.0 
18.8 
12.1 
20.1 
15.0 
15.8 
16.7 
23.0 
16.0 
75.0 
15.8 
12.5 
27.5 

8.4 
49.5 
38.0 
16.0 
10.9 
12.4 



Kent 
County. 



Newport 
County. 



o 

« o 



12.5 
11.8 
17.9 
15.7 
9.8 
8.0 
8.8 
12.8 
16.3 
13.3 
9.0 
9.4 
7.3 
10.3 
11.5 
8.0 
18.6 
11.0 
8.0 
13.5 
8.3 
12.1 
11.2 
12.4 
23.8 
9.0 
9.9 
7.5 



5® 



.2 Pi 



27.7 
26.3 
49.7 
22.9 
21.9 
29.0 
23.4 
20.5 
26.0 
12.8 
24.1 
17.6 
16.9 
13.0 
21.2 
15.7 
11.2 
12.3 
13.4 
46.0 
14.0 
232.0 
12.6 
11.6 
9.9 
12.3 
21.8 
11.8 



Providence 
County. 



120 
152 
123 
149 
131 
190 
120 
148 
134 
156 
195 
208 
207 
221 
214 
209 
186 
194 
187 
188 
211 
196 
214 
236 
235 
207 
318 
304 



o o 

1 



13.8 
11.3 
18.3 
12.6 
14.8 
10.0 
14.9 
11.1 
12.4 
10.9 
9.1 
9.7 
10.0 
8.9 
9.2 
9.3 
10.1 
10.9 
11.8 
12.5 
11.2 
12.3 
11.2 
11.6 
11.5 
12.4 
8.8 
8.8 



Washington 
County. 



O 0) 

t 

I. 



15.5 
9.3 
11.4 
8.9 
33.7 
11.6 
20.5 
8.8 
9.9 
17.8 
9.7 
17.0 
11.0 
16.2 
13.3 
8.2 
15.0 
7.3 
7.9 
16.5 
10.8 
8.8 
14.3 
10.4 
8.0 
6.8 
11.2 
16.1 



Whole 
state. 



162 
200 
161 
200 
178 
242 
158 
190 
178 
196 
246 
273 
268 
271 
257 
266 



274 
244 
275 
296 
301 
280 
373 
363 



S 



14.1 
11.8 
14.5 
12.7 
15.2 
10.5 
15.7 
11.5 
12.8 
11.9 

9.7 
10.1 
10.4 

9.7 
10.2 

9.6 
11.0 
10.7 
11.4 
13.5 
11.1 
18.0 
12.1 
11.8 
11.8 
11.7 

9.4 

9.2 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



152 FORTY-FOURTH REGISTRATION REPORT. [1896. 

The ratio of divorces granted in the entire State, during 1896, to the 
whole number of marriages during the same year, was one divorce to 
about every nine and two-tenths marriages, as previously stated. 

During the ten years 1869 to 1878, inclusive, the ratio of divorce to 
number of marriages was one divorce to eVery thirteen ; during the ten 
years 1880 to 1889, inclusive, the ratio was one divorce to every ten 
and seven-tenths marriages. 

The average of the last five years was one divorce to about every 
ten and eight-tenths marriages. 

During the twenty-eight years 1869-1896, the average proportions 
of divorce to marriage, in the several counties and the State, have 
been as follows : 

Bristol County One divorce to every 2.15 marriages. 

Kent County One divorce to every 11.9 marriages. 

Newport County " One divorce to every 81 .2 marriages. 

Providence County One divorce to every 11 .2 marriages. 

Washington County One divorce to every 12.3 marriages. 

Whole State One divorce to every 11.6 marriages. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



1896.] 



DIVORCES. 



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Digitized by VjOOQIC 



DEATHS, 1896. 



The number of deaths registered in Rhode Island, daring 13 S6, ac- 
cording to the returns made to the State Registrar, was seven thoiisaDd, 
Ove hundred and four (7,504). 

This number is larger by 344 than that of the year 1894, and 31 
less than that of 1895. 

The death rate (19.1 in every 1,000 living persons) was five-teotbs 
less than that of the previous year. 

The following summary will show the death rates per 1,000 for each 
of the last five census years, in comparison with the last five years : 

1875. 1880. 1885. 1800. 1805. 1802. 1896. 1894. 1895. 1696. 
16.7 17.5 17.7 20.7 19.6 80.1 19.6 19.1 19.ff 19.1 

Since 1876 the returns have been more complete than previously, and 
during the last ten years few deaths have occurred in the State which 
were not reported. 

On the following page will be found the death rates, by counties, for 
thirty-six years : 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



1896.] 



DEATHS. 



155 



Table XLVII. 

Death rates per IfiOO living, by counties, for thirty-six years, from 

1861 to 1896, inclusive ; also the average rate of each period 

of five years each, from 1861 to 1895, inclusive, 

for the whole State. 



YEARS. 



Five years, 1861-1865.. 

1866 

1867 

1868 

1869 

1870 

1871 

1872 

1878 

1874 

1876 

1876 

1877........ 

1878 

1879 

1880 

1881 

1882 

1888 

1884 

1885 

1886 

1887 

1888 

1889 

1890 

1891 



1894. 



1896. 



17.7 

19.2 
17.0 
15.7 
17.9 
15.6 

16.8 
21.1 
18.4 
14.7 
14.9 

14.7 
18.2 
17 5 
13.2 
19.2 

17.9 
16.5 
17.7 
17.7 
16.3 

19.2 
18.2 
21 3 
17.6 
22.1 

20.5 
20.0 
19.9 
16.5 
20.9 

17.9 



15.9 

14.2 
15.1 
13.7 
16.7 
13.5 

17.5 
16.1 
13.8 
13.2 
14.9 

11.7 
13.1 
14.2 
15.1 
14.9 

16.5 
15.3 
14.6 
17.1 
16.4 

17.5 
15.5 
18.4 
20.1 
17.6 

18.0 
20.7 
19.4 
19.8 
17.4 

18.8 



1 


. « 

1 

17.7 


18 9 


17.3 


16.6 


15.0 


16.4 


14.7 


17.0 


13.2 


16.0 


14.1 


15.5 


12.2 


15.9 


14.5 


21.2 


19.0 


22.0 


10.8 


17.7 


18.5 


17.5 


13.5 


16.8 


12.4 


18.7 


13.7 


18.3 


14.8 


17.2 


14.5 


18.5 


15.7 


19.8 


17.2 


19.7 


17.7 


20.8 


14.5 


17.8 


14.5 


18.5 


15.0 


19.2 


15.1 


21.1 


18.0 


21.0 


14.7 


19.2 


16.5 


22.1 


20.6 


18.6 


20.1 


20.2 


17.9 


19.9 


16.9 


19.1 


15.9 


20.1 


17.0 


19.2 



12.4 

11.4 
10.9 
10.0 
12.8 
12.0 

12.3 
14.7 
15.1 
13.7 
15.5 

15.9 
12.8 
13.0 
11.1 
12.7 

11.9 
11.0 
9.8 
12.6 
14.0 

15.0 
15.5 
16.0 
14.6 
13.5 

12.6 
15.2 
12.6 
16.4 
15.0 

15.3 






17.1 

16.11 
15.6 

16.7}- 

15.6 

14.9 

15.4 
19.1 
20.2 
16.8 
16.7 

15.9] 

17.2 

17.2 

16.2 

17.5 

18.1 
18.4 
19.1 \ 

16.9 
17.7J 

18.8 
19.9 
20.4 
19.0 
20.7J 

19.6 
20.1 
19.6 
19.1 
19.6 

19.1 



STATE. 

ANNUAL AVERAGE OP 
PIVE-YBAR PERIODS, 

1861-1895. 



..17.1 per 1,000 living. 



..15.6 per 1,000 Uvlng. 



..17.5 per 1,000 living. 



..16.8 per 1,000 living. 



..18.0 per 1,000 living. 



..19.8per 1,000 living. 



.19.6 per 1,000 living. 



Annual average, thirty-five years, 1861-1895 17.8 per 1,000 living. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



156 



FORTY-FOURTH REGISTRATION REPORT. 



[1896. 



SEX OF DECEDENTS. 

Of the 7,504 persons whose deaths were returned, during the year 
1896, 3,874 were males, and 3,630 were females ; the ratio standing at 
106.7 males to each 100 females, or about 516 males and 484 females 
in every 1,000 decedents. 

The following Table will show the number and proportion of males 
and females among the decedents in Rhode Island, during the ten years 
1853 to 1862. inclusive ; also in each of the thirty-four years from 1863 
to 1896 inclusive, and for the entire period of forty-four years: 

Table XLVIII.—DEATHS. 



10 years, 1853-1802- 

1863 

1804 

1865 

1866 

1867 

1868 

1869 

1870 

1871 

1872 

1878 

1874 

1875 

1876 

1877 

1878 

1879 

1880 

1881 



1888.. 
1884.. 
1885.. 
1886.. 
1887. 
1888., 
1889., 
1890. 
1891. 



1894. 
1895. 
1896. 



Males. Females. 
.10,030 11.269... 



Males to 
every 100 females. 

96.9 

102.2 

92.4 

98.1 

101.5 

99.7 

94.3 

ICO. 6 



1,050 96.2 



1,621 1,586. 

1,633 1,727. 

1,686 1,719. 

1,497 1,473. 

1,442 1,447. 

1,418 1,499. 

1,696 1.686. 

1,588 

1,021 1,723 94.1 

2,118 2,129 99.4 

2,166 2,237 95.5 

2,111 2,118 99.7 

2,108 2,209 95.4 

1,909 2,147 91 .7 

2,182 2,818 92.0 

2.101 2,280 94.8 

2,183 2,289 9-5.4 

2,360 2,463 96.0 

2,307 2,.')49 96.8 

2,487 2,587 96.5 

2,627 2,055 99.0 

2.486 2,655 93.6 

2,607 2,782 93.7 

2,883 3,016 93.9 

3,177 8,168 100.4 

8,199 8,895 95.4 

8,093 8, 1 66 97 . 7 

8,501 8.483 102.0 

3,341 8,279 101 . 9 

3,725 3,671 101 .5 

8,789 8,651 103.8 

3,559 3,601 98.8 

8,799 3,736 101 .6 

8,874 3,680 106.7 



44 years 95,015. 



98.0 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



1896.] DEATHS. 157 

The following Table of births, during the same period of time as the 
preceding, will show by comparison the different proportions of the 
sexes in the two classes of events : 

Table XLIX.-BIRTHS. 



Males to 
Males Females. every 100 females. 

10 years, 1853-1862 18,377 17,260. . «,. 106.4 

1863 1,892 1,788 v 105.8 

1864 1,949 1,942 100.3 

1865 2,096 1,857 112.9 

1866 2,546 2,356 108.0 

1867 2,655 2,464 107.0 

1868 2,745 2,627 '. 104.5 

1869 2,685 2,560 104.9 

1870 2,679 2,536 104.9 

1871 2,878 2,800 105.8 

1872 3,085 3,058 '. 100.9 

1873 3,135 2,887 108.6 

1874 3,311 3,155 104.9 

1875 3,362 8,146 106.9 

1876 3,291 8,038 108.3 

1877 3,163 3.072 103.0 

1878 3,402 3,312 102.7 

1879 3,259 3,091 105.4 

1880 3,841 3,054 106.1 

1881 3,498 8,263 107.2 

1882 3,509 3,316 105.8 

1883 y . 3,.548 3,498 101.4 

1884 3,713 3,592 103.4 

1885 3,591 8,437 104.4 

1886 3,897 8,724 104.6 

1887 3,968 3,700 107.4 

1888 4,023 3,817 105.4 

1889 4,193 4,027 104.1 

1890 4,351 4,199 103.2 

1891 4,926 4,500 109 .5 

1892 4,765 4,505 109.3 

1893 5,105 4,943 103.3 

1894 5,129 4,856 105.6 

1895 5,136 4,746 108.2 

1896 5,461 5,289 103.8 

44 years 138..564 181,415 ia5.4 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



158 



FORTY-FOURTH REGISTRATION REPORT. 



[1896. 



* SEASON AND MORTALITV. 

The whole number of decedents, and the sex of the same, in each 
month of the year 1896, and in each division of the State, may be 
found in Table V, on the tenth and eleventh pages. 

The influence of season upon mortality may be further illustrated by 
the following Table, which shows the number and percentage of deaths, 
compared with the whole number of deaths, in each quarter of each of 
the last five years, and in the aggregate for forty years, 1853 to 1892, 
inclusive : 

Table L. 



SEASON. 



January-March, 

April-June 

July- September 
Oct. -December. 



Total. 



1896. 



1 

B 




1,833 


24.48 


I,85C 


24.73 


2,212 


29.48 


1,603 


21.86 


7,504 


lUO.OO 



s 

3 

1,962 
1,678! 
2,091 
1,809, 

7,535 



95. 


J894. 


1893. 


1892. 


40 years, 
1853-1892. 


I 


s 

9 


c 
Si 


1 


§ 

o 

9i 


1 




1 

B 

3 




a. 


1.919 


26.80 


1,870 


25.13 


2,108 


28.44 


^ 


Pu 


26.04 


37,488 


24.02 


22.20 


1,696 


23.69 


1,827 


24.56 


1,624 


21.96 


88,437 


21.43 


27.75 


2,056 


28.71 


2,074 


27.88 


2,160 


29.20 


45,069 


28.^8 


24.01 


1,489 


20.80 


1,669 


22.43 


1,509 


20.40 


40,056 


25.07 


100.00 


7,160 


100.00 


7,440 


100.00 


7,396 


100.00 


156,045 


100.00 



Comparing the percentages of 1896 with those of the forty years, we 
find that of the first quarter is .41 per cent, larger; the second quarter 
is 3 30 per cent, larger ; the third quarter .60 per cent, larger ; and the 
last quarter 4.31 per cent, less than for the average of the forty years. 
The greatest mortality for any one season of any year is usually found 
in the third quarter, but in 1890, owing in large measure to the epi- 
demic of infiuenza, the first quarter had the largest mortality. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



1896.] 



DEATHS. 



159 



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o 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



160 



FOBTY-FOURTH REGISTRATION REPORT. 



[1896. 



NATIVITY OF DECEDENTS. 

There may be found in Table I, on pages 2-5, the number of dece- 
dents in 1896, by division of the two classes of native and foreign born. 

Of the whole number of decedents, 7,504, 5,294 were native born, 
that is, were born in the United States, and 2,210 were born outside of 
the United States. 

PARENTAGE OF DECEDENTS. 

Of the whole number of decedents, 7,504 reported in 1896, 3,088 
were of native, and 4,416 were of foreign and unknown parentage. 

By the term ** foreign parentage " is meant the decedents whose 
fathers were born in some other country and not in the United States. 
The grandchildren of the foreign born are reckoned as of native pa- 
rentage, if their fathers were born in the United States. 

The following eleven towns reported a larger number of decedents of 
foreign /)a?'en^ti^e than of native, namely: Warren, Warwick, Biirrill- 
ville. Central Falls, Cumberland, Johnston, Lincoln, North Smithfield, 
Smithfield, Pawtucket, Providence and Woonsocket ; also the State In- 
stitutions at Cranston. 

These numbers varied from a moderate ex^cess to three or four times 
as many of foreign as of native parentage. 

The following Table gives the number and proportion in every one 
thousand deaths of decedents of native and of foreign parentage, in 
each of the last five years ; and in the aggregate for thirty-five years, 
or from 1858 to 1892, inclusive: 

Table LII. 



I 



1896. 



1895. 



PARENTAGE. 

S 

Native 3,088 

Foreign 4,416 

Total ' 7,504 



S 

5^ 



411.5 3,244 
588 5 4,291 



1000.0 7,535 



480.5 
569.5 



1000.0 



1894. 



3,054 
4,106 



7,160 



426.5 3,101 
573.5 I 4,389 



_L 



416.8 
583.2 



1892. 



3,216 
4,180 



lOOO.Ol 7,440 1000.0, 7,396 

I I I 



434.8 
565.2 



1000.0 



85 years, 
1858-1892. 



a 

3 



81,419 



169,757 



521.0 
479.0 



1000.0 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



1896.] DEATHS. 161 

AGE OF DECEDENTS. 

In Table I, on pages 2-5, may be found the aggregate and average 
age of all tbe decedents whose deatbs occurred in 1896, and witb the 
age of each sex, in each town and county in the State. 

By that Table it will be seen that the average age of all the male 
decedents in the State, in 1896, was 30.86 years, and that the average 
age of all the female decedents, in the same year, was 34.47 years ; 
the average age of all decedents, of both sexes, was 32 61 years. 

The average age of the total decedents in the State, in 1896, was 
very nearly one and one-half years less than the average for 1895. 

The average age of the male decedents, in 1896, was more than 
three-quarters of a year less, and the average age of the female dece- 
dents was two years less than in the previous year. 

The following Table v;ill present, separately, the average age of the 
male and female decedents, and the average age of all decedents in 
each year for thirty-six years ; also the average age in seven periods of 
five years each, from 1861 to 1895, inclusive: 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



162 



i'ORTY-FOtJRTH BEdHSTRATION REl^ORT. 

Table LIII. 



[1869. 



YEARS. 



V I ■''3 



^^J\ti 



'^^ I Average Age, 






5-year periods, 
1861-1895. 



1861 26.95.30 58 28.82 

1868 29M 82.65' 81.15 



1868. 
1864. 
1865. 

1866. 
1867. 



28.29 90.86 
28.13 30.43 



26.38 

81.18 
32.16 



28.97 



85.07 



29.56 
29.40 
27.69J 

83.091 



I 



35.86 , 34.01 



1868 80.47 I 35.08' 32.85 



1869 28.62 81.29 

1870 .S1.02 82.75 

1871 32.57 84.43 

1872 28.41 31.15 

1878 26.18 28.62 



.82.42 



1874. 
1875. 

1876. 
1877. 
1878., 
1879. 
1880. 



28.03 
29.72 

I 81.47 
29.25 

'29.02 
81.29 



I 



31.66 
32.75 

33.21 
81.56 
31.11 
33.24 
32.06 



1881 30.99 i 34.07 



1888. 
1884., 
1885. 



I 
.131.33 

.33.04 

. 32.29 

. 33.5S 

.33.02 



35.57 
37.44 
35.12 



80.25 
81 .90 J I 

33.52 
29.77 

27.42>- 80.16 

28.86 
81.27 



32.371 1 
30.45 I 
SO.OOH 81.21 



80.86 



32.551 
38.50 
35.55 
38.76 



.33.90 



1886 

1887 1 30.97 I 82,91 

1888 33.17 i 35.74 

1889 I 82.20 .35.74 

1890 31.04 34 26 

I I 

1891 82.70 : 36.28 

1892 82.96 i 37.75 



35.60 . 34.59 J 
34.91 ' 34.011 



' 30.97 33.99 



I 



1894 1 32.47 

1895 ; 81.70 

1896 1 30.86 



34.40 
36.49 



31.95 
^.53 
34.00 
32.62 

34.471 
35.34 1 
32.46 
33.44 
34.08 



.83.42 



.83.96 



34.47 1 32.61 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



1896.] 



DEATHS. 



163 



The above Table shows that the average longevity of the decedents 
in Rhode Island increased nearly five years, during a period of thirty- 
five years, ending with 1895. 

The following Table will present some of the facts of the preceding 
as occurring in the different divisions of the State, as well as of the 
State at large. It will show the average age of the decedents in each 
of the larger divisions of the State, in each of the last four years, and 
also the average of each of seven periods of five years each, compris- 
ing the thirty-five years from 1858 to 1892, inclusive: 

Table LIV. 



Divisions 
OF THE State. 



Bristol County 

Kent County 

Newport County 

♦Providence County... 

Providence City 

Washington County.... 



18%. 



40.88 
30.92 
87.27 
29.74 
31.38 
44.95 



1895. 



43.94 
33.15 
39.22 
31.90 
31.70 
48.a') 



45.71 
30.55 
42.91 
29.09 



1893. 



45.55 
28.95 
39.11 
29.24 



82 44 31.16 
45.00 48.80 



Whole State 32.61 34.08 33.44 32.46 34.19 33.97 31.86 30.28 I 81.66 80.73 29.42 



is 



39.76 
32.22 
40.63 



88.45 
37.66 
42.41 



I 
31.67 ; 81.83 

88.44 I 32.19 

46.77 ' 43.89 



00 >» 

OOtO 



GCtA 



86.68 
37.11 
3921 
80 60 
29.50 



83.61 
86.20 
40.68 



SB >» 



85.12 
84.77 

40.04 



28.46 25.26 
27.19 25.45 



41.01 41.14 39.67 



I 



84.78 
85.81 
88.54 
29.16 
28.50 
30.87 



U 



35.56 
32.15 
85.01 
28.44 
25.78 
84.21 



By reference to Table LIV, it will be seen that the average age of 
all decedents during the last five years is four and one-quarter years 
greater than the first period of five years, 1858-1862, notwithstanding 
the low average of 1893 and 1896. 

PERCENTAGE OF DECEDENTS BY DIFFERENT AGES. 

In Table VI, on pages 12 to 17, inclusive, will be found the number 
of deaths in 1896, in each town and each county, of each sex, and in 
each period of life, with the percentage of the whole number of deaths 
in each division to the population of the same according to the census 
of 1895. 

The following Table shows the percentage of decedents in each di- 
vision of ages, to whole number of deaths, in each of the last six 
years, and in the aggregate for three periods ; one of twenty years and 
seven months, from June Ist, 1852, to December 31, 1872, inclusive; 
one of ten years, from 1873 to 1882, inclusive ; and one of ten years, 
from 1883 to 1892, inclusive: 

* Bxcliisive of Providence City. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



164 



forty-fourth registration report. 
Table LV. 



[1896. 



PERIODS OF LIFE. 


1896. 

24.4 

4.7 
5.9 

35.0 

8.1 
4.4 

8.0 
8.0 
7.0 
8.9 
10.0 
9.(» 
5.0 
1.0 

1(H).0 


1895. 

21.7 
5.3 
6.2 

33.2 

3.6 
4.2 
8.6 
7.5 
8.0 
8.6 
10.3 
9.8 
5.3 
.9 

100.0 


1894. 

28.1 
4.8 
5.1 

83.0 

2.7 
5.1 
8.6 
7.4 
8.5 
8.9 
10.2 
9.8 
5.0 
1.8 

100 


1803. 

23.2 
5.2 
5.3 


1892. 


1891. 


10 years, 
1883 to 1892. 


=1 

S o 
>*^ 
oS 

18.9 
7.C 
8.4 

*1.9 

5.0 
5.8 
9.2 

1 7.8 
i 6.9 

8.2 
8.8 
5.1 
1.1 




Under 1 year 

1 and under 2 


22.0 
4.9 
4.0 


22.6 
5.4 
4.6 


1 20.4 
* 5.6 i 
5.8 

' 31.8 

i ... 

i" 

■ 8.7 

1 7.9 

7.5 

8.5 

1 

9.7 
' 9.9 
1 5.9 

1.5 

1 100.0 : 

1 1 


17.8 
' 8.8 


2 and under 5 


' 8.7 






Total 


.33.7 

3.9 
4.5 
7.9 

8.0 
8.4 
8.9 
10.0 
8.9 
4.8 
1.0 

100.0 


30.9 

2.4 

4.8 
8.3 
8.2 
8.0 
9.0 
11.0 
9.9 
6.3 
1.2 

lOO.O 


32.6 

2.5 
4.0 
8.5 
8.4 
7.7 
9.2 
10.8 
9.9 
5.6 
1.8 

100.0 


1 85.3 


5 and under lo 


4.8 


10 and under 20 


6.0 


20 and under 30 


9.6 


90 and under 40 


1 

1 8.4 


40 and under 50 


1 

1 7.8 


50 and under CO 


I 7.0 


60 and under 70 


1 76 


70 and under 80 


1 

7.2 


80 and under 90 


5.1 


Over 90 and not stated 


1 

1 1.1 






Total 


100.0 


100.0 







Compared with the average of tliirty years, ending with 1882, the 
average proportion of the mortality of children under one year of age, 
(iuring the last six years, was 4.6 per cent., or about 46 in every one 
thousand deaths more than the average in the longer period. 

Compared with the previous year the proportion of decedents in 
1896, under one year of age, was 2.7 in every one hundred more. 

The following Table will present the varying proportions of deaths 
to whole number of deaths, in four different periods of life, from 50 
years of age to 90 years, grouped in three periods of averages of ten 
years each, and one period comprising the ten years, 1883-1892; in 
1893, 1894, 1895 and 1896. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



1896J 



deaths; 
Table LVI. 



166 



Aqb of 
Decedents. 


6.7pr.ct. 


^ 


1* 


1^ 


1893. 


1694. 


1895. 


50 to 60 


7.8pr.et. 


7.2pr.ct. 


8.5pr.ot. 


8.9 pr.ct. 


8.9 pr.ct. 


8.6pr.ct. 


60 to 70 


6.9 " 


8.8 " 


8.2 " 


9.7 " 


10.0 " 


10.8 ** 


10.8 '' 


70 to 80 


7.3 " 


8.4 " 


8.8 '* 


9.9 '' 


8.9 " 


9.8 *' 


9.8 '• 


80 to 90 


4.6 '' 


5.4 " 


5.1 *' 


5.9 '' 


4.8 " 


5.0 " 


5.3 '* 



1896. 



COLORED DECEDENTS. 

There were 209 deaths of persons of color during 1896. 
The towns from which they were returned, and number in each, were 
as follows: 

Providence City 122 

Newport City 81 

Cranston (State Institutions) 11 

East Providence 10 

Bristol 7 

South Kingstown 7 

Central Falls 5 

Westerly 4 

East Greenwich 8 

Warwick 2 

Tiverton 2 

Johnston 2 

Pawtucket 1 

Exeter 1 

Narragansett ; 1 

Total 209 

/Season.— The deaths in the different months were as follows: 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



166 



FORTY-FOURTH REGISTRATION REPORT. 



[1896. 



Months. Deaths. 

January 16 

February 13 

March 28 



Months. 
April.... 
May 



Deaths. 

28 

17 



June 20 



Months. Deaths. 

July 20 

August 20 

September 13 



Months. Deaths. 

October 10 

November 17 

December 14 



First Quarter 52 Second Quarter . . 68 , Third Quarter .... 53 Fourth Quarter. . 41 

I 

First six months, 115, Second six month, 01. Total, 200. 

The foHowing sammary will show the proportion, to the whole colored 
popolatioD, of each of the events of birth, marriage and death of colored 
persons, during the nineteen* years from 1878 to 1896, inclusive : 



1878. 
1879. 
1880 
1881 



1884 
1886 
1886 
1887 
1888 



1890 
1801 
1892 
1898. 
1894 
1895 



One Birth 
in every 

....86.4 

....39.6 



One Person 
man'ied in every 



.51.4. 



One Death 
in every 

40.2 

87.3 



47.1 


48.3 * 


34.3 


89.2 


86.8 


44.5 ' 


88.4 


68.8 


34.8 


46.0 


> 86.7 


51.7 


5 34.6 


48.2 


85.8 


88.9 ' 


\ 87.6 


55.0 


38.7 


52.0 


45.3 


57.6 ' 


42.8 


41.2 


» 40.6 


88.5 


\ 88.6 


44.2 


{ >.34.3 


56.6 


) 35.9 


42.6 


) 85.1 


38.9 



44.0 
35.4 
45.4 
89. 7 
84.5 
40.1 
37.8 
87.2 
88.0 
40.0 



86.4 
31.8 
81.8 
84.2 

1 
87.9 



In every one thousand of the colored population there were, in 1896 : 



Of Births. 
28.51.... 



Of Persons Married. 
25.7 , 



Of Deaths. 
28.4 



The following exhibit will show the number of living births, mar- 
riages and deaths among the colored population of Rhode Island, dur- 
ing ten years, from 1861 to 1870, inclusive; 10 years, from 1871 to 
1880, inclusive; 10 years, from 1881 to 1890, inclusive; and for 1891, 
1892, 1893, 1894, 1895 and 1896, and the aggregate of the same : 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



1896.] DEATHS. 167 

10 years, 1861-1870 1,181 births 557 marriages 1,153 deaths. 

10 years, 1871-1880 1,615 births 705 marriages 1,578 deaths. 

10 years, 1881-1890 1,964 births 752marrlage8 1,860 deaths. 

1891 ITBblrths 95marriage8 ;.. 204 deaths. 

1892 182 births 98 marriages 236 deaths. 

1893 208births 90 marriages 250 deaths. 

1894 221 births 67 marriages 222 deaths. 

1895 221 births 98 marriages 247 deaths- 

1896 226 births 102 marriages 209 deaths. 

Total 36 years 5,926 births 2,559 marriages 5,954 deaths. 

During ibe fiibt ten years (1861-1870) there were 22 more deaths 
than births ; during tlie second ten (1871-1880) 42 more births than 
deaths; during the last ten years (1881-1890) 94 more births than 
deaths. During 1891 the number of births was 31 less than the num- 
ber of deaths. During 1892 the number of births was 54 less than the 
number of deaths. In 1893 the number of births was 47 less than the 
number of deaths. In 1894 the number of births was 1 less than the 
number of deaths. In 1895 the number of births was 26 less than 
the number of deaths, and in 1896 the number of births was 17 more 
than the number of deaths. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



170 



FORTY-FOURTH REGISTRATION REPORT. 



[1896. 



I 



5S 



■s 






I 



-§ 
s 

s 
s 



I 



.t 



at b, 

O 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



1896.] 



DEATHS. 



171 



SI 



* « S 



Ǥ2 

« .3 08 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



CAUSES OF DEATH, 1896. 



The statistics of the causes of death in Rhode Island, in 1896, may 
be found in Tables VII, VIII, IX and X. The whole number of 
deaths, as previously stated, was 7,504, which was 31 less than the 
number returned in 1895, and 844 more than the number reported in 
1894. The number of which the cause of death was reported was 
7,475, and the number of which the cause was not stated was 29. 

The following Table shows the number of deaths in 1896, in each 
large division of the State, and the number and proportion in each 
division from which causes were reported unknown : 

Table LVII. 



35 
1§ 



- k,« I 



Mo |o5 >oo 



a 
o . 

^^ 
.9« 

is 



550 



5>» 



M 


i1 


5 


OQ 


a 


« 


8 




^ 


Pf 



Number of Deaths 220 



Cause not stated. 



1 



152 1,358 : 382 : 327 : 380 , 616 2,957 | 529 



r,504 



One In 1 117 

' I 



19 



156 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



174 



FORTY-FOURTH REGISTRATION REPORT. 



[1896. 



Table LVIII. 

Proportion of Deaths reported with " Causes Unknown " in eaxih 

Division of the State, for a period of forty-one years, 

from 1856 to 1896, inclusive. 



YEARS. 



1856-1860, One in every. 
1861-1865, One in every. 
1866-1870, One in every. . 
1871-1875, One in every. 



1876, One in every 

1877, One in every. ..... 

1878, One in every 

1879, One in every 

1880, One in every 

1876-1880, One in every. 



1881, One in every 

1882, One in every 

1888, One In every 

1881, One in every 

1885, One in every 

1881-1885, One in every. 



1886, One in every 

1887, One In every 

1888, One in every 

1889, One in every 

1890, One in every 

1886-1890, One in every. 



1891, One in every 

1892, One in every 

1898, One in every 

1894, One in every 

1895, One In every 

1891-1895, One in every. 



State Divisions. 



or? 



181 






5.0 



82.1 13.1 

83.9 8.0 

88.6 8.6 

11.5 7.9 
201.0 17.7 

32.1 7.4 

16.6 9.2 
21.9 23.5 
81.9 17.2 

204.0 18.0 

87.H ; 11.6 

40.4 15.9 

100.0 40.0 

185.0 355.0 
75.4 



^5 



16.1 



13.1 

1H.5 
9.7 
9.0 
12.4 
18.5 
19.9 

11.2 
10.9 
15.0 
81.6 
137.0 



20.1 



I 

I 
110.5 ! 192.5 

I 
212.0 343.0 

251.0 408.0 

208.0 I 152.0 

I 



1K.8 

86.0 

73.5 

152.7 

221.0 

236.0 



1896, One in every ^. ._^.j_. .... 

* Not including Providence City. 



576.0 413.0 I 125.1 

I I 



' 598.0 

I 
591.0 

228.0 96.3 ' 64.2 

192.3 173.0 

.522.0 122.7 



1,155.0 277.5 I 159.6 



■ 116.6 ' 



c k! a 

^5 



5.5 80.7 

7.9 39.8 

7.1 , 61.8 

I 

9.9 > 88.4 



So 



23.7 
16.4 
13.6 



9.9 124.3 22.8 



11.9! 



).0 



18.7 124.2 
9.5 225.1 
10.5 I 122.3 
18.1 I 39,6 



7.3 ' 148.0 
10.6 ' 187.0 



15.3 
91.7 
45.6 
15.7 

87.0 
782.6 
164.3 
176.7 
109.0 



154.8 



392.8 
372.1 
309.1 



16.0 
21.7 
8.6 

17.8 



26.9 

6.5 
7.7 
17.0 
94.0 
52.2 



242.2 14.0 



195.1 
264.0 



55.2 
351.0 



293.8 , 368.0 
120.0 j 388.0 
190.0 159.0 



18.9 171.2 



159.0 175.0 154.0 194.0 
240.0 212,0 184.0 264.0 



9.4 



loe.f 



16.1 I 66.0 



I 



14.1 



70.9 



I 



17.1 i 58.4 



I 



19.3 
28.2 
21.1 
17.6 
20.7 



14.4 
18.8 
28.4 
122.4 
91.8 



28.6 

113.7 
3837 
235.7 
160.0 
161.0 



177.6 



70.2 

91.6 

280.6 



224.0 .307.0 



144.9 
90.9 



126.5 151.8 



402.0 
123.7 



109.9 
130.2 
144.9 



195.2 152.5 



07.5 155.6 382.0 258.8 



45.8 
43.1 
47.4 
56.8 
48.8 

69.4 
53.2 
36.2 
8.2 
10.9 
34.0 

7.8 

8.0 
4.S 

6.2 
6.2 

5.1 
8.8 
9.1 

7.7 
6.9 

3.9 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



1896.] 



CAUSES OF DEATH. 



175 



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Digitized by VjOOQIC 



176 FORTY-FOURTH REGISTRATION REPORT. [1896. 

The number of deaths from coDSumptioD, in 1896, was 7 more than 
in 1895, an increase of only .83 per cent. 

From pneumonia there was a decrease of 17 deaths from that of the 
previous year, or about 2^ per cent. The fatality from pneumonia has 
been slowly increasing in proportion to whole number of deaths, for the 
last twenty years. 

From diseases of the heart there was an increase of 21 deaths over 
1895. For 16 years and more, diseases of the heart have been steadily 
increasing as causes of death, the mortality in 1896 being the largest 
ever recorded in this State. 

There were 283 deaths from diphtheria in 1896, a decrease of 57 
from the number in 1895. 

From kidney diseases there was an increase of 54, or nearly 16 per 
cent., over the number in 1895. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



1896.] CAUSES OF DEATH. 177 



C( )MP ARATI \ E STATISTICS 



COMMENTS. 



There have been presented in the preceding pages, numerically and 
in tabular form, the different causes of death in Rhode Island, in 1896, 
with various summaries and illustrations. In Tables VII and VIII 
they were presented at considerable length, in various specific terms ; 
in Table IX more or less grouped in a general nosological arrangement ; 
and in Table X the same for a period of forty-four years. 

In Table VII the number of deaths from each cause and of each sex 
is shown, for each month in the year, and the nativity and parentage of 
the decedents from each cause during the year. 

In Table VIII the number of decedents of each sex from ea^h cause ^ 
in the different periods of life, is given. 

In Table IX, with the classification and percentage of causes of 
death, the number of each general cause, in each division of larger 
population, is given. 

In Table X a nosological summary of causes of death for the whole 
State, in each of forty-four years, is given. 

Table LX is a compend in part of Tables VII, VIII and IX, pre- 
viously alluded to, and contains the particulars of the most important 
causes of death in 1896, and comprises the principal causes which will 
be commented upon in the following pages : 



23 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



178 



FORTY-FOURTH REGISTRATION REPORT. 





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1896.] 



CAUSES OF DEATH. 



179 



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Digitized by VjOOQIC 



180 FOUTY-FOUUTH REGISTRATION REPORT. [1896. 

DEATHS FROM ACCIDENTS. 

The number of deaths from accidental causes of all kinds, reported 
in Rhode Island in 1896, was 296. This number is but 3 more than 
in 1895. 

Among the 296 deaths from accidents there were 24 from asphyxia ; 
2 were the results of bicycle collisions (in one case a collision of two 
bicycles, in the other, bicycle ran into team) ; 1 from blasting rock ; 7 
from two boiler explosions ; 25 from burns and scalds ; 39 by drown- 
ing ; 6 by electric car (5 were struck by cars while walking on or cross- 
ing tracks, and one was a conductor who was struck by a passing car ; 
of the 5, 2 were children) ; 4 from exposure to cold and storm (1 male 
10 years, 1 female 22 years, 1 female 32 years, 1 female 64 years) ; 
48 from falls; 2 from firearms (a sportsman, gunning, and a lad 13 
years, shot by companion with a revolver); 47 from insolation; 7 by 
machinery, including two elevator accidents ; 4 from overdoses of med- 
icine ; 8 by poison ; 36 by railroad ; 3 from surgical operation ; 33 by 
various other accidents. 

Among these groups of causes there were, in detail^ causes as fol- 
lows: 

Asphyxia. — At birth, 7 ; by bedclothing, 4 ; by overlaying, 2 ; in 
burning building, 4 ; by caving of sewer, 1 ; by cesspool gas, 1 ; by 
illuminating gas, 2 ; by nitrous oxide gas (84 years, taken during ex- 
traction of teeth), 1 ; smothered between chest and wall (supposed to 
have fallen there while intoxicated), 1 ; by swallowing a bone, 1. Total 
24, or 8.1 per cent, of whole number of accidents. 

Burns and Scalds — By bonfire (child), 1 ; in burning house, 2; by 
clothes taking fire from lamp or stove (ages 2, 4, 73, 77, and 83 
years), 5 ; by falling on stove in epileptic fit, i ; by falling into hot 
water (children), 3 ; by upset kettle of hot water (1 year and 90 years), 
2 ; from playing with matches, 3 ; while fighting brush fire (72 years), 
1 ; by steam from boiler out of which tube had been blown, 1 ; manner 
unspecified, 6. Total 25, or 8.4 per cent, of whole number of acci- 
dents. 

Drowning, — Bathing, 6 ; fell from boat or ship, 6 ; from bridge, 1 ; 
from wharf, 3 ; fell into pond while playing, 1 ; fell into well (2 years 
and 45 years), 2; in baby carriage which rolled over bank into pond, 
1 ; playing on ice which broke through, 7 ; wading, went beyond depth, 
1 ; manner unknown, 11. Total 39, or 13.2 per cent, of whole num- 
ber of accidents. 

Falls — From aloft on vessel, 1 ; from bed (infant), 1 ; from bridge, 
1 ; from building or staging, 4 ; from high chair, 1 ; downstairs (ages 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



1896.J CAUSES OV DEATH. 181 

1, 20-30; 1, 30-40; 2, 40-50; 3, 60-70; 2, 70-80; 3, 80-90; 2 over 
90), 14; from electric car, 2; down park bank, 1 ; on floor (old peo- 
ple), 4; on ice, 3; from piazza, 1 ; from plank while at play, 1 ; on 
sidewalk, 2 ; over stair railing, 1 ; from tree, 1 ; from window (ages 
3, 4, 17, 20, 30, 51), 6; unspecified, 4. Total 48, or 16.2 per cent, 
of whole number of accidents. 

Insolation — There were 47 deaths due, to the unusually long period 
of extreme heat during July and August (minimum temperature in 
July was 70, maximum, 94 ; minimum temperature in August, 67, max- 
imum, 98). These included 2 blacksmiths, 1 carpenter, 1 farmer, 1 
gilder, 1 grocer, 17 laborers, 2 mill operatives, 1 painter, I paver, 1 
shoemaker, 2 teamsters, 7 females (60 years and over), and 10 under 
20 years with no occupation. The deaths from insolation were 15.9 
per cent, of the whole number of accidents. 

Overdose of Medicine Recovering from a spree, chloral taken by 

patient, 1 ; severe cold, medicine containing morphine taken in excess, 
1 ; morphine administered to child ill with scarlet fever, by mistake, 1 ; 
oil of tansy taken to procure abortion, 1. 

Poison, —From illuminating gas, 2 ; by chewing matches, 1 ; from 
excessive use of cigarettes or tobacco, 2 ; by laudanum taken by mis- 
take while intoxicated, 1 ; by lead (painter), 1 ; " Paris Green (by 
mistake, poor eyesight), 1. 

Railroad — 18 were walking upon or lying beside tracks, and 5 steal- 
ing ride on train ; 10 were employees ; 2 were passengers who jumped 
or fell from train while in motion ; 1 person was killed at grade cross- 
ing. Of the 10 employees that were killed, 4 were struck by engine, 
2 fell from cars, 1 was struck by overhead bridge, 1 was coupling cars, 

1 was killed while trying to save a child which was playing on the 
track, and 1 getting on to a moving train. Total 36, or 12.2 per cent, 
of whole number of accidents. 

Surgical Operation. — Repair of cervix, septicaemia, 1 ; operation for 
tendon grafting, septicaemia, 1 ; tongue tied, clipping, hemorrhage, 1. 

Accidents Various. — Hit by a base-ball, 1 ; by blows and cuts (man- 
ner unknown, body found on beach), 1 ; crushed between cart and shed, 
1 ; jammed between cart and freight car, 1 ; cut foot (while chopping), 
1 ; electrical shock and burns, (from telephone wire which had been 
crossed with electric light wire, 2, father and son ; 1 lineman, 1 moulder 
who was handling a crane worked by electricity at engine works, and 

2 others, 1 a laborer, and 1 a boy, by contact with wires), 6 ; from 
heavy lifting, 1 ; gored by a bull, 1 ; hooked by a cow, 1 ; hit by a 
blacksmith's cutter, 1 ; struck by board in planing mill, 1 ; lightning. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



182 FORTY-FOUBTH REGISTRATION REPORT. [1896. 

1 ; crushed by rock (quarry accident, not by blasting), 1 ; motorman 
(killed in fight with drunken passenger), 1 ; run over by heavy teams 
(ages 1, 27, 28, 40, 47, 56 years), 6 ; slight injury to hand, septicaemia, 
1; thrown from carriage (runaway horses), 3 ; by starvation, 1 ; un- 
specified, 3. Total 33. 

Of the whole number of deaths by accidents, 226 were males and 
70 were females; 101 were of native and 195 of foreign parentage, or 
34.12 per cent, of native to 65.88 of foreign. 

Of the sexes the proportion was 76.35 per cent, of male decedents 
to 23.65 per cent, of female decedents. 

In regard to periods of life, the decedents from accidental causes 
were divided as follows : Under five years, 47 ; 5 and under 10, 17; 
between 10 and 20, 20; between 20 and 40, 94; between 40 and 60, 
61 ; over 60, 57. 

In regard to sectional divisions of the State, 6 of the deaths from 
accidental causes were in Bristol county ; 25 in Kent county ; 24 in 
Newport county; 224 in Providence county; and 17 in Washington 
county. 

The whole number of deaths from accidental causes, in 1896, in pro- 
portion to the whole number of deaths in the State, was about 39 in 
every one thousand. The number in proportion to the whole popula- 
tion was .75 in every one thousand. 

The number of deaths in each division of the year was as follows: 

First Quarter 67 Third Quarter ^^ 

Second Quarter 57 Fourth Quarter ® 

First half 124 Second half ^ '^ 

Whole year 296 

In the following Table may be found the number, sex, parentage 
and locality of mortality from accidents, for thirty-one years, ending 
December 31, 1896: 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



1896.] 



CAUSES OF DEATH. 



183 



Table LXI. 

Mortality in the State from Accidents, with the Percentage of the 

Whole Number of Deaths; Sex, Parentage, and Locality, 

for thirty-one years, from 1866 to 1896, inclusive, in 

three periods of five years each, and for 

each of the last sixteen years. 



YEARS. 



5 years, 186G- 
1870 



5 years, 1871- 
1875 



5 years, 1876- 
1880 



1881. 
1882.. 
1883. 
1884.. 
1886.. 



5 years, 1881- 
1885 



1886 . 
1887. 



5 years, 1886- 
1890 



1891.. 



1894.. 
1895.. 



5 years,1891- 
1895 



190 
206 
190 
216 
250 

1052 

233 
809 
264 
234 



ias3 



296 
Total, 31 yrs, 5244 



VARIETIES. 



107! !!i66 

"I 

18 52 
21, 

28: 47 

28j 52 

28 61 



121 260 



573,1198 



19 
17 
18 
31 
32 26 

117; 82 



14' 43 
21 71 

28 58 



37 as 



11 31 
43 123 



21 29 16 

33 60; 20 

25 25 14 

I 

20 8 



57 



2, 8, 36 



165 136 



48 .., 



86 



66 iro 

I 
8; 86, 24 



r05 218,217'.584 285 

1 I I I 



2.18 

2.97 

2.72 

3.09 
3.50 
2.83 
3.82 
3.20 



3.26 

I 
3.25 

3.24 

2.87 



4.10 : 146 
3.60 I 

3.29 789 



3.54 
4.18 
3.55 
3.27 
3.89 



329 3.( 

ii 
116 ;3.94 

ll 
1514 3.14 



1016 



,3985 



PARENT- 
AGE. 



70 
1259 



443 

101 
2097 



890 

195 
3147 



STATE DIVISIONS. 



pq W 



22 34 

26 46 

I7I 53 

I 

5^ 17 

5' 9 



24 



11 
11 
6 
2 14 

7 17 

84 j 59 

5 18 

8 13 
9| 21 
e! 24 
6| 23 



34 99 

I 

6 25 
163 375 



58 



404 



306 

C2 
81 
70 
73 
75 

361 

95 
100 
75 

88 
85 

443 

85 
1760 



89 

48 

31 

5 
9 
3 
18 
83 13 

861 48 



595 

139 17 
2221821 



♦ Exclusive of Providence city. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



184 



FORTY-FOURTH REGISTRATION REPORT. 



[1896. 



Table LXII. 

Mortality in the State front AlcoJiolism, ivith the Percentage of the 

Whole Number of Deaths, Sex, Parentage and Locality for 

thirty-one years, from 1866 to 1806, inclusive. 



YEARS. 



g 




' S.X. ! 


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5 years, 1866-lH7o! 62 .40 : 



5 years, 1871-18751 93 .45 



5 years, 1H70-1880. 79 



1881. 
1882. 
1888. 
1884. 
1885. 



24 I 
28 

29 I 



.85 

.51 
.58 
.54 



27 I .63 
22 ! .41 



1881-1885 ' 130 ; 



.50 



1886. 
1887. 
1888. 
1889. 
1890. 



12 .20 

16 I .25 

10 I .82 

81 ..50 

25 .37 



53 



78 



52 



10 

i 19 
16 



1886-1890 



1891. 
1892 



18M. 
1895. 



1891-1895 172 



1896 

Total, 31 years. . 



.48 



84 ] .45 
670 I .43 



20 



82 



87 



25 



85 


45 


9 


3 


14 


2 


10 


6 


23 


8 


20 


5 



10 



100 


.81 


70 


24 1 


29 


.47 




7 


36 1 


.48 


' 27 


9 


44' 


.59 


1 34 


10 


39 ' 


.54 


33 


6 


24i 


.82 


19 


5 



135 . 


37 


28 , 


6 


502 


168 1 



216 



80 



56 



GO 



27 

454 



DIVISIONS OF THE STATE. 



I 



19 
20 
22 
17 
16 

94 

10 I] 

1- I' 

11 . 

19 I' 

17 I 





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7 


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32 



56 



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10 
209 



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14 




11 


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13 





14 j 1 
.^6 I 24 



* Exclusive of Providence City. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



1896.] CAUSES OF DEATH. 185 

APOPLEXY AND PARALYSIS. 

There were 419 deaths from apoplexy and paralysis in Rhode Island, 
in 1896, according to the returns. The number reported is 2 more 
than in the year 1895. 

The whole number of deaths from these two causes represents 5.58 
per cent, of all causes, and a proportion of 1.05 to every one thousand 
of the population. 

Of the sexes, there were 199 males and 220 females. 

Of parentage, 235 were of native parentage, and 184 of foreign. 

As observed in previous reports, the older native population has 
steadily been, in a very large proportion, more prone to apoplexy than 
the foreign, or the children of the foreign population. 

It will be observed that the proportion of deaths from apoplexy and 
paralysis, to the whole mortality from all causes, has steadily increased 
from about three and three-quarters per cent., during the first quinquen- 
nial (1866-1870), to nearly five and three-quarters per cent, during the 
quinquennial 1891-1895. 

The following Table will present the sex, parental and local relations 
of apoplexy and paralysis, as causes of death, during the last thirty- 
one years : (Providence city not included in the Providence county 
statement.) 



23 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



186 



FORTY-FOURTH REGISTRATION REPORT. 



[1896. 



Table LXIII. 

Mortality in the State from Apoplexy and Paralysis, 1866 to 1896, 



tnciusive. 



YEARS. 



1866-1870. 

1871 

1872 

1878 

1874 

1876 

1871-1875. 

1876 

1877 

1878 

1879 

1880 

1876-1880. 

1881 

1882 

1888 

1884 

1885 

1881-1885. 






is 

SSoD 



15,891 

8,814 
4,24' 
4.408 

4,1 
4,817 



574 

156 
125 
134 
166 
166 



20,540 

4,116 
4,450 
4,441 
4,472 
4,829 



1887. 



1890 

1886-1890, 



1891. 



1894. 



1891-1895. 



20,808 

5,016 
5,074 
5,282 

5,141 
5,889 
25,902 1,871 

5.849 



787 

165 
181 
188 
220 
215 



6,840 
6,594 
6,259 
6,984 



867 



841 



81,976, 1,( 



7,896 
7,440 
7,160 
7,535 



407 
445 
417 



36, 151 1 1.966 
7,504 419 






8.78! 

4.66 I 

2.97 

8.04 

8.69 

8.61 



8.59 

4.01 
4.07 
4.28 

4.92 
4.67 



4.77 

4.86 
5.22 
5.22 
5.80 
5.88 



5.29 

5.70 
5.17 
5.41 
5.17 
4.91 
5.29 

5.08 
4.29 
5.47 
6.22 
5.58 
5.71 

5.58 



:i 



., PA RENTAGE. 



284 ' 290 



78 
62 
59 
84 
79 



I 464 
118 



I 

i 

! 96 

75 ! 109 

72 , 180 

87 il 188 



857 880 



79 

87 
104 
114 
109 
498 

116 
189 ! 

188 \ 
185 I 
144 ' 



86 
94 
84 
106 
106 
476 

128 
126 
187 
168 
145 



571 

180 
128 
145 
146 

157 
701 

170 
168 
192 
176 

188 



672 


699 


178 


160 


161 


167 


164 


203 


140 


183 


168 


178 


806 


886 


160 


175 


176 


186 


806 


201 


231 


214 


199 


218 



889 

280 
218 

284 
204 
206 



972 



199 



994 
220 



1,087 

207 
195 
227 



1,110 
235 



I 
I 



110 
48 



166 

85 

58 
48 
74 

58 
268 

74 
97 
88 
122 
106 



108 
115 
188 
119 
185 



605 

128 
167 
180 
202 
179 



856 
184 



DIVISIONS OF THE STATE. 




* Not includiug Providence city. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



1896.] 



CAUSES OP DEATH. 



187 



Table LXIV. 

Ages of Decedents from Apoplexy and Paralysis, in each of the 
last thirty -one years. 



apoplexy and paralysis. 



1866.. 
1867.. 
1868.. 
1869.. 
1870.. 
1871.. 
1872. . 
1873.. 
1874.. 
1875,. 
1876.. 
1877.. 
1878.. 
1879.. 
1880.. 
1881.. 
1882.. 
1888.. 
1884.. 
1885.. 
1886.. 
1887.. 
1888.. 
1889.. 
1890.. 
1891.. 
1892.. 
1898.. 
1894.. 
1895.. 
1896.. 

Total 





_^ 


'" 


Pbric 


DS OF 


LIFE. 


1 




s 


2 


s 

2 


O 


1 


1 


7 


16 


9 


24 


2 




6 


6 


15 


38 


2 


3 


8 


11 


16 


27 


1 


1 


5 


12 


20 


28 


4 


1 


10 


9 


12 


33 


8 


4 


7 


14 


21 


46 


1 


4 


6 


17 


20 


26 


2 


8 


4 


14 


22 


35 


1 


2 


9 


9 


80 


39 


6 


2 


8 


19 


23 


40 


4 


4 


4 


18 


25 


48 


1 


2 


9 


12 


24 


50 


4 


2 


7 


14 


41 


40 


4 


6 


11 


18 


27 


57 


1 


2 


8 


18 


21 


59 


1 


7 


11 


20 


36 


55 


4 


5 


14 


28 


41 


57 


8 


4 


11 


19 


45 


56 


10 


7 


16 


21 


32 


68 


8 


5 


7 


25 


29 


76 


7 


8 


10 


25 


52 


65 


12 


6 


18 


26 


50 


90 


10 


4 


18 


29 


61 


85 


6 


6 


11 


86 


45 


87 


7 


5 


18 


29 


52 


84 


4 


6 


15 


24 


61 


88 


8 


6 


17 


40 


60 


91 


18 


6 


19 


45 


62 


110 


12 


5 


16 


39 


88 


108 


6 


2 


24 


39 


76 


101 


1 


7 


17 


84 


76 


118 


149 


126 


335 


681 


1,192 


1,924 



o 



45 


15 


41 


11 


87 


16 


40 


25 


45 


22 


49 


23 


61 


22 


58 


26 


59 


38 


70 


34 


70 


42 


77 


88 


83 


49 


05 


45 


94 


44 


112 


51 


96 


85 


100 


60 


92 


89 


100 


50 


90 


47 


95 


49 


108 


43 


111 


65 


106 


63 


110 


55 


2,212 


1,082 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



188 FORTY-FOURTH REGISTRATION REPORT. [1896. 

APPENDICITIS. 

From a greater perfection in diagnosis of disease of the abdominal 
viscera, the disease known as appendicitis has received greater atten- 
tion. This was probably reported in previous years under the head of 
diseases of the bowels, intussusception, or peritonitis- 

During 1896 there were 29 cases of appendicitis reported, and of this 
number operations were performed in 14 cases. 

As there were 23 deaths from peritonitis in 1896, this would repre- 
sent over 55 per cent, of the combined numbers. 

Of the 29 cases of appendicitis 16 were males, and 13 were females. 

Nine were of native and 20 of foreign parentage. 

BRAIN DISEASES. 

The number of decedents from diseases of the brain proper, in 1896, 
was 299. 

This number represents 3 98 per cent, of all causes, and a proportion 
of .76 to every one thousand of the whole population. 

Of the 299 decedents 152 were males, and 147 were females. 

In regard to parentage, 136 were of native, and 163 of foreign pa- 
rentage. 

The deaths in the different seasons of the year were as follows : 

First Quarter 68 Third Quarter 88 

Second Quarter 87 Fourth Quarter 56 

First half 166 Second half 144 

Whole year 299 

Brain diseases occur largely in children. Of the 299 decedents from 
those causes, is 1896, 141 were under 5 years of age, and 14 were from 
5 to 10 years of age. 

The following Table will present the statistics of mortality from dis- 
eases of the brain, for thirty-one years : 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



1896.] 



CAUSES OF DEATH. 



189 



Table LXV. 

Mortality in the State from Brain Diseases, with the Percentage, 

Sex, Parentage, and Locality, for thirty-one years, 

from 1866 to 1896, inclusive. 





1 1 




sje: 

i 


5. 

J 

i 1 
rt ; 

216 

276 

58 
72 
67 
81 

77 


FA REN 

i 
1 

274 

858 

89 
91 
76 

88 
89 


TAGE. 

1 

191 

249 

61 
69 
66 
75 
75 




DITI8IUNS OF THE 


STATE 




years. 


o ^ 


24 

32 

11 
7 
18 
18 
6 


M 

89 

7 
11 
12 
15 
12 


P 


8 

f 




1866-1870 

1871-1875 

Ig76 


465 

007 

150 
160 
142 
163 
164 


3.02 

2.95 

8.64 
8.59 
8.19 
3.65 
3.89 


249 
831 

92 

88 
75 

82 
87 


21 

12 

8 
8 
1 
8 
8 


139 

167 

89 
49 
45 
51 
56 


222 

887 

86 
85 
68 
75 
81 


25 

20 

6 


18n 


5 


1878 


8 


1879 


6 


1880 


6 


1876-1880 

1881 


779 

186 
181 
187 
148 
189 


3.49 

8.69 
8.50 
8.54 
2.88 
8.51 


424 

108 
98 
96 
90 
98 


855 

88 
88 
91 
58 
91 


433 

85 
92 

100 
77 
94 


346 

101 
89 
87 
71 
95 


18 

7 
4 
8 
4 
2 


50 

11 
10 
14 
9 
11 


57 

14 
10 
15 
8 
20 


240 

58 
71 
52 
41 
58 


894 

91 
80 
94 
88 
100 


25 
6 


1882 


6 


1888 


4 


1884 


8 


1885 


8 






1881-1885 

1886 


891 

182 
208 
212 

189 
217 


8.44 

8.09 
8.21 

8;21 

8.58 
3.18 


480 

108 
120 
114 
91 
113 


411 

74 
88 
98 
98 
104 


448 

84 
103 
109 

96 
119 


443 

98 
100 
108 
98 
98 


25 

4 
8 
4 
5 

7 


55 

14 
9 
19 
12 
18 


67 

18 
14 
12 
17 
17 


275 

69 
76 
76 
72 
90 


448 

78 
96 
90 

78 
85 


21 
4 


1887 


2 


1888 


11 


1889 


5 


1890 


5 






1886-1890 

1891... 


1,003 

222 
246 
257 
221 
268 


8.14 

8.86 
8.38 
3.46 
8.09 
8.42 


546 

185 
130 
139 
122 
128 


457 

87 
116 
118 

99 
185 


511 

108 
122 
116 
93 
186 


492 

114 
124 
141 
128 
182 


28 

8 
8 

12 
4 

14 


67 

19 
22 
17 
24 
25 


73 

19 
27 
28 
18 
22 


882 

98 
96 
100 
82 
81 


426 

78 
88 
98 
84 
105 


27 
6 


1892 


10 


1898 


7 


1894 


14 


1895 


11 






1891-1895 

1896 


1,204 

299 
5,248 


8.88 

8.98 
8.27 


649 

152 
2,881 


555 

147 
2,417 


1 565 

186 
2,725 


689 

168 
2,528 


46 

10 
165 


107 

24 
359 


104 

88 
412 


452 

189 
1,794 


448 

79 
2,864 


47 
9 


Total, 31 years. 


174 


^Excloslye 


of Pre 


>yidenc 


e city. 





















Digitized by VjOOQIC 



190 FORTY-FOURTH REGISTRATION REPORT. [1896. 

BRONCHITIS. 

The namber of decedents in 1896, whose deaths were reported as 
having been caused by bronchitis, was 276. This is 2 more than in 
1895. 

This number represents 3.68 percent, of all causes^ and a proportion 
of .70 to every one thousand of the population. 

Of the 276 decedents 143 were males, and 133 were females ; or at 
the rate of 108 males to each 100 females. 

In relation to parentage, 101 were of native, and 175 of foreign pa- 
rentage. 

In regard to age, 181 of the decedents were under 5 years of age, 8 
were between 5 and 20 years, 6 between 20 and 40 years, 18 between 
40 and 60 years, and of the remaining 63 decedents above 60 years of 
age, there were 28 deaths from chronic bronchitis. 

During the first four months of the year the decedents from bronchi- 
tis numbered 137 ; during the last four months the number was 68. 

The very large increase in the proportionate mortality from bron- 
chitis, during the last twenty years, will scarcely fail to be noticed in 
Table LXVI. 

The following Table will show various facts in relation to the mor- 
tality from bronchitis, for thirty-one years : 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



1896.] 



CAUSES OF DEATH. 



191 



Table LXVI. 

Mortality in the State from Bronchitis, 

1896, inclusive. 



thirty-one years, 1866 to 





1 

o 

1 


u 


SEX. 


PABENTAOE. 


DIVISIONS OF THE STATE. 


years. 


1 


i 

•3 


i 
1 


o 


St 

•Si 


i 


1^ 

ll 




1' 


1^ 

II 


1866-1870 

1871 


99 

24 
25 
27 
89 
57 


.64 

.78 
.65 
.64 
.96 
1.89 


48 

10 
10 
12 
22 
82 


56 

14 
15 
15 
17 
25 


47 

11 
11 
11 
12 
29 


52 

IS 
14 
16 
27 
28 


1 
1 


4 

1 

1 


7 

1 
1 
1 


29 

5 
6 
7 
6 
21 


56 

17 
16 
16 
82 
88 


2 


1872 




1873 


1 


1874 






1 


1875 V 






1 


2 










1871-1875 

1876 


172 

57 
69 
80 
62 
91 


.84 

1.46 
1.62 
1.89 
1.47 
1.86 


66 

28 
82 
80 
81 
49 


86 

84 
87 
50 
81 
42 


74 

26 
85 
87 
81 
44 


96 

81 
34 
43 
81 

47 


1 

1 
1 
1 
1 


2 

2 

1 
2 
1 
6 


4 

1 
6 
5 
6 


45 

7 
22 
22 

21 
21 


116 

46 
44 
46 
84 
56 


4 
2 


1877 




1878 


1 


1879 




1880 


1 






1876-1880 

1881 


859 

84 
100 
111 
118 
168 


1.61 

.67 
1.27 
2.10 
2.29 
8.06 


166 

48 
89 
56 
68 
82 


194 

86 
61 
55 
60 
66 


178 

89 

47 
51 
40 
91 


186 

45 
58 
60 
76 

77 


4 

1 
8 
5 
6 
5 


12 

1 
2 
2 

8 


18 

2 

6 
8 
6 
18 


98 

25 
25 
42 
42 
71 


226 

63 
60 
67 
62 
76 


4 
2 


1888 


4 


1883 


2 


1884 




1885 








1881-1885 

1886 


581 

174 
176 
228 
260 
275 


2.24 

2.96 
2.77 
8.45 
4.20 
4.01 


283 

75 
90 
105 
128 
140 


296 

99 
66 
128 
182 
135 


266 

81 
60 
79 
90 
116 


318 

93 
116 
149 
170 
159 


20 

8 
8 
3 
4 
5 


6 

4 
6 
4 
8 
4 


82 

9 
19 
17 
16 
15 


205 

74 
68 
110 
109 
107 


806 

88 
84 
66 
110 
136 


6 
1 


1887 


1 


1888 


6 


1889 


11 


1890 


6 






1886-1890 

1891 


1,118 

247 
808 
815 
254 

274 


8.48 

3.74 

4.16 
4.24 
8.55 
8.64 


636 

108 
147 
164 
112 
138 


189 
161 
151 
142 
141 


426 

95 
117 
105 
82 
92 


667 

152 
191 
210 
172 
182 


16 

18 
5 
4 
4 

8 


26 

15 
15 
9 
15 
15 


76 

21 
21 
21 
11 
19 


468 

65 
180 
150 

98 
108 


608 

111 
180 
126 
120 
122 


25 
2 


1892 


7 


1898 


5 


1894 


8 


1895 


7 






1891-1895 

1896 


1,896 
276 


8.87 
8.68 


664 
148 


784 
188 


491 
101 


907 
175 


84 

! s 


69 
19 


98 
9 


566 
112 


609 
116 


27 
12 





♦ Exclusive of Providence city. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



192 FORTY-FOURTH REGISTRATION REPORT. [1896. 

CANCER. 

There were 226 decedents, in 1896, whose deaths were caused by 
cancer, according to the returns. The term cancer includes all the 
various kinds, and in whatever place located. 

This number represents 3.01 per cent, of all causes^ and a proportion 
of .57 to every one thousand of the population. 

The varieties of cancer, as reported, may be found in Tables VII and 
VIII, on pages 20, 21, 33 and 34. They are classed in Table IX as 
follows : Cancer in various localities, or cancer various, 32 ; cancer 
of abdomen. 18; of the breast, 47; of face, 15; of the liver, 20; of 
rectum, 9 ; of the stomach, 40 ; of the uterus, 45. 

In 1896 the deaths from cancer, in the several divisions of the year, 
were as follows: 

First Quarter 61 Third Quarter 55 

Second Quarter 53 Fourth Quarter 57 

First half 114 Second half 112 

Whole year 2-46 

Sex — Of the 226 decedents from cancer 61 were males, and 165 
were females ; or 27 males and 73 females in every 100. 

Parentage There were 117 of native parentage, and 109 of foreign. 

The following Table will show the facts of mortality from cancer, in 
relation to sex, parentage and locality, for thirty-one years : 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



1896.] 



CAUSES OF DEATH. 



193 



Table LXVII. 
Mortality in the State from Cancer, 1866 to 1896, inclusive. 



YEARS. 



5 years, 1866-1870 

1871 

1872. 

1878 

1874 

1875 , 

1871-1875. 



1876 

1877 

1878 

1879 

1880 

1876-1880. 



1881 , 

1882 

1883 

1884 

1885 

1881-1885. 



1886. 
1887. 
1888. 



1890 

1886-1890. 



1891. 
1892. 



1894 

1895 

1891-1895. 



1896. 



66 
95 
106 
87 
95 



449 

106 
185 
119 
125 
125 
610 

145 
132 
169 
156 
193 



795 

162 
159 
193 
189 
165 



2.13 

2.13 
2.46 
2.53 
2.13 
2.31 



2.18 

2.72 
3.17 
2.82 
2.96 
2.72 
2.73 

2.90 
2.75 
3.20 
3.05 
3.59 



3.07 

2.77 
2.50 
2.93 
3.03 
2.41 



868 2.71 



177 
181 
205 
214 
234 
1,011 



2.67 
2.45 
2.75 
2.99 
3.11 
2.79 



226 3.01 



143 

27 

29 



45 



178 

40 
40 
51 
39 



279 

48 
53 
54 
67 
74 
296 

61 



280 

41 
69 
61 
64 
71 
806 

79 
106 
81 
86 
80 



432 

105 
92 
118 
117 
141 
573 

120 
110 
126 
124 
109 
589 

129 
128 
151 
147 
160 
715 

165 



PAIIE^ 


fTAGE. 


1 


e 1 


269 


59 


47 


19 


66 


29 


76 


80 


67 


20 


62 


88 


318 


131 


72 


84 


87 


4S 


79 


40 


70 


55 


78 


52 


381 


229 


90 


55 


82 


50 


105 


64 


88 


1 
68 . 


114 


79 


479 


316 


75 


87 


96 


63 


128 


65 


104 


85 


92 


73 


495 


373 


104 


73 


103 


78 , 


124 


81 


121 


93 


106 


128 


558 


453 ! 


117 


109 



DIVISIONS OP THE STATE. 



19 



26 

6 

8 
9 
4 
14 

41 l" 

«l 
7 I 

6 ' 

13 

18 

47 



11 11 



55 



Ah 



127 

27 
37 
87 



155 

42 
43 
49 
41 

67 



242 

37 
49 

57 
57 
46 



246 

46 
57 
56 
75 
79 



12 



313 

81 



?3 



181 

25 
50 
44 
88 
49 



206 

58 
66 

48 



301 



361 

87 
80 



74 



411 



75 



419 



■» o 



20 

4 
4 
8 
3 
5 



24 

7 
13 
10 
7 
4 
41 

8 
8 
2 
4 
13 
35 

12 

7 
17 
28 

8 
67 



14 
10 
19 
19 
17 
79 

17 



♦ Exolusive of Providence city. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



194 FORTY-FOURTH REGISTRATION REPORT. [189^. 

CHILD-BIRTH. 

Under the head of ^^Child-birth" are indaded, in this coDnectlon, 
puerperal fever, puerperal convalsions, and whatever causes of deat\i 
that may have occurred as the direct result of child-birth, or parturi- 
tion. 

The number reported in 1896 was 50, 20 of which were from the 
immediate effects of child-birth, including metritis, hemorrhage, rapture 
of uterus, &c. ; 5 from peritonitis ; Id from puerperal convulsiatxs ; 10 
from puerperal fever or septicemia ; and 2 from unstated causes. 

Of the whole number 16 were of native, and 34 of foreign parent^age. 

This number represents .67 per cent, of all causes^ and a proportion 
of .13 to every one thousand of the population. 

There were 5 less deaths from ^^ child-birth " in 1896 than in X895. 

The following Table will present the various relations in regard to 
the mortality from child-birth, for thirty-one years, 1866-1896: 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



W 



1896.] 



causes of death. 
Table LXVIII. 



195 



Mortality in the State from Child-Birth, with the Percentage of the 

Whole Number of Deaths, Parentage, and Locality, for 

thirty-one years, from 1866 to 1896, inclusive. 



YEARS. 



1866-1870. 
1871-1875. 



1876 

1877 

1878 

1879 

1880 

1876-1880. 



1881. 



1884 

1885 , 

1881-1885. 



1886 
1887. 



1890 

1886-1890. 

1891 



1894 

1895 

1891-1895. 



Total, 31 years. 



CO 


1 


"53 

155 


i 


1.01 


345 


1.19 


48 


1.24 


46 


1.09 


43 


l.Ol 


43 


1.02 


51 


1.11 


231 


1.04 


60 


1.28 


50 


1.03 


58 


1.10 


47 


.91 


47 


.87 


262 


1.04 


41 


.70 


53 


.71 


51 


.77 


41 


.65 


41 


.58 


274 


.86 


32 


.35 


75 


1.01 


57 


.76 


72 


1.01 


55 


.73 


291 


.77 


50 


.67 


1,508 


.95 



PARENTAGE. 



62 
111 

21 

18 
23 
21 
29 



106 



18 



108 

17 
15 
13 
14 
12 



16 
586 



134 

27 
28 
20 
22 
28 
125 

84 



30 



154 

24 
38 
88 
27 



182 

24 
46 
34 
57 



200 



34 



DIVISIONS OF THE STATE. 






35 



Wo 



2 

116 



t^ 



«o 



18 






90 

24 
494 



r 



56 
110 



27 



111 

29 
27 

27 
18 
24 



125 

17 
26 
20 
13 
17 



117 

19 
29 



30 



139 

17 
675 



a 
o . 



11 

19 
3 



14 

4 

1 
2 

4 

1 



12 

1 



12 

2 
9 
4 
4 
4 



6 
97 



♦ Exclusive of Providence city. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



196 FORTY-FOURTH REGlSTRATlOK REl»OftT. [1896- 

CHOLERA INFANTUM. 

The number of deaths from cholera infaDtum, according to the re- 
turns for 1896, was 545. 

This number represents 7.26 per cent, of deaths from all causes^ and 
a proportion of 1.38 to every one thousand of the population. 

Of the 545 decedents 313 were males, and 232 were females. 

Of parentage, 165 were of native, and 380 of foreign parentage; or 
about 230 of foreign to every 100 of native parentage. 

The mortality from cholera infantum, during 1896, was .62 per cent, 
greater than during the year 1895. 

As may be seen on the following page, the number of decedents 
from cholera infantum, during the thirty-one years from 1866 to 1896, 
inclusive, was 10,172. 

The proportion to total mortality, for the period of thirty-one years, 
was 6.3 per cent. For 1891 the proportion was 8.2 per cent. ; for 
1892, 8.6 per cent. ; for 1893, 8.1 per cent. ; for 1894, 6.9 per cent.; 
for 1895, 6.6 per cent. ; and for 1896, 7.3 per cent. 

There were 111 males to every 100 females among the decedents 
during the thirty-one years ; and 157 decedents of foreign parentage 
to every 100 of native, during the same period. 

The following Table shows the whole number of reported deaths 
from cholera infantum ; the sex and parentage of the decedents ; and 
the number in each of the larger divisions of the State, in each of the 
last thirty-one years : 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



1896.] 



CAttSES 01^ DEATfi. 



19? 



Table LXIX. 
Mortality in the State from Cholera Infantum, 1866 to 1896, inclusive. 





1 

1 
B 


1 


SB 

'3 
1^ 


X. 

1 
'3 
B 


PAREN 

1 


TAGE. 




DIVISIONS OP. THE 


STATE. 




years. 


1 


to § 

«8 




Is 

p 




1 

F 


f 


5 years, 1866-1870 
1871 


745 

172 
391 
285 
265 
818 


4.84 

4.82 

8.71 
6.19 
5.86 
0.97 


403 

85 
195 
148 
140 
156 


342 

87 
196 
137 

162 


852 

82 
167 
165 
! 115 
. 155 
684 

105 
96 

i '' 

i '^^ 

109 

454 

102 

133 

1 104 
1 
139 

128 


393 

90 
224 
120 
150 
163 


39 

14 
16 
17 
4 
20 


44 

12 
16 
14 
12 
16 


46 

12 
21 
16 
5 
20 


245 

59 

157 
120 
84 
108 


324 

62 
151 

99 
134 
136 


47 
13 


1872 


30 


1873 


19 


1874 

1875 


26 

18 


1871-1875 

1876 


1,431 

250 
259 
168 
161 
247 


6.97 

5.75 
5.52 
3.58 
3.43 
5.12 


724 

131 
139 
96 
88 
123 


■ 707 
119 1 

72 ' 

73 , 
124 ' 


747 

145 
163 
95 
90 
138 


71 

5 
12 
7 
8 
13 


70 

12 
13 
14 
16 
11 


74 

29 
9 
7 
21 
10 


528 

68 
96 
64 
51 
98 


582 

124 
12^ 
71 
59 
100 


106 
12 


1877 


7 


1878 


5 


1879 


6 


1880 


20 






1876-1880 

1881 


1,085 

240 
325 
242 
325 
279 


4.86 

4.54 
6.10 
4.37 
6.00 
4.92 


577 

130 
173 
124 
177 
150 


508 

110 
152 
118 
148 
129 


631 

138 
192 
138 
180 
151 


45 

10 
20 
12 
10 
5 


66 

22 
11 
7 
12 
23 


76 

14 
19 
22 
26 
16 


372 

75 
132 

88 
114 
133 


476 

102 
130 
108 
144 
86 


50 
17 


1882 


18 


1888 


5 


1884 


19 


1885 


16 






1881-1885 

1886 


1,411 

877 
855 
467 
396 

582 


5.45 

6.14 
5.36 
6.78 
6.01 
8.01 


754 

179 
•200 
239 
209 
282 


657 

198 
155 
228 
187 
300 


606 

143 
145 
, 184 
132 
202 


805 

234 
210 
283 
264 
380 


57 

4 
16 
18 
18 
19 


75 

29 
16 
35 
82 
57 


97 

15 
35 
28 
20 
38 


542 

194 
160 
219 
199 
245 


570 

120 
119 
149 
116 
209 


70 
15 


1887 


9 


1888 


18 


1889 


11 


1890 


19 






1886-1890 

1891 


2,177 

546 
638 
603 
496 
500 


6.81 

8.25 
8.56 
8.10 
6.93 
6.64 


1,109 

298 
336 
324 
243 
268 


1,068 

248 \ 

297, 

279 

253 

282 


806 

170 
210 
1 186 
162 
155 


1,371 

376 
423 
417 
334 
345 


75 

21 
18 
11 
18 
14 


169 

68 
77 
82 
76 
57 


131 

50 
43 
44 
25 
19 


1,017 

255 

281 
267 
225 
241 


713 

137 
201 
183 
130 
150 


72 
15 


1892 


13 


1898 


16 


1894 


27 


1895 


19 






1891-1895 

1896 


2,778 

545 
10,172 


7.55 

7.26 
6.35 


1,469 

313 
5,849 


1,309 1 

282 

4,823 


883 

165 
8,950 


1.895 

880 
6,222 


77 

5 

1 869 


360 

62 
846 


181 

38 
643 


1,269 

277 
4,250 


801 

148 
3,614 


90 
15 


Total, 81 years. . 


450 



* Exclusive of Proyidence city. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



198 FORTY-POUBTH RBGlSTftATlON REPORT. [1896. 

CONSUMPTION. 

The decedents from consumption, during 1896, numbered 846. The 
number is 7 more than in the preceding year. 

This number represents 11.27 per cent, of aU caiLses, and a propor- 
tion of 2.1 to every one thousand of the population. 

Sex. — ^Of these 846 decedents 409 were males, and 437 were females ; 
being about 107 female decedents to every 100 male decedents. 

For the period of twenty years (1866-1885) there were nearly 124 
females to every 100 male decedents from consumption, and a very 
considerable excess every year since, excepting 1890, 1891 and 1893. 

Parentage, — There were 273 decedents of native parentage, and 573 
of foreign ; a proportion of 210 of foreign parentage to every 100 of 
native. 

Season, — Thie largest number of deaths in any one month, 89, oc- 
curred in December ; the next largest, 77, in April ; and the same in 
May ; the smallest number, 57, in Juiie. 

The number in each quarter of the year was as follows : 

First Quarter 201 Third Quarter 197 

Second Quarter 818 Fourth Quarter 227 

First half 482 Second half 434 

Whole number 846. 

Ages. — During 1896, of the 846 decedents from consumption, 269 
were between the ages of 20 and 30 ; and 204, or nearly one quarter, 
were between the ages of 30 and 40. 

In order to show more concisely the relation of age to mortality 
from consumption, during 1896, the following age periods and num- 
bers are presented : 

Under 10 years of age ; 41 

Between 10 and 20 years 110 

Between 20 and 80 years 269 

Between 80 and 40 years 204 

Between 40 and 60 years 87 

Between 50 and 70 years 105 

O ver 70 years 80 

Total : 846 

The following Table shows the total deaths from all reported known 
causes^ with the number and percentage of deaths from consumption of 
the same, in each of the large divisions of the State, and in the whole 
State, in each of the last seventeen years, and also the aggregate for a 
period of thirty years, from 1861 to 1890, inclusive : 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



CONSUMPTION. 



STA.TI8TIC8 BY COUNTIES. 



NUMBER AND PERCENTAGE, 



THIRTY-SIX YEARS. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



200 



POBTT-FOUBTH BEOISTRATION BEPOBT. 



[1896. 



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Digitized by VjOOQIC 



1896.] 



CAUSES OF DEATH. 



201 



ill 



o 



CO 



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rH 00 rH 



£- ^ «-• 



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315 
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Digitized by VjOOQIC 



202 



forty-fourth registration report. 
Table LXXI. 



[1896. 



Mortality in the State from Consumption^ with the Percentage of 

the Whole Number of Deaths^ from all Causes, and the 

Sex, Parentage and Locality in the Aggregate 

of Different Periods, 1806-1896, 



YEARS. 



Is 
3 

o 



1860-1870 

1871-1875 

1876-1880 

1881-1885 

1886 

1887 

1888 

1889 

1890 

1886-1890 

1891 

1892 

1898 

1894 

1895 

1891-1895 

1896 

Total, 81 years. 



2,718 

2,8 

3,271 

3,729 

826 
710 
800 
727 

852 



8,915 

740 
759 
722 
705 



3,765 

846 
21,127 





1 i 


1 

o 

2 


i 

i 1 

1 « 


i 

1 

1,474 


17.66 


1,244 


i4.as 


t 
1,267 


1,616 

1 


14.66 


1,485 


1,836 


14.40 


1,692 


2,037 


14.12 


882 


444 


11.19 


812 


398 


12.18 


391 


409 


11.61 


356 


371 


12.29 


422 


430 


12.24 


1,863 


2,052 


11.18 


380 


360 


10.26 


360 


899 


9.72 


864 


358 


9.85 


387 


868 


11.18 


392 


447 


10.41 


1,833 


1,982 


11.27 


409 


437 


18.25 


9,743 


11,384 



PAREMTAUE.I 



DIVISIONS or THE STATE. 



Yi 



1,567 
1,504 



1,151 
1,879 



1,478 


1,798 


1,427 


2,302 


808 


518 


266 


444 


284 


516 


239 


488 


280 


572 


1,877 


2,538 


248 


492 


249 


510 


230 


492 


214 


491 


284 


555 


1,225 


2,540 


273 


573 


8,846 


12,281 



122 
94 
104 
113 



122 

17 
29 
18 
10 



103 

27 
685 



231 
213 

194 

208 

43 
34 
55 
45 
88 



215 

47 
51 
55 
46 
54 



219 

163 

188 

242 

57 
41 
82 
37 
51 



218 

51 
45 
35 
46 
59 



253 

59 
1,873 



236 



891 

953 

1,(M8 

1,222 

276 
246 
273 
207 



1.357 

236 
265 
259 
242 

271 

1,273 



1.051 
1,234 
1,498 
1,761 



815 
894 

1,762 

347 
842 
328 
825 
394 

1,T36 

86T 



204 



226 



108 

50 
46 
50 
53 
88 

241 

42 
27 
27 
86 
82 

174 

85 
1,802 



CONSUMPTION. Proportion of Deaths to Population, 

The proportion of deaths from consumption to the population in *^^ 
different localities in the State, during the last eleven years, ao«y ^® 
seen in the following summaries : 

* Exoluaiye of Proyidence city. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



1896.] 



CAUSES Ol* DEAffl. 



203 



For five years^ 1886 to 1890, inclusive. 



Persons, 
One Death to every 

Bristol County 4 W or . 

Kent County 669 or. 

Newport County 708 or, 

Providence County* 598 or. 

Providence City 856 or 

Washington County 497 or 

Whole State 420 or 



In every 1,000 
of Population. 

2.09 

1.8» 

1.48 

1.91 

t.88 

2.10 

2.40 



For five years^ 1891 to 1895, inclusive. 



Persons, 
One Death to every 

Bristol County 671 or. 

Kent County 577 or, 

Newport County 647 or. 

Providence County* 587 or 

Providence City 418 or, 

Washington County 766 or, 

Whole State 497 or 



In every 1,000 
of Population. 

1.74 

1.78 

1.58 

1.91 

2.57 

1.84 

2.02 



1894. 

Persons, 
One Death to every 

Bristol County 1,218 

Kent County 632 

Newport County 667 



.or. 
.or. 
.or. 



In every 1,000 
of Population. 

82 

1.58 

1.50 



Providence County Towns 612 or 1 .68 

Pawtucket 499 or 2.00 

Providence City 438 or 2.98 

Woonsocket 522 or 1 .92 

Washington County 680 or 1.47 

Whole State 533 or 1 .88 



* Exclusive of Providence city. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



204 



POBTY-FOURTH REGISTRATION BEl>OBT. 



[1896. 



1895. 



PersoDS, 
One Death to every 

Bristol County 421 or. 

Kent County 556 or. 

Newport County 525 or. 

Providence County Towns 472 or. 

Central Palls 688 or. 

Pawtuckel 626 or, 

Providence City 869 or. 

Woonsocket 479 or 

Washington County 173 or, 

Whole State 459 or. 



In every 1,000 
of Population. 

2.87 

1.80 

1.90 

2.12 

1.45 

1.60 

2.71 

2.08 

1.29 

2.18 



1896. 



Persons, 
One Death to every 

Bristol County 466 or, 

Kent County 526 or, 

Newport County 474 or. 

Providence County Towns 457 or 

Central Falls 606 or. 

Pawtucket 613 or. 

Providence City 404 or, 

Woonsocket 455 or 

Washington County 718 or 

Whole State 466 or. 



In every 1,000 
of Population. 

2.19 

1.90 

2.11 

2.19 

1.65 

1.68 

2.47 

2.12 

1.40 

2.15 



There was only a very slight difference in the mortality from con- 
sumption, in 1896, as compared with the preceding year, not only in 
numbers, but also in proportion to the population. 



CROUP. 



There were 24 decedents from croup, in 1896, as against 30 in 1895. 

Sex Of the 24 decedents from croup, in 1896, there were 16 males 

and 8 females, a proportion of 200 males to each 100 females, which 
is in accordance with the rule of previous years, in which there has 
been a preponderance of males. 



Digitized by V^iOOQIC 



1896.] CAtrSES Ol* DEAM. ^^^ 

Parentage ^There were 5 decedents of native parentage, and 19 of 

foreign parentage. The proportions were in the ratio of 380 of for- 
eign to each 100 of native parentage. 

^^e. —There were 12 of the decedents under 1 year of age, 4 of I 
year and under 2, 7 of 2 years and under 5, and 1 between 5 and 10. 

Season. — 

First Quarter U Third Quarter 

g 
Second Quarter 8 Fourth Quarter — • 

First half 14 Second half ....-• 

Whole year 24 

The following Table will exhibit various facts in relation to mortal- 
ity from croup for thirty-one years : 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



206 forty-fourth registration report. [1896. 

Table LXXII. 

Mortality in the State from Croup^from 1866 to 1896, inclusive. 



TEARS. 



186ft-1870, 



1871-1875. 



1876 

1877 

1878 

1879 , 

1880 

1876-1880., 



1881. 
188S. 



1884 

1886 

1881-1885. 



1886 

1887 

1888 

1889 

1890 

1886-1890. 



1891. 



1898 

1894 

1895 

1891-1895. 



1896 

Total, 31 years. 



227 
867 

102 
96 
98 
96 
66 

452 

101 
77 
71 
60 
94 



428 

90 
113 
79 
80 



268 

24 

2,206 



1.47 

1.79 

2.61 
2.23 
2.20 
2.28 

1.45 
2.08 

2.16 
1.60 
1.40 
1.55 
1.74 
1.68 

1.53 
1.79 
1.19 
1.28 
1.19 
1.39 

1.46 

1.20 

.67 

.45 

.40 
.84 



I 112 

i 

, 196 

I 

! so 

i 48 

I "" 

' 58 
I 
82 



151 

16 
1,149 



115 
169 

52 

47 
48 
88 
34 
219 

50 
86 
89 

40 

49 > 

220 I 

I 
45 I 

55 I 
86| 
48j 
30 
209 

I 
27 I 

37 I 
21 
16 
16 

117 I 

8 I 
1,057 I 



PARSK 


TAOB. 


>- 

1 


1 


96 


181 


164 


203 


42 


60 


84 


61 


43 


50 


40 


56 


27 


39 


186 


266 


38 


63 


82 


45 


83 


38 


82 


48 


42 


52 


177 


246 


89 


51 


48 


70 


34 


45 


24 


56 


28 


55 


168 


277 


17 


50 


44 


45 


18 


37 


10 


22 


9 


21 


93 


175 


5 


19 


889 


1,317 



DIVISIONS OF THE STATE. 



81 



"Soc r c« 
«S 

6 

13 

1 
4 

14 
3 
3 



11 
10 
11 
7 
6 
45 

4 

207 



« O S ft 



p 



41 



150 



131 



20 



• 143 217 



171 178 



160 

27 
21 
25 
15 
11 



12 
798 



IS 



99 

169 

66 
40 
89 
43 
30 



49 



72 

8 
905 



a 
o . 

l§ 
sg 



8 
11 



2 

6 
5 
1 
2 
16 

1 
3 



66 



* Exclusive of Providence city. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



1896.] CAUSES OF DEATH. 207 

DIARKHCKA AND DYSENTERY. 

There were 89 decedents from diarrhoea and dysentery, in 1896. 
This number represents 1.18 per cent, of all causes, and a propor- 
tion of .23 to every 1,000 of the population. 

Sex. — Of the 89, 49 were males, and 40 were females, or a propor- 
tion of 122 males to every 100 females. 

Parentage — There were, of the 89 decedents, 40 of native parent- 
age, and 49 of foreign parentage, or a proportion of about 122 of 
foreign parentage to every 100 of native. 

Age There were 29 of the decedents from diarrhoea and dysentery 

under 5 years of age, and there were 42 over 50 years of age, leaving 
18 for all the 45 years between 5 and 50. 

Locality. — Of the 89 decedents 67 were in Providence county, and 
8 in Newport county. 2 were reported from Bristol county, 5 from 
Kent county, and 7 from Washington county. 

Reason.— Fifty-four of the deaths from diarrhoea and dysentery oc- 
curred during the months of July, August and September. 

The decrease in mortality from diarrhoea and dysentery, in 1896, 
compared with the previous year, was about 12 per cent. 

The following Table will show the deaths from diarrhoea and dysen- 
tery, with the percentage, sex, parentage, etc., for each of thirty-one 
years, beginning with 1866 : 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



208 



FORTY-FOURTH REGISTRATION REPORT. 



[1896. 



Table LXXIII. 

Mortality in the State from Diarrhoea and Dysentery, 1866 to 1896^ 

inclv^ive. 



TEARS. 



6year8.1866-1870. 
1871-18T6 



1876 

1877 

1878 

1879 

1880 

1876-1880. 



1881. 
1882. 



1884 

1886 

1881-1885. 



1886 

1887 

1888 

1889 

1890 

1886-1890. 



1891. 



1898 

1894 

1895 

1891-1895. 



1896 

Total, 81 years.. 



677 

680 

122 
142 
93 
97 

98 



B, I 



4.40 

2.60 

2.96 
8.19 
2.09 
2.17 

2. as 



652 2.47 



119 
168 
182 
168 
120 



2.87 
8.11 
8.46 
2.98 
2.28 



732 2.89 I 



159 
199 
167 
159 

182 



856 



2.72 
8.11 
2.81 
2.54 
2.62 
2.68 



148 2.16 
199 2.69 
159 ! 2.14 



124 
101 



726 

89 
4,212 



1.78 
1.84 



2.01 I 



1.18 



1 


1 


863 


324 


817 


268 


66 


56 


64 


78 


42 


61 


48 


49 


49 


49 


269 


288 


66 


68 


75 


88 


86 


96 


74 


79 


61 


59 


362 


880 


64 


95 


107 


92 


69 


88 


78 


86 


84 


98 


897 


«» 


69 


74 


100 


99 


79 


80 


61 


63 


38 


63 


347 


379 


49 


40 


2,084 


2,128 



PARENTAGE. 




DIVISIONS OF 


THE STATE. 




1 


1 
1 

I'- 


2| 


i 




p 


Is 

r 


P 


823 


864 


26 


46 


89 


215 


254 


47 


305 


275 


27 


46 


23 


183 


289 


12 


62 


70 


8 


6 


2 


41 


65 


5 


73 


69 


8 


6 


9 


54 


65 


10 


51 


42 


5 


8 


2 


34 


39 


5 


47 


50 


9 


6 


10 


27 


42 


3 


50 


48 


4 


6 


10 


32 


42 


4 


273 


279 ' 


29 


32 


33 


188 


248 


27 


64 


66 


2 


4 


8 


47 


57 


6 


69 


89 


2 


4 


28 


57 


64 


8 


88 


94 


7 


7 


16 


74 


75 


3 


69 


84 


10 


6 


11 


66 


56 


5 


61 


69 


7 


6 


6 


62 


85 


4 


331 


401 


28 


26 


64 


306 


287 


21 


70 


89 


7 


11 


1 


73 


5d 


8 


70 


129 


6 


16 


4 


92 


72 


9 


97 


60 


6 


8 


3 


54 


71 


15 


67 


92 


1 


12 


17 


71 


50 


8 


74 


108 


5 


9 


22 


77 


63 


6 


378 


478 


26 


56 


47 


367 


815 


46 


61 


92 


4 


15 


13 


48 


58 


5 


82 


117 


6 


14 


8 


76 


89 


6 


56 


103 


6 


14 


7 


60 


66 


7 


36 


88 




8 


4 


59 


43 


10 


40 


61 

461 


6 


9 


3 


41 


87 


5 


265 


21 


60 


35 


284 


293 


S3 


40 


49 


2 


5 


8 


39 


28 


7 


1,915 


2,297 


158 


271 


299 


1,582 


1,709 


198 



♦Exclusive of Providence city. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



1896.] CAUSES OF DEATH. 209 

DIPHTHERIA. 

The number of deaths from diphtheria, in 1896, was 283, which was 
57 less than in 1895, or a decrease of nearly 17 per cent. 

This number represents 3.77 per cent, of all causes, or a proportion 
of .72 to every one thousand of the population. 

Sex — Of the 283 decedents 149 were males, and 134 were females. 
As a rule there has been a considerable preponderance of females. 

Parentage. — There were 120 of native, and 163 of foreign parent- 
age, or a proportion of about 136 of foreign parentage to every 100 
of native. 

Season. — There were 93 deaths from diphtheria in the first quarter, 
74 in the second quarter, 38 in the third quarter, and 78 in the fourth 
quarter. 

Age, — There were 188 deaths under 5 years of age, 69 between 5 and 
10, 15 between 10 and 15, 3 between 15 and 20, and 8 above 20 years 
of age. 

Locality Of the 283 decedents 249 were in Providence county ; 5 

in Bristol county ; 19 in Kent county ; 6 in Newport county ; and 4 in 
Washington county. 

The following Table shows the mortality in the State from diphtheria 
for thirty-one years, beginning with 1866, also the percentage of deaths, 
the sex, parentage, etc. : 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



210 



FORTY-FOURTH REGISTRATION REPORT. 



[1896. 



Table LXXIV. 
Mortality in the State from Diphtheria — 1866-1896, 





OS 


1 




1 
8BX. ; 


PARBXTAOE.' 




DIVISIONS OP THE STATE. 






11 
If 


55 


1 
1 

1 

i 


1 


i 
. 1 


i 
1 


1 

^ i 






li 








Years. 


II 




It 


1. 
F 


It 


1866- '70 


15,891 


181 


1.18 


88 


98' 


108 


78 


5 


28 


80 


40 


44 


84 


1871-75 


20,540 


242 


1.18' 


118 


124 


154 


83 


4 


85 


20 


54 


105 


24 


1876.... 


4,116 


159 


8.86 


77 


82 

1 


69 


90 


1 


2 


9 


29 


111 


7 


1877.... 


4,460 


492 


11.56 


239 


258 


283 


269 


12 


44 


2 


122 


295 


17 


1878.... 


4,441 


486 


9.80 


224 


211 , 


201 


284 


21 


29 


28 


106 


245 


11 


1879. . . . 


4,472 


259 


6.79 1 


121 


188 : 


148 


116 


7 


19 


20 


96 


106 


12 


1880.... 


4,829 


162 


8.40 


78 


79 

763 

1 


76 


77 1 


8 


6 


2 


68 


61 


17 


1876- '80 


20,306 


1,497 


6.71 


734 


TUX 


776 


44 


100 


56 


415 


818 


64 


1881.... 


5,016 


216 


4.68' 

1 


106 


110 1 


118 


98 


10 


16 


8 


58 


116 


18 


1882.... 


5,074 


101 


1.99' 


48 


58 


56 


46 




8 


4 


29 


48 


17 


1883.... 


6,282 


95 


1.88' 


89 


56 ; 


46 


60 


1 


7 


3 


26 


54 


4 


1884..,. 


5,141 


119 


2.81 


65 


54 : 


47 


72 


8 


1 


9 


39 


58 


4 


1885.... 


5,889 


99 


1.83 


47 


62 


48 


51 


5 


5 


6 


39 


87 


7 


1881- '85 


25,902 


680 


2.48' 


805 


825 


813 


817 


24 


82 


30 


,86 


813 


45 


1886.... 


5,849 


228 


8.90 


98 


180 ; 


101 


127 


20 


21 


23 


64 


98 


2 


1887.... 


6,840 


287 


4.58 


135 


152 


101 


186 


15 


11 


4 


114 


108 


35 


1888.... 


6,594 


191 


2.86 


■ 87 


m! 


79 


112 


18 


3 


9 


58 


98 


10 


1889.... 


6.269 


184 


2.98 


; 80 


104 


89 


95 


3 


10 


11 


56 


97 


7 


1890.... 


6,984 


211 


3.04; 


112 


99 1 


93 


118 


1 


9 


16 


86 


94 


5 


1886- '90 


81,976 


1,101 


3.44 


|5>. 


589 


463 


638 


52 


64 


63 


378 


495 


59 


1891 .... 


6,620 


102 


1.50 


\ 52 


50 


48 


54 


2 


7 


6 


40 


47 




1892.... 


7,896 


89 


1.20 


^18 


41 


44 


45 


1 


1 


8 


23 


89 


17 


1893.... 


7,440 


157 


2.11 


75 


82 


57 


100 


1 


11 


13 


67 


65 




1894.... 


7,160 


133 


1.86 


74 


59 1 


61 


72 




8 


8 


72 


47 


3 


1895.... 


7,535 


840 


4.51 


166 
415 


174 


145 


195 


3 


7 


6 


221 


94 


9 


1891- '95 


36,151 


821 


2.24 


406 


355 


466 


7 


29 


41 


428 


292 


29 


1896.... 


7,504 


283 


3.77 


149 


134 


120 


163 


5 


19 


6 


109 


140 


4 


Total 
31 yrs. 


157,772 


4,755 


3.01 


2,316 


2,439 


2,229 


2,526 


141 


297 


246 


1,605 


2,207 


259 



* Exclusive of Providence city. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



1896.] CAUSES OP DEATH. 211 

FEVER, MALARIAL. 

The number of deaths, during 1896, from diseases classed as fever 
malarial, was 42. The number in 1895 was 29; in 1894 was 26; in 
1893 was 20 ; in 1892 was 36 ; in 1891, 31 ; in 1890, 42 ; in 1889, 40 ; 
in 1888, 71 ; in 1887, 85; in 1886, 44; in 1885, 30; in 1884, 25. 

Sex — Of the 42 decedents from malarial fevers, in 1896, 21 were 
males and 21 were females, or 100 males to every 100 females. 

Parentage, — There were, of the 42 decedents from malarial diseases, 
12 of native parentage, and 30 of foreign, or 250 of foreign parentage 
to every 100 of native. 

Season — The deaths from malarial diseases occurred in the different 
seasons of the year as follows : 

First Quarter 6 Third Quarter 16 

Second Quarter 10 Fourth Quarter 10 



Firsthalf 16 Second half 26 

Whole year 42 

Age, — The number of decedents in the different periods of life was 
as follows : 

Under 5 years of age 10 

Prom 5 to 20 years of age 7 

From 20 to 40 years of age .^ 10 

From 40 to 60 years of age 11 

60 and over : 8 

Not stated 1 

42 

Localities, — Bristol county, 1 ; Kent county, 2; Newport county, 2 ; 
Providence county, 33 ; Washington county, 4. 

FEVERS, TYPHOID, ETC. 

The number of decedents whose deaths were returned as having been 
caused by "fever*' of some form, not malarial nor cerebro-spinal, 
was 113. Deaths from puerperal fever are not included. 

The following Table exhibits, for each of the last thirty-one years, 
the number and the percentage, and the sex and parentage of the de- 
cedents from fevers returned as from typhoid, and the number in each 
division of the State : 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



212 



FORTY-FOUBTH REGISTRATION REPORT. 



[1896. 



Table LXXV. 

Mortality in the State from Fevers, Typhoid, etc.^1866 to 1896, 

inclusive. 



YEARS. 



5 yre., 1866-1870 
1871-1875.... 



1876 

18'i7 

1878 

1879 

1880 , 

1876-1880. 



1881. 



1888 

1884 

1885 

1881-1886. 



1886. 
1887. 



1890 

1886-1890. 



1891. 



1893 

1894 

1895 

1891-1895. 



1896 

Total, 81 years. 



641 

740 

136 
184 
150 
114 
158 



68S 

148 
229 
258 
165 
168 



958 

169 
127 
285 
148 
107 



781 

149 
183 
115 
159 
125 



681 

118 
4,591 



4.2 

8.5 

8.0 
8.0 
8.4 
2.7 
8.4 



8.1 

2.8 
4.7 
4.8 
8.2 
2.9 



.8.7 

2.9 
2.0 
8.6 
2.8 
1.5 



2.5 

2.2 
1.8 
1.6 
2.2 

1.7 



1.9 

1.5 
2.9 



FA RENTAGE. 



814 
350 

65 
68 
68 
47 
74 



317 

74 
111 
146 

83 
71 



486 

78 
67 
125 
85 
58 



413 

86 
75 
65 
93 
78 



5,837 



827 

890 

61 
71 
82 
67 
84 



866 



118 
112 



87 



91 
60 
110 
58 
49 



368 

68 

68 
60 



47 



398 

419 

71 
66 
77 
68 
94 



370 

74 
100 
117 
78 
70 



489 

76 
58 
88 
56 



817 

56 
55 
41 
46 
55 



253 

44 
2,240 



821 

55 
69 
78 
51 
64 



812 

69 
129 
141 

87 
88 



514 



93 



147 
87 



464 

98 

78 
74 
118 
70 



428 



2,851 



DIVISIONS OF THE STATE. 






22 



II 



th 



47 



77 

84 

13 
8 
6 
6 
5 



55 

9 
810 






'EC 



Is i< 



243 

263 

44 
52 
59 
44 
66 



265 

58 
56 



881 



264 

46 
49 
40 
56 
52 



243 

89 
1,648 



184 
299 

33 

44 
47 
40 
52 



216 

41 
145 
134 
64 
53 



437 

70 
38 
102 
60 
43 



813 

63 
51 
52 

70 
48 



284 

48 
1,776 






22 
12 
12 
7 
16 



IS 
6 

7 
9 
8 



43 

8 
15 
9 
9 

7 



48 

10 
7 
7 
2 
4 



30 

8 
849 



^Sxcliuive of Proyidence city. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



1896.] CAUSES OF DEATH. 213 

During 1896, of the 113 decedents from typhoid fever, there were 66 
males and 47 females, a proportion of about 140 males to every 100 
females. The difference in the sexes of the mortality from fevers is 
not usually very great. 

During the period of thirty-one years, 1866 to 1896, inclusive, the 
proportions of the sexes of the decedents from '' fever," in the State, 
were 96 females to every 100 males. 

Parentage — There were 44 decedents from enteric fever, of native 
parentage, in 1896, and 69 of foreign parentage, a proportion of about 
61 of foreign and 39 of native in every 100 decedents. 

Season 

FirstQuarter 20 Third Quarter 47 

Second Quarter 14 Fourth Quarter 32 

Firsthalf 34 Second half 79 

Whole number 118 

The following Table shows the number of decedents from fevers, in 
each division of ages, in each of the last thirty-one years, in the State 
of Rhode Island : 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



214 FORTY-FOURTH REGISTRATION REPORT. 

Table LXXVI. 
Mortality from Typhoid Fever in Age Periods, 



[1896. 



TYPHOID FEVER. 



YEARS. 



1866. 



1867. 
1868. 
1869. 
1870. 
1871. 
1872. 
1878. 
1874. 
1875. 
1876. 
1877. 
1878. 
1879. 
1880. 
1881. 
1882. 
1883. 
1884. 
1885. 
1886., 
1887. 



1890. 
1891. 



1894. 
1895. 
1896. 



Periods of Lipb. 



28 



10 



Total, 81 years. 



10 


8 


26 


13 


18 


10 


17 


18 


27 


12 


10 


14 


23 


14 


21 


10 


22 


18 


17 


16 


19 


7 


25 


12 


25 


9 


24 


22 


86 


26 


24 


18 


85 


12 


29 


9 


24 


8 


27 


27 


18 


12 


13 


11 


12 


10 


10 


11 


6 


7 


18 


8 


10 


9 


10 


8 


601 


866 



I *^ 

21 
23 
I 10 
14 
81 
20 
34 
34 
26 
19 
15 
18 
27 
14 
24 
19 
44 
46 
19 
16 
26 
16 
42 
29 
13 
25 
18 
16 
81 
10 
18 



ri7 



1,269 



; S ' 8 

I 2 I 5 

% ' S 

I 16 I 9 

11 8 

I 8 10 

I 

I ''' ® 

I 25 i 8 

i 16 9 

I 9 ' 12 

18 18 

: 5 I 10 

10 . 10 
'96 

8 ! 5 

11 \ 12 
6 8 

12 I 10 

11 , 9 
14 9 

12 11 



16 I 12 



671 1 346 , 288 



42 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



1896.] 



CAUSES OF DEATH. 



215 



Table LXXVII. 

Comparative Exhibit of the Percentage of Deaths from Typhoid 

Fever to Total Deaths from Specified Causes, in six New 

England States, for twenty-one years, 1876 to 1896, 



Bhode Island 

Maine 

New Hampshire. . 

Vermont 

Massachusetts 

Connecticut 



3.0 



8.0 



2.7 



3.4 



2.8 



4.7 



4.8 



2.92.9 



2.0 



2.2 



2.2 



2.22.23.02.1 



2.2 



8.4 2.7 



3.5 5.5 
2.5 



2.5 



3.4 3.1 
2.92.3 



3.02.22.52.52.2 



5,3.12.1 



2.42.0 
2.51.1 



2.12.8,2.2 



2.2,1.22.2 



2.2 



1.9,2.4 
1.61 
1.91.8 
2.32.3 



1.81.4 
1.42.5 



I 



1.71.5 
1.9 ... 

1.71.4'... 

2.01.7 ... 



1.41.5 
1.8,1.5 



DISEASES ON THE HEART. 

The number of decedents from the various forms of diseases of the 
heart, as reported in 1896, was 556. The number is 21 more than that 
of 1895. 

This number represents 7.41 per cent, of all causes, and a propor- 
tion of 1.41 to every one thousand of the population. 

Sex. — There were 294 male decedents, and 262 female decedents ; a 
proportion of about 112 males to every 100 females, but these propor- 
tions, although varying from year to year, are not greatly dififerent. 

Parentage. — Of the 556 decedents from diseases of the heart, in 
1896, there were 266 of native parentage, and 290 of foreign, a pro- 
portion of about 92 of native parentage to every 100 of foreign. Ex- 
cept in 1892, 1893 and 1896, it has been the invariable rule of the 
whole period of registration that the native population is more subject 
to heart disease than the foreign. 

The following Table exhibits, for each of the last thirty-one years 
1866 to 1896, inclusive, the number and percentage, and the sex and 
parentage of the decedents from diseases of the heart, and the num- 
ber of the same in each division of the State : 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



216 forty-fourth registration report. [1896. 

Table LXXVIII. 
Mortality from Diseases of the Hearty 1866 to 1896, inclusive. 



YEARS. 



.S 



s 



6 years, 1866-1870 690 
1871-1876 



1876. 
1877. 
1878. 
1879. 
1880. 



166 
182 
166 
202 
231 



1876-1880 947 



1881. 
1882. 
1888. 
1884. 
1886. 



264 
266 
326 

285 
349 



1881-1885 1,478 



1886. 
1887. 



1890. 



406 
436 
460 
405 



1886-1890 2,037 



1891. 
1892. 
1893. 
1894. 
1895. 



480 
506 



476 
585 



1891-1895 2,532 



1896. 



556 



Total, 81 years. . 9,062 5.65 4,569 4,- 



-3 



3.83 

4.49 

4.03 

4.09 

3. 

4. 

6. 



73 ! 

78 



4.25 



7.25 
6.84 
7.19 
6.65 
7.10 



7.01 



7.41 



458 

86 
94 
88 
114 
125 
507 

131 
116 
167 
135 
162 
711 



205 
196 



1,008 

248 
260 
264 
251 
260 



1,283 



294 



806 ' 282 



464 

80 
88 
78 
88 
106 
440 

133 
139 
158 
150 
187 
767 

178 
201 
240 
227 

188 



246 
271 
225 
275 



1,249 



PARKNTAOB. 




DIVISIONS OF THE 


STATE 




1 


Si 


5^ 


11 


It 


If 


1^ 

f 




395 


195 


22 


48 


48 


184 


262 


26 


595 


827 


21 


46 


82 


248 


466 


60 


109 


67 


9 


11 


10' 


88 


86 


12 


110 


ra 


8 


7 


9 


57 


98 


13 


109 


67 


6 


11 


16 


88 


83 


14 


127 


75 


8 


20 


16 


38 


111 


9 


146 


85 


9 


21 


29 


69 


104 


9 


001 


846 


84 


70 


79 


230 


477 


57 


164 


110 


9 


21 


24 


73 


121 


16 


162 


93 


8 


16 


23 


65 


142 


11 


179 


146 


8 


27 


30 


70 


172 


18 


163 


122 


6 


16 


25 


87 


139 


12 


198 


151 


18 


27 


26 


94 


159 


31 


856 


622 


44 


107 


127 


379 


783 


88 


184 


146 


12 


20 


18 


82 


168 


ao 


240 


166 


7 


21 


86 


123 


198 


26 


240 


196 


11 


22 


40 


122 


210 


81 


258 


202 


19 


31 


89 


143 


199 


29 


219 


186 


16 


49 


27 


114 


172 


28 


1,141 


896 


64 


143 


160 


584 


942 


144 


244 


236 


21 


87 


38 


137 


210 


87 


2.52 


254 


22 


47 


48 


163 


200 


26 


264 


271 


20 


43 


80 


174 


238 


80 


246 


230 


16 


82 


41 


161 


192 


84 


275 


260 


14 


41 


54 


180 


210 


86 


1,281 


1,251 


93 


200 


211 


815 


1,050 


168 


266 


290 


19 


40 


88 


189 


231 


39 


5,135 


3,927 


297 


654 


745 


2,629 


4,160 


577 



♦ Exclusive of Provideace city. 



Di^tizedbyCiOOQlC 



1896.] CAUSES OF DEATH. 217 

Sex, — Of the 9,062 persons deceased from diseases of the heart, in 
the last thirty-one years, 4,569 were males, and 4,493 were females ; 
or 102 males to each 100 females. 

Parentage, — Of the 9,062 decedents, during thirty-one years, 5,135 
were of native parentage, and 3,927 of foreign. The proportions 
would, therefore, stand as follows: To every 100 of foreign parent- 
age there were about 131 of native ; or about 57 native and 43 of for- 
eign parentage in every 100 deaths. This diflPerence has been gradu- 
ally diminishing. In 1892 there were 2 more deaths of foreign than 
of native parentage, in 1893 there were 7 more deaths of foreign than 
of native parentage, and in 1896 there were 24 more deaths of foreign 
than of native parentage. 

Diseases of the heart rank third in the order of causes in 1896. 

The following Table shows the number of decedents from diseases 
of the heart, in each divisional period of life, in each of the last thirty- 
one years : 



27 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



218 



FORTY-FOURTH REGISTRATION REPORT. 



[1896. 



Table LXXIX. 
Mortality from Diseases of the Hearty in Age Periods. 



YEARS, 



1866.. 
1867.. 
1868.. 
I860.. 
1870.. 
1871.. 
1878.. 
1878.. 
1874.. 
1875.. 
1876.. 
1877.. 
1878.. 
1879.. 
1880.. 
1881.. 
1882.. 
1888.. 
1884.. 
1885.. 
1886.. 
1887.. 
1888.. 
1889.. 
1890.. 
1891.. 
1893.. 
1898.. 
1894.. 
1895.. 
1896.. 

Total 



Periods of lifb. 



8 
11 
5 
4 
6 
12 
12 
11 
16 
16 
10 
11 
8 
9 
10 
13 
17 
18 
25 
18 
18 
80 
25 
25 
15 
18 
21 
27 
28 
20 



869 490 



98 



1,014 1,442 



16 



79 
97 
85 
78 
109 
111 
116 
102 
187 
106 



21 
27 
25 
21 
28 
28 
29 
42 
40 
41 
89 
88 
85 
86 
49 
58 
61 
76 
50 
78 
69 
87 
74 
118 
96 
101 
104 
97 
102 
111 
117 



4 

4 
5 
7 
8 
6 
18 
9 
12 
9 
10 
18 
11 
16 
28 
21 
17 
26 
82 
24 
18 
39 
88 
85 



81 
42 



51 
50 



678 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



1896.] CAUSES OF DEATH. 219 

The results of thirty-one years of registration, with record of ages 
of decedents from diseases of the heart, show in periods of twenty 
years each of life, the following percentages : 

Under 20 years of age 9.6 per cent 

Between 30 and 40 : 18.9 per cent. 

Between 40 and 60 27.1 per cent. 

Between 60 and 80 41.7 per cent. 

Over 80 7.5 per cent. 

Not stated : 2 per cent. 

100.0 per cent. 

It will be seen that more than 41 per cent, of all the deaths from dis- 
eases of the heart were of persons over 60 years of age, and under 80. 

Diseases of the heart have acquired large importance as a cause of 
death. From 88.7 in every 1,000 deaths from all causes, in 1866, heart 
diseases gradually increased to about 73 in every 1,000, in 1889, and 
falling back to slightly less than 60 per 1,000, in 1890, and rising to 
72.5 per 1,000, in 1891, and falling to 68.4 in 1892. In 1893 there 
were 71.9 deaths from heart diseases in every 1,000, in 1894 there 
were 66.5 deaths in every 1,000, in 1895 there were 71.0 deaths in 
every 1,000, and in 1896 there were 74.1 deaths in every 1,000. 

INFLUENZA. 

The event, during the first four months of the year 1890, of a very 
extraordinary and perhaps unprecedented prevalence of a form of in- 
fluenza, which was unlike that of ordinary occurrence in that it affected 
indiscriminately all the functions and nearly all the organs of the body, 
varying with the individuals attacked, and the reappearance of the 
same, although in greatly lessened numbers, in 1891, warrants a con- 
tinued notice not given previous to 1890 in the Registration Reports, 
to the affection so named. 

The disease was, in 1890, most largely confined to the respiratory 
passages, and resulted in a largely increased mortality from bronchitis 
and consumption. During 1891 the disease was equally as severe, 
affecting in a larger measure the brain and other nerve centres, and the 
direct mortality was even larger than that of 1890. The prevalence 
was largest during the second quarter of the year, and again in De- 
cember. 

The increase in December of 1891 was followed by a sudden aug- 
mentation in the first four months of the following year, 1892, the 
greatest number of* deaths, 198, occurring in January of 1892. The 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



220 FORTY-FOURTH REGISTRATION REPORT. [1896. 

total for 1892 was 336, or about twice as much as for either of the 
previous years. In 1893 there were 84 deaths reported as resulting 
from influenza. This was 251 less than in 1892. In 1894 there were 
166 deaths from influenza reported, an increase of 95 per cent, from 
1893, and a decrease of over 50 per cent, from 1892. In 1895 there 
were 115 deaths from influenza. In 1896 there were but 42 deaths 
from influenza. 

Sex. — Of the 42 deaths from influenza, in 1896, 15 were males and 
27 were females, a proportion of 56 males to every 100 females. 

Parentage — The parent nativity of the decedents was 16 of native 
and 26 of foreign. 

Season. — Of the 42 deaths from influenza, during 1896, 18 occurred 
in the first quarter of the year, 16 in the second, 5 in the third, and 3 
in the fourth quarter. 

Age. — There were 4 under 5 years of age, 3 from 5 to 20 years, 3 
from 20 to 40, 6 from 40 to 60, 19 from 60 to 80, 6 from 80 years of 
age and over, and 1, age unstated. 

The following Tables will show the proportionate nativity, sex and 
location of the disease. 

The greatest mortality appears to be among females, there being 147 
females to every 100 males. The nativity appears equally divided be- 
tween native and foreign, there being 101 foreign to 100 native. 

The largest number of deaths occurred in Providence city, but this 
is not out of proportion to the proportionate number and density of 
population. 

Referring to the age periods, it will be seen that the greatest age is 
70 to 80, there being 216, or 19.84 per cent, of the whole number of 
deaths from this disease. Taking the three decennials including 60 to 
90 we have 531 deaths, or 48.77 per cent, of all by ages. 

By season, the greatest number of deaths occurred during the winter 
months, the most severe being during January, December and Febru- 
ary. The number in January and February make a total of 572, or 
52.53 percent, of all. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



( 



1896.] CAUSES OF DEATH. 221 

Mortality in the State from Influenza^ 1890 to 1896 ^ inclusive. 



YEARS. 



1890 

1891 

1892 

1893 

1894 

1895 

1896 

1890-1896 



168 
177 
866 

85 
166 
115 

42 



2.42 
2.67 
4.54 
1.14 
2.32 
1.53 
.56 



2.17 



72 
67 
142 
34 
62 
48 
15 



96 
110 
194 

51 
104 

67 

27 



649 



PARENTAGE. 



91 
170 
47 



543 



100 



166 



78 



26 



DIYISIONS OP THE STATE. 






II 

« o 



70 






61 
60 
115 
33 
48 
42 
30 



1^ 



70 
69 
144 
82 
75 
41 
6 



437 



5 
13 
26 

5 
13 
10 

1 



78 



Influenza by Age Periods 1890-1896. 



























i 


^ 


YEARS. 


&! 




o 


a 


g 


^ 


s 


g 


^ 


s 


8 


o 


s 




1 


B 


o 


o 


3 


s 


2 


S 


s 


3 


3 


S 


1 




^ 


o 


§ 


s 


^ 


g 


8 


g 


S 


g 


1890 


14 
11 
26 
7 
6 
14 
1 


18 
12 
20 

5 
14 
10 

3 


4 

2 
4 
2 
1 
2 


8 
8 
6 
8 
5 
5 
1 


14 

14 

18 

6 

11 

8 

1 


22 
6 

19 
1 
6 
6 
2 


18 
14 
25 
7 
20 
9 
2 


17 
21 
33 

4 
12 
10 

4 


19 
29 
74 
18 
82 
16 
18 


17 
42 
74 
16 
87 
24 
6 


11 

19 
41 
16 
17 
9 
6 


5 
1 
8 
2 
4 
8 
1 


1 


1891 




1892 




1898 


1 


1894 




1895 




1896 








1890-1896 


79 


82 


15 


86 


67 


62 


95 


101 


196 


216 


119 


19 


2 


Per cent, of all ages, 




7 years 


7.25 


7.58 


1.88 


8.81 


6.15 


5.69 


8.72 


9.28 


18.00 


19.84 


10.98 


1.74 


.18 



* Bxclusiye of Providence city. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



FORTY-FOURTH REGISTRATION REPORT. 



[1896. 



Influenza by Months, 1890-1896. 



YEARS. 


Jan. 
Feb. 


1 


< 




^ 


s 


a 
< 


1 
2 

8 

1 
1 


8 

4 
2 

1 


1 

2 


P 

1 

98 
5 
36 
8 
4 
2 


1 


1890 


108 
4 

198 
6 

102 
12 
9 

438 

1 


27 
8 
62 

1 

27 
20 

4 

134 


11 
1 

81 
2 

10 

48 
5 

108 


8 
22 

27 
19 
9 
16 

7 

108 


4 
19 

9 
12 

7 
7 
5 

68 


2 

19 


2 
2 

1 
2 
5 
1 


2 
2 
2 

1 


168 


1891 


177 


1892 


836 


1893 


85 


1894 


166 


1895 ... . 


115 


1896 


2 
9 


2 

10 


1 
11 


42 






1890-1896 


44 18 


7 


149 


1,069 






1 




I 





INSAKITY. 

There were 53 deaths from iDsanity, in 1896, a decrease of 19 from 
1895. The percentage to the whole number of deaths was .70. These 
deaths occurred chiefly at the Cranston institutions, and in the Butler 
hospital. 

.Sex* — There were 28 male and 25 female decedents. 

Parentage The number of native decedents from insanity was 22, 

and of foreign parentage 31. 

Of the 53 deaths in 1896, there were 18 from dementia, 16 from 
senile dementia, 5 from acute mania, 3 from melancholia, and 11 from 
insanity. 

Of the 18 deaths from dementia, the secondary cause given in 2 
cases was pneumonia; 1, pulmonary tuberculosis; 1, asthma; 1, 
diarrhoea; 1, cancer of uterus. In 12 cases no secondary cause was 
given. 

Of the 16 deaths from senile dementia, the secondary cause given in 
2 cases was paralysis ; 2, diarrhoea ; 1, atheroma of arteries ; 1, pneu- 
monia; 1, angina pectoris; 1, valvular disease of heart ; 8 cases no 
secondary cause given. 

Of the three cases of melancholia, a secondary cause of death was 
given in 2 cases, paralysis; 1, chronic diarrhoea ; 1, meningitis ; 1, 
softening of the brain ; 6 cases no secondary cause given. 

Secondary causes, with insanity in some form as a primary cause, 
were as follows : Pn eumonia, 3 — dementia 2, and senile dementia 1 ; 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 






1896.] CAUSES OF DEATH. 223 

pulmonary tuberculosis, 1 — dementia; asthma (cardiac), 1 — dementia; 
cancer of uterus, 1 — dementia ; diarrhoea, 4 — dementia 1, senile demen- 
tia 2, insanity 1 ; paralysis, 4 — senile dementia 2, insanity 2 ; atheroma 
of arteries, 1 — senile dementia ; angina pectoris, 1 — senile dementia ; 
valvular disease of heart, 1 — senile dementia ; malnutrition, 1 — melan- 
cholia ; meningitis, 1 — insanity ; brain softening, 1 — insanity. 

The following Table shows the mortality in the State from insanity, 

for thirty-one years, with percentage to deaths from all causes, sex, 

parentage, etc., from 1866 to 1896, inclusive: 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



224 



FORTY-FOURTH REGISTRATION REPORT. 



[1896. 



YEARS. 



1816-1870. 



1871-1875., 



1876 

1877 

1878 

1879 

1880 

1876-1880. 



1881 

1882 

1868 

1884 

1886 

1881-1885. 



1886 

1887 

1888 

1880 

1890 

1886-1890. 



1891. 



1898 

1894 

1895 

1891-1895. 



1896 

Total, 31 years. . 



Table LXXX. 
Mortality in the State from Insanity. 



72 

106 

12 
19 
22 
17 
19 



155 

49 
64 
48 



208 

21 
27 



72 



208 

53 

891 



.47 



.52 



.50 
.40 
.89 



.45 
.55 



.67 



.59 

.83 
1.01 
.64 
.85 
.44 



.87 
.53 

.68 ' 



.57 
.70 
.55 





II 


1 














sxz. 


PARENTAGE. I 

1 




DIVISIONS OF THE 


STATE 






j 


1 

1 


i 


11 


si 


11 


It 

^ p 


s 

1* 


P 


88 


1 
39 


52 


20 




5 


4 


7 


55 


1 


55 


61 


76 


90 


8 


2 


8 


88 


68 


2 


5 


7 


9 


8 


1 


2 


1 


1 


6 


1 


9 


10 


9 


10 




1 




5 


12 


1 


5 
11 



17 
6 
10 


16 
10 
13 


6 
7 
6 






1 


8 

5 
6 


17 
11 
9 


1 






1 




1 


2 


1 


89 


50 


57 


82 


1 


4 


4 


20 


55 


5 


15 


17 


22 


10 


1 


1 


8 


10 


16 


1 


9 


14 


18 


5 




1 




8 


12 


2 


12 


17 


17 


12 


1 


2 




7 


18 


1 


17 


19 


24 


12 


2 


8 




21 


9 


1 


16 


19 


is 


17 






2 


23 


10 










69 


86 


99 


56 


4 


7 


5 


69 


65 


5 


21 


28 


28 


21 


3 


1 


1 


87 


7 




85 


29 


88 


31 


1 




1 


56 




6 


21 


22 


24 


19 


1 


2 




83 


7 




14 
19 


8 
11 


12 
16 


10 
14 








14 
13 


8 
14 




1 


1 


1 




110 


96 1 


113 


95 ! 

1 


6 


4 


8 


158 


36 


6 


10 


11 


16 


5 




1 




5 


13 


2 


17 


10 


15 


12 


3 


1 




8 


14 


1 


14 


25 


13 


26 








30 


9 




20 


29 


22 


27 


1 


1 




27 


18 


2 


36 


36 


44 


28 


3 




1 


41 


27 




97 


111 


! 110 

1 


98 


7 


8 


1 


lU 


81 


5 


28 


25 


1 22 


81 




2 




40 


11 




481 


460 


1 529 


863 


21 


27 


25 


488 


361 


24 



♦ Exclusive of Providence city. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



1896.] CAUSES OF DEATH. 225 

DISEASES OF THE KIDNEYS. 

There were 395 deaths returned, during 1896, with diseases of the 
kidneys assigned as the cause. 

This number represents 5.26 per cent, of all causes, and a propor- 
tion of 1.00 to every 1,000 of the population. 

Sex. — Of the 395 there were 209 males, and 186 females. 

Parentage There were 188 of native parentage and 207 of foreign, 

or about 91 of native to every 100 of foreign parentage. 

In 1890 it occurred for the first time in twenty-five years that the 
decedents from diseases of the kidneys, of foreign parentage, outnum- 
bered those of native parentage. 

Age, — Of the 395 decedents from kidney diseases 12 were under 5 
years of age, 28 from 5 to 20, 75 from 20 to 40, 133 from 40 to 60, 
133 from 60 to 80, 13, 80 and over, and 1, age unstated. 

Diseases of the kidneys have largely increased in number, and much 
larger still in proportion, during the last thirty-one years. 

During the ten years from 1866 to 1875, inclusive, the proportion of 
deaths from kidney diseases, to whole number of deaths from all causes, 
was but little more than one per cent., while during the ten years from 
1886 to 1895, inclusive, the proportion was nearly three and one-half 
per cent. 

The following Table will present various facts in .relation to the mor- 
tality from diseases of the kidneys, in Rhode Island, for thirty-one 
years, 1866-1896: 



28 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



226 



FOBTY-FOURTH REGISTRATION REPORT. 



[1896. 



Table LXXXI. 

Mortality in the State from Kidney Diseases, with the Percentage 

of the Whole Number of Deaths, Sex, Parentage, and Locality, 

for thirty-one years, from 1806 to 1896, inclusive. 



YEARS. 


1 

•m 

O 

1 

185 

295 

50 
67 
80 
79 
91 


i 

1 1 


5 yean, 1866-1870 

1871-1875 

1876 


.88 ; 

1.44 

1.28 
1 57 


1877 


1878 


1 89 ' 


1879 


1 88 1 


1880 


2 02 






1876-1880 

1881 


867 

79 
86 
129 
118 
159 


1.05 

1.69 
1.79 
2.43 
2.29 
2.97 


1882 


1888 


1884 


1885 




1881-1886 

1886 


571 

155 
169 
218 
210 
229 


2.20 
2 49 


1887 


2 66 


1888 


3 23 


1889 


3.88 1 


1890 


3.20 






1886-1890 

1891 


976 

245 
258 
802 
818 
841 


3.05 

3.06 
3.49 
4.06 
4.37 ' 
4.54 


1892 


1898 


1894 


1895 




1891-1895 

1896 


1,459 

395 

4,198 


3.90 
5. 26 


Total, 81 years.. 


2.58 



1 

>3 


1 


94 


41 


167 


128 


22 


28 


40 


27 


50 


30 


51 


28 


52 


89 


215 


152 


40 


39 


50 


36 


72 


67 


63 


65 


92 


67 


307 


2W 


85 


70 


92 


77 


102 


111 


119 


91 


116 


113 


514 


462 


123 


122 


135 


123 


154 


148 


152 


161 


176 


165 


740 


720 


209 


186 


2,246 


1,952 



' PARENTAOE. 



DIVISIONS OP THE STATE. 



1H7 

82 
85 
49 
44 
51 
211 

47 
46 
74 
66 

86 



90 
122 
122 

109 



536 

122 
127 
141 
164 

171 



725 

188 

2,256 



44 

108 

18 
82 
31 
35 
40 



156 

82 
41 
55 
52 
73 
253 

62 
79 
91 
88 
120 
440 

123 
131 
161 
149 
170 
734 

207 

1,942 



■eg 




Newport 
County. 


o c 


9 

f 


§ . 

11 


6 


7 


25 


28 


66 


8 


11 


11 


17 


67 


172 


17 


, 1 


1 


7 


10 


26 


3 


2 


1 




14 


49 


1 


4 


8 


3 


21 


47 


2 


1 


8 


1 


28 


43 


8 


1 


6 


10 


27 


46 


2 


9 


18 


21 


96 


218 


16 


7 


5 


4 


14 


48 


1 


2 


5 


10 


15 


52 


2 


6 


2 


17 


37 


60 


8 


6 


11 


12 


28 


54 


8 


1 8 


10 


17 


81 


68 


5 


27 


33 


60 


125 


302 


24 


3 


10 


22 


87 


71 


12 


5 


6 


16 


48 


92 


7 


10 


10 


24 


46 


115 


8 


14 


13 


15 


62 


96 


10 


15 


8 


21 


59 


116 


10 


47 


47 


98 


247 


490 


47 


9 


12 


25 


72 


114 


18 


9 


11 


24 


70 


128 


16 


19 


15 


25 


81 


147 


15 


22 


20 


83 


84 


136 


18 


23 


19 


29 


96 


163 


11 


82 


77 


136 


403 


688 


78 


19 


89 


34 


125 


160 


18 


201 


227 


391 


1,065 


2,091 


20S 



* Exclusive of Providence city. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



1896.] CAUSES OF DEATlt. 227 

DISEASES OF THE LIVER. 

There were 110 deaths reported in 1896 as having been caused by 
stractural diseases of the liver. 

This number represents 1.47 per cent, of all causes, and a propor- 
tion of .28 to every 1,000 of the population. 

Of the 110 decedents there were 56 males and 54 females, or 96 fe- 
males to every 100 males. 

There were 37 of native parentage and 73 of foreign, or about 51 
of native to every 100 of foreign. 

Eighty-eight of the whole number were of persons of forty years of 
age and over. 

In the age period of from five to forty, there were but twenty-two 
decedents from diseases of the liver. 

The mortality from such diseases does not depend to any marked 
extent upon the influence of season. 

Table LXXXII will present various facts relating to diseases of the 
liver during Ihirty-one years : 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



228 



forty-fourth registration report. 
Table LXXXII. 



[1896. 



Percentage to Whole Number of Deaths, Sex, Parentage and La- 
cality of Decedents from Diseases of the Liver, 1866-1896. 





1 
"S 

1 

s i 

^ 1 


1 


be: 


C. PA KEN 


Foreign. o 


1 


Kent 2 
County. , g 

Newport g 
County. Q 


THE 8 

" 1 


TATE. 




YEARS. 


t 
1 


i 
1 


1. 
■Si 

F 


§. 


1866-1870 

1871-1875 

1876 


201 

202 

45 
52 
49 
52 

58 
250 

46 
02 
51 
48 
01 
268 

54 

80 
68 
70 
65 


1.81 

.98 ' 

1.09 

1.17 ! 

1.10 

1.24 

1.27 

1.15 

1 
.92 i 

l.SK ' 

M ; 

1.13 


113 

91 

26 
28 
25 
27 
20 


K8 

111 ; 

1 

10 


118 
110 
27 


88 

88 

18 
21 
17 
21 

18 

"~95" 

26 

26 
31 ' 
25 
20 ' 


12 

18 

1 
1 
8 
4 
4 
18 

2 
8 
5 
5 
2 
17 

4 
8 

1 
1 
3 


14 
14 
5 

1 
4 
8 
13 

2 
5 
6 
8 

6 


86 

12 

6 
7 
6 
2 
8 


47 

56 

11 ! 

10 

14 

14 

15 


70 

88 

18 
24 
18 
22 
25 


22 

14 
5 


1877 


1 ' 

29 1 31 

24 82 

25 81 


4 


1878 


2 


1879 


6 


1880 


29 


1 40 
161 


8 


1876-1880 

1881 


130 

ao 

34 
27 
22 
24 


126 1 

i 
16 


»4H 

6 
10 
4 
5 
6 


70 

8 
17 
16 

21 


107 

24 
24 
18 
31 
24 


20 
4 


1882 


28 'l 86 


8 


1888 


1 
24 1 

26 


20 
23 


2 


1884 


2 


1885 


37 ' 82 


2 










182 




1881-1885 

1886 


1.08 ' 

.92 
1.85 
1.08 
1.12 

.94 


187 

29 
40 
88 
80 
42 
179 

41 
89 
48 
43 
43 


131 
25 


136 1 

28 
48 
82 
39 
86 


22 

4 
5 
5 
2 
4 


81 

4 
8 
6 
10 
6 


64 

14 
81 
28 
26 
21 


121 

28 
89 
26 
29 
26 


13 


1887 


46 1 88 
80 '■ 86 
40 ;'' 81 
23 1 29 


5 


1888 


2 


1889 


2 


1890 






164 
40 






1836-1890 

1891 


348 

81 
89 
72 

1 93 

1 

1 81 


1.07 

1.23 
1.20 
.97 
1.80 
1.07 


. ICO 

1 

, 2ft 


183 

58 
65 
42 
51 
63 


12 

3 
8 
4 
2 


20 

4 
5 
8 
9 
8 


29 

9 
4 
6 
9 
10 


120 

26 
27 
15 
42 
27 


148 

88 
45 
86 

81 


14 


1892 


1 
50 84 

29 ', 80 

i 50 ; 42 

1 !l 

1 88 ' 28 




1998 




1894 




1895 




1891-1895 

1896 

Total. 31 years . 


416 

110 

1,796 


1.15 1 209 
1.47 56 

1.12 ; 915 

1 


207 
54 
881 


162 
87 
889 


254 
73 
907 


12 
3 

92 


32 

7 

122 


38 

6 

180 


187 
40 
534 


174 
48 
756 


Hi 

6 

112 



♦ Exclusive of Providence city. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



1896.] CAUSES OF deaM. 22d 

DROPSY. 

During 1896 there were 2 deaths returned as having been caused by 
dropsy. 

This number represents .03 per cent, of deaths from all causes, and 
a proportion of .005 to every one thousand of tlie population. 

It has been repeatedly observed in previous reports that although this 
term is a misnomer in a large measure, and conveys no definite idea of 
the pathological condition preceding the dropsical accumulation, it is, 
nevertheless, the only cause returned, and as it is in some instances the 
apparently immediate cause of death, it is given a place in the Regis- 
tration Reports ; and as a frequent result and concomitant of diseases 
of the kidneys and liver, it has been placed in comparison with them 
in the following Table. 

Of the 2 decedents from dropsy 1 was male and 1 was female.. 

The female decedents from dropsy have been, in nearly every year, 
in a considerable number, in excess of the male decedents. 

Of the parentage 1 was of native, and 1 of foreign parentage. 

It will be noticed that the number of deaths from dropsy, for 1896, 
was but two. This is explained by the fact that the diagnosis of 
dropsy was not accepted as a cause but as a symptom. In these cases 
strenuous effort was made by the Registrar to ascertain the cause of 
the dropsy from the physician, in every case so reported. The large 
number returned from that cause was distributed under the headings of 
heart disease, liver disease or disease of the kidneys, as finally ascer- 
tained from the physician in charge. These groups of diseases are 
therefore correspondingly increased over the numbers of previous years. 

In these two cases the causation of the ascites was so obscure that 
no decision could be arrived at, either as a result of the physician hav- 
ing been called after death, or in the absence of any previous historj'. 

An examination of Table LXXXIII will serve as evidence of the 
greater carefulness and better judgment of the medical practitioners 
of the present time, inasmuch as the causes of dropsy are now better 
understood and reported, and for that reason the number of deaths 
attributed to dropsy have diminished nearly ninety-nine per cent. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



230 



POBTTf-foURTH REGIStBAttON REt>ORT. 



tisse. 



Table LXXXIII. 

Mortality from Kidney and Liver Diseases compared with Dropsy 
{so returned) for thirty-one years — 1866-1896. 



YEARS. 



1866-1870... 

1871-1876... 

1876 

187T 

1878 

1879 

1880 

1876-1880... 

1881 

1882 

1883 

1884 

1885 

1881-1885... 

1886 

1887 

1888 

1869 

1890 

1886-1890... 

1891 

1892 

1893 

1894 

1895 

1891-1895. . . 

1896 

Total,31 yrs 



DEATHS FROM 
KIDNBT DI8BA8E8. 


« 


i 


£ 


185 


94 


41 


295 


167 


128 


50 


22 


28 


67 


40 


27 


80 


50 


80 


79 


51 


28 


91 


52 


39 
152 


867 


215 


79 


40 


89 


86 


60 


86 


129 


72 


57 


118 


53 


65 


159 


92 


67 


571 


807 


264 


155 


85 


70 


169 


92 


77 


218 


102 


111 


210 


119 


91 


229 


116 


113 


976 


514 


462 


245 


128 


122 


258 


185 


123 


802 


154 


148 


813 


152 


161 


841 


176 


165 


1,459 


740 


719 


895 


209 


186 


4,198 


2,246 


1,952 



DEATHS 




FROM LIVER 


] 


DISEASES. 




3 


1 


1 




201 


113 


88 




202 


91 


111 




45 


26 


19 




62 


23 


29 




40 


25 


24 




52 


27 


25 




58 


29 


29 




256 


130 


126 




46 


80 


16 




62 


84 


28 




61 


27 


24 




48 


22 


26 




61 


24 


87 




268 


187 


131 




54 


29 


25 




86 


40 


46 




68 


38 


30 




70 


80 


40 




65 


42 


23 




343 


179 


164 




81 


41 


40 




89 


39 


50 




72 


43 


29 




93 


43 


50 




81 


43 


38 




416 


209 


207 




110 


56 


54 




1,796 


915 


881 





TOTAL DEATHS 

FROM KIDNEY AND 

LIVER DISEASES. 



886 

497 

95 I 
119 ; 
129 I 
181 ' 
149 ' 
623 

125 I 

I 
148 

180 

166 

220 



839 

209 
255 
281 
280 
294 



1,319 

826 
347 
874 
406 
422 



1,875 
505 

5,994 



207 

258 

48 
63 
75 
78 
81 
345 

70 
84 
99 
75 
116 



444 

114 
132 
140 
149 
158 



164 
174 
197 
195 
219 
949 

265 
3,161 



129 

239 

47 
56 
54 
58 



27-H 

55 
64 
81 
91 
104 



95 
123 
141 
131 
136 



173 
177 
211 



926 
240 

2,833 



DEATHS 
FROM DROPSY. 



302 

294 

70 
64 
44 
54 



278 

48 
52 
47 
40 
44 



231 

45 
35 
47 
42 
44 



213 
35 



7 

4 

124 



1,444 



646 



798 



6 2-0 
53 § 



—84 

—203 

—25 
—55 

—85 

-77 

-103 



-845 

-77 
-96 
-133 
-126 
-176 



-608 

-164 
-220 
—234 
-238 
-250 



-1106 

-291 
—808 
-335 
—899 

—418 



-1751 
—503 

—4550 






1.96 

1.43 

1.70 
1.44 

.99 
1.21 

.95 



1.25 
.96 

1.02 
.89 
.78 



.77 
.55 
.71 

.67 



.67 

.62 
.58 
.52 
.10 
.05 
~M 

.08 
.92 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



1896.] CAUSES OF DEATH. 231 

MEASLES. 

There were 58 decedents from measles as a cause of death in 1896. 
The number is 5 more than in the preceding year. 

This number represents .77 per cent, of all causes, and a proportion 
of .15 to every 1,000 of the population. 

Of the 58 there were 28 males and 30 females. The sexes seem to 
be nearly equally susceptible to measles and to mortality therefrom. 

Of parentage there were 22 of native, and 36 of foreign. 

During the last ten years the proportion of mortality from measles 
has been about 59 of native to every 100 of foreign parentage. 

During 1896 the number of decedents under five years of age was 54. 

The number in the different divisions of the State may be found in 
Table LXXXIV : 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



232 fobty-fourth registration report. 

Table LXXXIV. 

Mortality in the State from Measles — 1865-1896. 



[1896. 





1 

1 

92 

102 

4 
11 

81 


1 
I 

.60 

- 
.50 

.10 

.25 

1.82 


8E 

44 
48 

3 
89 


1 
1 

' 48 i 

59 

4 

8 

42 

1 


1 

>ARE> 

1 

26 

53 

1 
2 
25 


TAGE. 


1 


DIVISIONS or THE 


STATE. 




YEARS. 


66 

49 

8 
9 
56 


It 
SI 

i 6 

i 


If 

4 
12 


1^ 


P 




It 


6year8,1866-18;o. 
5years,1871-1875. 
1876 


12 


35 

89 

8 
26 


23 
35 


4 


1877 






1 


2 

50 




1878 


2 


8 




1879 




1880 


9 


.20 

.47 

.74 
.12 
.27 
.85 

.84 
.46 

.80 

2.08 

.22 

,47 

1.82 


8 
45 

11 

10 

27 

CO 

1 

11 

i 69 
5 
15 
45 


6 


2 


7 








6 


3 














1876-1880 

1881 


105 

37 
6 
14 

18 
45 


CO 

20 ' 
5 ' 
3| 
8 1 

18 

54 

63 
6 
14 1 

47 


80 
15 



5 
19 
4H 

4 
57 

3 
10 
42 


75 

22 

6 
5 
18 
26 


1 ^ 


3 

1 


' 1 
2 


44 

9 
2 
3 
3 
27 


• 55 
25 

8 
7 
8 




1882 




1883 


1 1 
1 

2 


1 
6 


1 
2 


2 


1884 




1885 


1 






1881-1885 

1886 


120 

18 
132 
11 
29 
92 


72 

14 
75 
8 
19 
50 


15 

5 
5 
2 

8 
10 


5 
8 


44 

26 

7 

7 

41 


52 

9 
90 

2 
14 
31 


3 


1887 


3 


1888 




1889 




1890 


8 






1886-1890 

1891 


282 

12 

28 

100 

9 

53 


.88 

.18 
.88 
1.34 
.12 
.70 


1 145 

7 
14 
56 

4 
24 


137 

5 
14 

44, 
5 1 
29 


116 

4 
10 
33 

3 
11 


166 

8 
18 
67 

6 
42 


2 


SO 

2 
2 
11 


8 
2 

* 

2 


85 

8 
11 
22 

2 

8 


146 

8 
11 
64 

5 
40 


11 
1 


1892 




1898 


3 


1894 




1895 




5 








1891-1895 

1896 


202 

58 
961 


.54 

.77 
. 60 


105 

28 
476 


97 

30 

485 


61 

22 
356 


141 

86 
605 


17 


20 

6 
90 


8 

8 
44 


46 

28 
821 


128 

19 

465 


4 
2 


Total, 81 years. 


34 



♦ Exclusive of Providence city. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



1896.] CAUSES OF DEATH. 233 

OLD AGE, 

The number of deaths, in 1896, attribated to old age as a cause, was 
206. 

This number represents 2.74 per cent, of all causes, and a propor- 
tion of .52 to every 1,000 of the population. 

This is 9 more than in 1896. 

Of the 206 decedents from old age 84 were males, and 122 were 
females, or about 69 males to every 100 females. 

Of the parentage of the 206, there were 112 of native and 94 of 
foreign parentage, or 119 of native to every 100 of foreign. 

The following Table will present the statistics of deaths in Rhode 
Island from old age for thirty-one years. 

PERITONITIS. 

There were 23 deaths which were caused by peritonitis during 1896. 
This number represents .31 per cent, of all causes, and a proportion 
of .06 to every 1,000 of the population. 

Sex Of the 23 decedents from peritonitis there were 8 males and 

15 females, a proportion of nearly 187 females to every 100 males. 

Parentage, — There were 7 of native parentage and 16 of foreign, or 
a ratio of 44 native to every 100 of foreign parentage. 

Season, — The seasons do not as a rule have a notable influence in 
regard to the mortality from peritonitis. 



29 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



234 



FORTY-FOURTH REGISTRATION REPORT. 



[1896. 



Table LXXXV. 

Mortality in the State from Old Age, icith the Percentage of the 

Whole Number of Deaths, Sex, Parentage, and Locality, for 

thirty -one years, from 1860 to 1896, inclusive. 



YEARS. 



s 

a 









5 years,! 800-1870. 998 6.48 806 



1871-1875 1,158 5.64 



1876. 
1877. 
1878. 
1879. 
1880. 



•I 241 I 

. 813 I 

•I 222 I 

.1 Ji20 

.' 273 . 



1876-1880 1,169 



1881. 
1882. 
1883. 
188-1. 
1885. 



247 I 



275 
298 
267 



1881-1883 1,365 



1886. 
1887. 
1888. 
1889. 
1690. 



6.18 
5.00 
5.25 
5.22 
5.95 
27.60 

5.29 
5.89 
5.22 
5.68 
4.95 
5.27 



467 

107 

96 

84 

82 
121 
490 

101 I 
110 j 
105 I 



691 

134 
117 
138 
138 
152 
679 

146 
178 
170 



276 4.69 
278 ' 4.38 
290 ' 4. 85 
227 ! 3.68 

198 2.87 



101 I 192 

86 ' 181 

508 I 862 

I 

101 I 175 

108 I 175 

108 ' 182 

75 I 152 

72 ' 126 



1886-1890 1,269 3.97 \ 459 1 810 



I 



1891 

1892 

1893 

1894 

1895 

1891-1895. 



1896. 



185 2.80 

256 3.46 

183 ' 2.44 

187 2.61 

197 2.61 

1,008 2.78 



206 2.74 

* ' 



Total, 31 years..' 7,173 4.52 ,2,761 



PARENTAGE. 






D1VI8IONS or THE STATE. 






. I 



"X o 



95 


161 


72 


111 


60 


127 


82 


115 


392 


616 


84 


122 


,761 


4,412 



764 


2H4 


883 


825 1 


177 


64| 


145 


68 1 


172 


50 i 


162 


68 ' 


186 


87 


832 


387 


167 


1 
80 ' 


190 


98l 


184 


91 : 


198 


^1 


183 


84 


920 


445, 


181 


95 


167 


1 
111 , 


198 


92, 


136 


91 


123 


75 ! 


805 


464 


121 


64 ' 


168 


88 


113 


70 


109 


78 , 


105 


92 1 

892 


616 


112 


1 


4,882 


2,291 








55 


102 


61 


103 


12 


14 


12 


28 


15 


8 


14 


19 


12 


20 





Q? 


CD 


a 


t . 


«*. 






1^ 


§^ 


V ^ 


a»- 


"O a 


•O^ 


o a 


¥ 


p 


•sg 


>50 




157 


238 


^ 


134 



161 

88 
29 
82 
26 
84 



12 


24 


20 


25 


17 


18 


16 


20 


9 


32 



84 ! 159 

36 
40 
44 



18 I 

9 

8 
12 
17 



119 



19 



19 
111 

16 

24 
16 
21 
17 



182 



26 



8 
402 



94 



28 



K82 

65 
57 
76 
69 
90 



357 

98 
106 

91 
106 

87 



483 

100 
109 
124 
73 
59 



465 



65 

91 
83 
23 i 64 
16 I 87 



19 ' 

I 



118 340 

13 , 89 
I 
941 2,849 



848 

71 
63 
61 
67 
78 



385 

72 
79 

84 



391 

73 
76 
64 
71 



847 

41 
71 
92 
51 
51 



57 
2,061 



153 

41 
29 
30 
25 
44 



160 

10 
18 
21 
26 
22 



92 

27 
28 
85 
27 



19 
82 
15 

16 



16 
794 



" Exclusive of Providence city. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



1896.] CAUSES OF DEATH. 235 

PNEUMONIA. 

There were 669 decedents from pneumonia in 1896. The number is 
16 less than in 1895. 

This number represents 8.9 per cent, of all causes, and a proportion 
of 1.7 to every 1,000 of the population. 

Sex. — Of the 669 decedents from pneumonia, and including conges- 
tion of the lungs, 366 were males and 303 were females ; or about 83 
females to every 100 males. 

Parentage — By parentage there were 274 of native and 395 of for- 
eign parentage. The proportion of decedents from pneumonia was 
about 69 of native to each 100 of foreign parentage. 

Season — There were 356, or about 53 per cent., of the deaths that 
occurred during the first four months of the year. The largest mor- 
tality by months was 101 in April, 89 in January, 85 in February, and 
81 in March. 

Pneumonia, as a cause of death, has increased in the ratio to whole 
number of deaths, during the last thirty-one years, from an average of 
6.3 per cent., during the first ten years, to an average of 8.6 per cent, 
during the last ten, including 1896. 

The following Table presents, for each of the last thirty-one years, 
the number and the percentage, with the sex and the parentage of the 
decedents from pneumonia ; and the number in each year, in each 
division of the State : 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



236 



FORTY-FOURTH REGISTRATION REPORT. 



[1896. 



Table LXXXVI. 

Mortality in the State from Pneumonia, 1866 to 1896, inclusive. 



YEARS. 



6 yrs., 186&-18T0 
1871-1875 



1876 

18:7 

1878 

1879 

1880 

1876-1880. 



1881 

1888 

1888 

1884 

1885 

1881-1883. 



1886. 
1887. 
1888. 
1889. 



1886-1890. 



1891 . 
1692. 



1894 

1895 

1891-1895. 



1 




1 

6 


s 


988 


6.0 


1,831 


6.5 


889 


8.2 


828 


5.1 


817 


7.1 


811 


7.4 


864 


7.0 



1,557 

}tt7 
844 
400 
863 
465 



Total, 31 years. 



1,899 

481 
488 
506 
488 



2,520 

568 
655 

776 
665 
685 



3,849 



12,262 



6.6 
7.2 
7.8 
7.1 
8.6 
7.8 

8.2 
7.7 
7.7 
7.7 
8.2 
7.9 

8.5 
8.8 
10.4 
9.8 
9.1 
9.2 



467 

667 

164 
104 
148 
148 
180 



177 
178 
192 
107 
214 



928 

282 
260 
274 
255 



1,809 

270 
885 
412 
844 
840 



1,701 

366 
6,177 



461 

664 

175 
122 
174 
168 
184 
818 

150 
160 
808 
196 
851 
971 



240 



234 



281 



1,220 



298 



864 



845 



PARENTAGE. 



— I "" 

556 I 872 



788 

162 
127 
176 
168 
177 
805 

190 
163 
198 
192 
271 



648 

177 
99 
141 
148 
187 
762 

137 
181 
202 
171 
194 



1,014 

284 
227 
287 
213 
247 



1,148 

247 
265 
819 
305 



885 

247 

261 

281 
270 



1,881 

821 
890 
457 



1,648 


1,425 


1,924 


803 


274 


895 


6,085 


6,005 


6,257 





DIVISIONS OF THE 


STATE. 




It 
48 


56 


66 


§& 

l§ 

go 


8 

Is 

r 


It 
f 


287 


407 


60 


54 


71 


62 


885 


668 


97 


18 


28 


16 


97 


168 27 


10 


7 


14 


81 


98 16 


10 


11 


18 


110 


140 88 


7 


16 


15 


108 


156 


15 


86 


16 


18 


92 


108 


20 


66 


78 


81 


488 


749 


106 


10 


88 


17 


81 


174 


82 


10 


28 


24 


61 


176 


21 


19 


21 


84 


108 


204 


14 


10 


18 


17 


185 


1T2 


8G 


15 


20 


83 


151 


207 1 19 


04 


99 


125 


556 


9S8j 102 


17 


29 


87 


161 


209! 88 


18 


27 


39 


142 


207 


40 


16 


87 


29 


171 


2:19 


86 


18 


37 


29 


169 


808 


22 


16 


86 


80 


206 


246 


35 


80 


166 


164 


849 


1,1^ 


161 


17 


40 


70 


188 


2^ 


26 


18 


57 


52 


216 


2^ 


86 


18 


42 


40 


282 


392 


43 


18 


47 


46 


224 


2^6 


54 


28 


49 


25 


248 

1,098 


2^1 48 


99 


285 


212 


l,4e9 806 


28 


45 


89 


263 


2^ 43 


429 


744 


779 


3,921 


5,605 784 



♦Exclusive of Providence city. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



1896.] 



CAUSES OF DEATH. 



237 



Table LXXXVII. 

Exhibiting the Number of Decedents from Pneumonia^ in each of 

the several Periods of Life^ during each of the last thirty-one 

years, from 1866 to 1896, inclusive. 



years. 


id 

1 


s 


a 

© 

4 
2 
8 
1 
5 
2 
1 
8 
4 
8 
4 

4 
1 
8 
2 
4 
2 
5 

10 
7 
7 
6 
8 

10 
4 
9 
8 
9 
9 
7 


s 


o 

i 


s 


o 


s 

2 


a 

8 




i 
1 


1 
1 


1866 


57 

57 

70 

64 

84 

71 

83 

105 

76 

120 

116 

79 

115 

102 

95 

102 

71 

88 

108 

121 

111 

132 

103 

120 

161 

126 

189 

176 

169 

172 

220 


4 

9 

4 

11 

6 

7 

5 

4 

9 

9 

5 

2 

9 

8 

18 

4 

3 

15 

14 

9 

10 

15 

20 

14 

7 

10 

10 

25 

19 

16 

20 


5 
8 
8 
2 
4 
7 
7 
3 
• 6 
8 
8 
7 

10 
3 

16 
5 

14 

18 

11 
8 

19 
7 

15 

go 

12 

11 
10 
17 
18 
20 
17 


12 
10 
15 
11 
6 
10 
17 
10 
17 
22 
20 
15 
14 
14 
14 
15 
22 
82 
28 
28 
32 
32 
49 
27 
46 
42 
39 
49 
47 
49 
S3 


10 

11 

8 
12 

7 
17 
20 
14 
17 
80 
20 
15 
17 
27 

as 

22 
36 
38 
84 
29 
35 
43 
48 
86 
55 
64 
69 
68 
56 
56 
55 


14 
13 
16 
9 
8 
16 
19 
16 
25 
35 
82 
24 
28 
26 
37 
26 
49 
40 
24 
50 
50 
61 
61 
51 
55 
60 
76 
96 
67 
77 
56 


21 
16 
18 
28 
14 
16 
22 
17 
21 
89 
35 
27 
20 
35 
46 
45 
88 
53 
32 
49 
58 
66 
62 
57 
55 
70 
74 
115 
72 
66 
71 


25 
25 
19 
25 
20 
85 
24 
24 
40 
61 
48 
22 
42 
38 
47 
48 
41 
49 
53 
76 
74 
64 
70 
77 
79 
84 
110 
102 
78 
94 
83 


82 
18 
27 
16 
19 
17 
19 
23 
27 
43 
89 
24 
45 
38 
43 
31 
46 
46 
87 
59 
55 
53 
54 
47 
64 
70 
71 
70 
77 
77 
66 


9 
12 
18 
11 

8 
19 
11 
10 

8 
28 
17 

9 
13 
19 
12 
26 
21 
27 
23 
29 
80 
28 
21 
31 
88 
37 
44 
50 
52 
49 
40 




1867 


1 


1868 




1869 




1870 


1 


1871 


1 


1872 


1 


1878 




1874 




1875 


2 


1876 




1877 


2 


1878 




1879 




]880 




1881 


1 


1882 


4 
2 
4 
2 


1888 


1884 


1885 


1886 


1887 




1888 




1889 




1890 


2 


1891 


1892 


5 


1898 


1894 


1 


1895 


1896 


1 




Total, 81 years.... 


3,40h 


821 


146 


304 


767 


987 


1,206 


1,888 


1,677 


1,888 


740 


90 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



238 FORTY-FOUBTH REGISTRATION REPORT. [1896. 

Age — Of the decedents from pneumonia, during the period of thirty- 
one years, 27.7 per cent, were under five years of age. Of over fifty 
years of age the number of decedents was 41.5 per cent, of the whole 
number. 

The following summary will present the percentages for 1896, in 
round numbers : 

Under five years of age 33 per cent. 

Five years and under twenty, and not stated 7 per cent. 

Twenty years and under fifty 21 per cent. 

Fifty years and over 39 per cent. 

SCARLATINA. 

The number of deaths returned as having been caused by scarlatina, 
in 1896, was 53. The number is 54 less than in 1895. 

This number represents .7 per cent, of all causes, and a proportion 
of .13 to every 1,000 of the population. 

Sex. — Of the 53 decedents from scarlatina 30 were males, and 23 
were females ; or about 77 females to every 100 males. 

Parentage — There were 24 of native parentage, and 29 of foreign ; 
a proportion of about 121 of foreign parentage to every 100 of native. 

The following Table will present the statistics of scarlatina for the 
last forty-one years, from 1856 to 1896, inclusive, the number and per- 
centage and sex of the decedents from scarlatina, and the number from 
scarlatina in each division of the State. It also shows, from 1866 to 
1896, inclusive, the parentage of the decedents from scarlatina: 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



1896.] 



CAUSES OF DEATH. 



239 



Table LXXXVIII. 

Mortality in the State frovii Scarlet Fever ^ 1856 to 1896, inclusive. 





1 

"o 

1 

5z; 


4i 

a 

2 


SEX. 


PARENTAGE. 




DIVISIONS OF THE 


STATE. 




years. 


, '3 




i 


5 


0^ 
•r d 

£6 










§ . 

11 


10 yrs., 1856-1865 

1866-1870 

1871-1875 

1876 


1,440 

496 

1,053 

80 
62 
86 
311 
468 


5:2 

3.2 

5.1 

1.9 
1.4 
1.9 
7.4 
10.0 


700 

231 

503 

34 

1 26 

41 

\ 

164 

1 215 


740 

265 

550 

46 
36 
45 
147 
258 






57 

26 

40 

3 

14 

3 

3 

22 


79 

82 

53 

2 
4 
5 
6 
30 


191 

27 

51 

7 
3 
3 
4 
11 


414 

142 

802 

21 
21 
14 
87 
143 


684 

286 

534 

35 

12 

57 

255 

243 


65 


210 

513 

42 
29 
35 
180 
216 


286 

540 

38 
S3 
51 
181 
252 


83 
78 
12 


1877 


8 


1878 


4 


1879 


6 


1880 


19 


1876-1880 

1881 


1,007 

138 
45 
84 
94 
91 


4.5 

3.0 
0.9 
0.6 
1.8 
1.7 


480 

79 
24 
17 
39 
36 


527 

59 
21 
17 
58 
55 


452 

62 
16 
14 
41 
48 
181 

29 
95 
91 
14 
6 


555 

76 
29 
20 
56 
48 
224 

59 

171 

116 

87 

10 


45 
11 

1 


47 

25 
3 

1 


28 

12 
16 
5 

8 
6 


236 

41 
7 
9 

28 
24 


602 

45 
18 
16 
57 
38 


49 
4 


1882 


1 


1883 


2 


1884 


4 


1885 




3 


20 






1881-1885 

1886 


405 

88 

266 

207 

51 

16 


1.6 

1.5 
4.2 
8.1 

0.8 
0.2 


195 

46 

120 

1 

1 101 

24 

11 


210 

42 
146 
106 

27 
5 


12 

9 

1 
3 


32 

13 
16 
29 
2 
8 


47 

2 
4 
10 
6 


109 

41 
80 
87 
14 
2 


174 

80 
154 
80 
25 

8 


31 
2 


1887 


3 


1888 

1889 


1 


1890 


3 






1886-1890 

1891 


628 

33 
67 
193 
123 
107 


2.0 

0.5 
0.0 
2.6 
1.7 
1-4 


302 

17 
38 
86 
59 
, 52 


326 

16 
29 
107 
64 
55 


235 

12 
21 
75 
52 
42 


898 

21 
46 
118 
71 
65 


18 

1 
1 
1 
2 
1 


63 

8 
4 
23 
8 
2 


22 

4 
3 
2 
3 


224 

9 
20 
68 
55 
87 


297 

17 
88 
97 
56 
68 


9 
8 


1892 




1898 


1 


1894 

1895 


1 






1890-1895 

1896 


523 

53 
5,605 


1.4 

0.7 
3.4 


252 

30 
2,693 


271 

23 
2,912 


202 

24 

1,817 


321 

29 
2,348 


6 
199 


40 

2 

348 


12 

1 
879 


189 

9 
1,625 


271 

88 

2,781 


5 

8 


Total, 41 years. . 


273 



* Exclusive of Providence city. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



240 



FORTY-FOURTH REGISTRATION REPORT. 



[1896. 



CRODP, DIPHTHERIA AND SCARLATINA. — SeasoTi and Mortality. 

Tbe followiag Table is coDtinued, to show by comparison the IdAu- 
enee of season in regard to the mortality from croup and scarlatina for 
forty-four years, and diphtheria for thirty-nine years. The Table will 
give the average monthly and quarterly percentages of deaths from 
each cause : 

Table LXXXIX. 



MONTHS. 



January.. < 
February . 
March 



First Quarter. 



April. 
May.. 
June.. 



Second Quarter. 



July 

August 

September. 



Third Quarter. 



October 

November. 
December.. 



Fourth Quarter. 
Totals 



CROUP. 
1858-1896. 



Number 

of 
deaths. 



808 
845 



Percent. 

12.67 
11.08 
9.02 



l,OiW 82. 



827 
162 
188 

627 

105 
89 
183 

877 

831 
440 
432 

1,203 

8,127 



6.18 
4.41 

16.85 

8.30 

2.85 
5.86 

12.06 

10.59 
14.07 
13.81 



38.47 
100.00 



DIPHTHERIA. 

1868-1896. 



Number 

of 
deaths. 



585 
892 

416 



872 
877 



1,078 



812 



1,044 

691 
708 
617 



2,016 



5,466 



Per cent. 

9.61 
7.17 
7.61 

24.89 

6.81 
6.90 
6.92 

19.63 

5.71 
6.02 
7.37 



19.10 

12.64 
12.95 
11.29 



36.88 



100.00 



SCARLATINA. 
1858-1896. 



Number 

of 
deaths. 



772 
700 
629 



2,101 

586 
562 
477 



1,575 



862 



316 



977 



427 
530 



1,645 



6,298 



Percent. 



12.26 
11.11 
9.99 



38.86 



8.51 



7.58 



25.01 

5.75 
4.75 
5.01 

15.51 

6.78 
8.42 
10.92 

26.12 

100.00 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



1896.] CAUSES OF DEATH. 241 

SUICIDE. 

The number of deaths by suicide, in Rhode Island, during 1896, was 
38, which is 7 more than in the preceding year. 

There were 28 male and 10 female decedents from that cause, or a 
proportion of nearly 3 males to every 1 of the females. 

Of the 38, 20 were of native parentage and 18 of foreign. 

The means of self-destruction, according to the returns, were as fol- 
lows : By cutting throat, 2 cases ; by hanging, 8 ; by illuminating gas, 
9 ; by morphine, 1 ; by pistol shot, 12 ; by poison, 5 ; by strangula- 
tion, 1. 

The proportion of suicides to all other causes of death in Rhode 
Island, during 31 years, has in but one quinquennial period exceeded 
one-half of one per cent. 



30 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



242 



FORTY-FOURTH REGISTRATION REPORT. 



[1896. 



Table XC. 

Mortality in the State from Suicide, with the Percentage of the 

Whole Number of DeathSj Sex, Parentage, and Locality, for 

thirty-one years, from 1866 to 1896, inclusive. 





1 
1 


1 

1 


BE 

1 


X. 


PABEK 

i 
1 


TAOB. 


DIVISIONS OV 


THE 


9TATE. 




YEARS. 


11 


if 


li 




'OS 

f 




1866-1870 

1871-1876 

1876 


86 

89 

18 
82 
81 
18 
10 


.66 

.48 

.46 
.58 
.60 
.81 
.80 


67 

61 

16 
16 
16 
10 
6 


19 

88 

8 

6^ 

6 

8 

5 


66 
67 

6 
16 
18 

6 

8 


80 

88 

18 
7 
9 
8 
8 


8 
8 


7 
9 


6 
6 

1 

1 


81 

SO 

5 
5 
6 

6 
6 


34 

48 

10 
18 

7 
7 
8 


6 
8 
2 


1877 


8 


8 
8 


2 


1878 


4 


1879 


1 


1880 




1 


1 








1876-1880 

1881 


84 

88 
81 
85 
88 

80 


88 

.49 
.64 
.47 
.48 
.87 


68 

19 
88 
18 
80 
16 


88 

4 
8 
7 
8 
4 


46 

16 
88 
11 
18 
11 


88 

8 
8 
14 
9 
9 


8 

1 


6 

6 
4 


8 

8 
8 
8 
1 
6 


86 

8 
8 
6 
8 


S8 

14 
18 
16 
11 
6 


9 
1 


1888 


8 


1888 




1884 


1 


1 
1 


8 


1885 


8 






1881-1886 

1886 


181 

17 
16 
21 
84 
19 


.47 

.89 
.85 
.48 
.88 
.88 


96 

16 
18 
80 
80 
15 


86 

1 
8 
1 
4 
4 


78 

18 

8 
15 

9 
12 


48 

5 

8 
6 
15 

7 


8 

1 
8 

8 


11 
8 

1 
8 


15 

8 
8 
8 
5 

1 


26 

4 
5 
6 

7 
8 


58 

7 
7 
9 
10 
5 


10 


1887 

1888 


2 


1889 




1890 


3 






1886-1890 

1891 


97 

40 
19 
81 
46 
81 


.80 

.61 
.86 
.88 
.68 

.41 


84 

87 
15 
18 
86 
28 


18 

18 
4 
8 
9 
9 


56 

15 
10 
10 
84 
18 


41 

25 

9 

11 

81 

18 


6 
8 

1 
8 


6 
8 

8 
8 
8 


18 

4 

5 
5 


30 

10 
6 
7 

14 
5 


88 

24 
8 
12 
19 
13 


5 
2 


1892 


1 


1898 ^.... 

1894 


3 


1895 


8 






1891-1895 

1896 


156 
38 
671 


.46 
.51 
.42 


118 
88 
516 


38 

10 

155 


72 

20 
890 


84 

18 

281 


6 
8 
28 


9 

1 
48 


14 
8 
59 


48 
11 
185 


76 
20 
807 


9 
2 


Total, 31 years.. 


49 



* Exclusive of Providence city. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



1896.] CAUSES OP DEATH. 243 

WHOOPING COUGH. 

The Dumber of deaths from whooping cough, returned in 1896, was 
14 more than the number in 1895. 

Of the 59 decedents from whooping cough 25 were males, and 34 
were females. 

There were 24 decedents of native parentage and 35 of foreign, or a 
proportion of 69 of native to 100 of foreign. 

Fifty-seven of the decedents were under 5 years of age. 

The following Table will present the mortality from whooping cough, 
for thirty-one years, 1866-1896, inclusive, with the death rate, sex, 
parentage, etc., of the decedents: 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



244 



FORTY-FOURTH REGISTRATION REPORT. 



[1896. 



Table XCI. 
Morialikj in the State from Whooping Cough — 1866-1896, 



YEARS. 

5yeare,186C-18:0. 
1871-1OT5 



I ^ 



1876 

1877 

1878 

1879 

1880 

1876-1860. 



1881 

188ii 

1888 

1884 

1885 

1881-18a'i. 



1886 

1887 

1888 

1889 

1890 

1886-1890. 



1891 

1892 

1898 

1894 

1896 

1891-1895. 



Total, 81 years. 



54 
48 
SO 



197 ; 



I 



.88 



68 > l.S 



71 
9 
43 
42 

49 
21 
44 

77 
70 



261 



77 



23 



45 



59 
1,362 



1.40 
.17 
.88 
.79 
.90 

.83 

.82 

.75 

1.23 

1.00 



1.16 
.84 

,81 

1.80 

.60 



PARENTAGE. 



153 .90 ; 78 

160 .78 I 65 

I 
48 ; 1.17 

.72 

1.22 

.96 

.41 



19 


29 


18 


14 


26 


28 


17 


26 


10 


10 



112 


121 


28 


21 


9 


12 


17 


27 


39 


88 


25 


45 


118 


148 


39 


88 


10 


15 


8 


16 


52 


77 


19 


26 


128 


171 


25 


34 


616 


746 



-3 

a 



75 68 

95 64 

20 

SO 
22 



90 


107 

1 


88 


86 


83 


88, 


6 


3 


17 
98 


26 
10 



DIYISIONS OF THE STATE. 



85 



9C 



24 
21 
13 
112 



104 

37 
14 
9 
62 
13 



136 

24 
694 



88 
89 
4 

20 
IH 
119 

82 
11 
28 
41 
45 
157 

40 
11 
14 
67 



164 
85 



« 


Mo 


2 


IS 


4 


11 


5 


3 


. 


1 





11 


6 


16 




2 




4 


1 




5 






1 



« o 



27 



2o 






64 I 63 
56 . 73 



116 

40 
40 
4 

28 
24 



69 186 



82 184 



76 

16 
402 



152 

24 
698 






6 
43 



* Exclusive of Providence city. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



1896.] 



. CAUSES OF DEATH. 



245 



Table XCII. 

Presenting the ratio of Mortality to the Whole Number of Specified 

Causes of Deaths of twenty two Prominent Causes^ 

for twenty-one years, 1876-1896, 



CAUSES OF DEATH. 



Accidents (all kinds) . . . , 
Apoplexy and Paralysis. 

Brain, Diseases of 

Bronchitis 

Cancer 

Cholera Infantum 

Consumption 

Convulsions 

Croup 

Debility* 

DiarrhoBa 

Diphtheria 

Dysentery 

Fevers 

Heart, Diseases of , 

Whooping Cough 

Hydrocephalus 

Kidneys, Diseases of . . . 

Liver, Diseases of 

Old Age 

Pneumonia 

Scarlatina 

* Not infantile. 



YEARS. 



1876. 1877. 



8.40 
4.01 
3.64 
1.46 
2.72 
6.41 
16.78 
2.28 
2.61 
2.80 
1.87 
4.07 
1.28 
3.00 
4.03 
1.23 
1.74 
1.28 
1.15 
6.18 
8.69 
2.05 



3.10 
4.25 
8.68 
1.62 
817 
6.08 

15.52 
1.95 
2.23 
2.65 
2 11 

11.56 
1.22 
3.55 
4.28 
.75 
1.29 
1.57 
1.06 
5.00 
5.81 
1.46 



1878. 



4.45 
3.28 
1.89 
2.82 
3.97 

15.98 
2.65 
2.20 
1.91 
1.25 

10.28 

.95 

3.94 

3.92 

1.28 



1879. 



2.48 

5.21 
8.78 
1.47 
2 96 
3.81 
15.09 
2.47 
2.28 
2.35 
1.26 
6.14 
1.04 
2.70 
4.78 
1.02 



1.65 1.86 

1.80 ! 1.88 
1.06 1.17 



5 25 
7.49 
2.03 



5.22 
7.87 
7.37 



1880. 


1881. 


1882. 


3.51 


8.04 


3.44 


4 67 


5.23 


5.52 


8.44 


3.84 


8.60 


1.98 


1.80 


2.08 


2.72 


8.11 


2.75 


5.48 


5.15 


6.77 


1402 


15.12 


15.83 


2.88 


2.18 


2.29 


1.45 


2.16 


1.60 


3.09 


2.61 


2.69 


1.52 


1.65 


1.87 


8.40 


4.63 


2.10 


.61 


.90 


1.42 


3.37 


'8.05 


4.60 


5.08 


5.68 


5.81 


.44 


1.46 


1.48 


1.01 


1.20 


1.02 


2.02 


1.69 


1.79 


1.20 


.82 


1.21 


5.95 


5.29 


5.89 


7.90 


7.01 


;.16 


9.99 


2.96 


.94 



2.84 
5.89 
850 
2.04 
8.80 
4.73 
15.01 
2.47 
1.40 
1.14 
2.55 
1.88 
1.06 
5.12 
6.85 
.17 
.87 
2.48 



1884. 



8.80 

5.78 

2.97 

2.29 

3.03 

6.31 

14.34 

2.70 

1.55 

2.87 

2.20 

2.81 

.78 

8.24 

5.60 

.88 

.81 



5.22 5.68 

I 
7.84 I 7.14 



.64 



U 



1885. 



8.09 
5.38 
8.61 
8.09 
8.59 
5.16 
14.45 
2.06 
1.74 
2.45 
1.55 
1.83 

.68 
2.98 
6.48 

.79 

.81 
8.14 

.87 
4.95 
8.65 
1.70 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



246 



FORTY-FOURTH REGISTRATION REPORT. 

Table XCII— Continued. 



[1896. 







YEARS. 








1886. 


1887. 


1888. 


1889. 


1890. 


1891. 


1892. 


1898. 


1894. 


1895. 


1896. 


8.22 


8.25 


8.01 


8.46, 


8.60 


8.54 


4.18 


8.58 


8.29 


8.92 


8.96 


5.69 


4.17 


5,50 


5.17 


4.91 


508 


4.89 


5.52 


6.86 


5.57 


5.61 


8.11 


8.29 


8.43 


8.08 


8.18 


8.86 


8.88 


8.49 


8.11 


8,45 


4.00 


2.96 


2.77 


8.42 


4.80 


4.01 


8.74 


4.16 


4.24' 


8.57 


8.66 


3.69 


2.77 


2.50 


2.99 


8.08 

1 


2.41 


2.66 


2.46 


2.78 


8.01 


8.18 


8.02 


6.27 


5.60 


7.08 


6.80 


8.89 


8.85 


8.56 


8.18 


6.98 


6.68 


7.29 


14.12 


11.19 


12.18 


11.61 


12.29 


11.18 


10.26 


9.79 


9.98 


11.21 


11.82 


2.06 


2.51 


2.81 


8.17 


2.84 


1.97 


2.19 


2.05 


2.05 


1.60 


1.86 


1.55 


1.79 


1.19 


,.«8 


1.19 


1.01 


1.20 


.68 


.45 


.40 


.32 


2.91 


1.18 


1.88 


2.07 


1.98 


1.88 


1.72 


1.45 


.96 


1.12 


1.02 


1.59 


2.09 


1.20 


1.40 


1.87 


1.26 


1.78 


1.59 


1.17 


.80 


.78 


8.90 


4.58 


2.86 


8.96 


8.04 


154 


1.20 


8.18 


1.87 


4.54 


8.79 


1.18 


1.04 


1.11 


1.14 


1.25 


.89 


.96 


.57 


.57 


.55 


.41 


2.87 


8.00 


8.58 


8.29 


2.26 


2.87 


1.88 


1.61 


2.45 


2.20 


8.07 


6.20 


6.46 


6.56 


7.35 


5.84 


7.26 


6.84 


7.86 


6.70 


7.16 


7.44 


.88 


.82 


.75 


1.28 


1.00 


1.16 


.84 


.81 


1.82 


.60 


.79 


.41 


.41 


.47 


.20 


.87 


.84 


.80 


.42 


.17 


.21 


.28 


2.64 


2.66 


3.24 


3.88 


820 


8.71 


3.49 


4.10 


4.41 


4.56 


5.28 


1.08 


1.34 


1.19 


1.30 


.94 


2.28 


1.20 


.98 


1.81 


1.06 


1.47 


4.69 


' 488 


4.85 


8.68 


8.87 


2.80 


8.46 


2.48 


268 


2.63 


2.76 


8.18 


7.70 


7.62 


7.69 


820 


8.60 


8.85 


10.58 


9.86 


9.15 


8.95 


1.50 


4.20 


8.11 


.82 


.28 


.50 


.91 


8.62 


1.78 


1.43 


.71 



CAUSES OF DEATH. 

Accidents fall kinds) 

Apoplexy and Paralysis. 

Brain, Diseases of 

Bronchitis 

Cancer 

Cholera Infantam 

Consumption 

Conynlsions 

Croup 

Debility* 

Diarrhoea 

Diphtheria 

Dysentery 

Fevers 

Heart, Diseases of 

Whooping Cough 

Hydrocephalus 

Kidneys, Diseases of . . . . 

Liver, Diseases of 

Old Age 

Pneumonia 

Scarlatina 

* Not infantile. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



1896.] 



BIRTHS. 



247 



Table XCIII.-BIRTHS. 

Occupations of the Fathers, — 1896. 



OCCUPATIONS. 



Aorobats i 

Agents and Canvassers 

Architects 

Artesian Well Sinkers 

Artists 

Assayers and Analytical Chemists . 

Baggage Masters 

Bakers 

Ball Players 

Bankers and Brokers 

Bank Officeris 

Barbers 

Bartenders 

Beamers 

Belt Makers 

Bicycle 

Bobbin .'.. 

Boiler 

Bolt 

Box 

Brick 

Broom and Brush 

Cabinet 

Carriage, and Trimmers 

Chain 

Chandelier 

Cigar 

Clock and Watch 

Comb 

Gun 

Harness and Saddle 

Hoop 

Pattern 

Reed 

Sail 



1 

27 
5 
1 
4 
6 

11 

84 
1 

11 
4 

98 

46 
4 
4 
1 
9 

35 
7 
6 
4 
2 

14 
8 
1 
1 
4 
8 
2 
1 

24 
1 

17 
8 
4 



OCCUPATIONS. 



Sash and Blind Makers 

Soap , 

Shoe 

Spindle 

Spring Bed 

Tool 

Wringer 

Bill Posters 

Blacksmiths 

Bleachers and Fullers 

Boat Builders 

Boatmen 

Bookbinders. . . .' 

Bookkeepers 

Bootblacks 

Bottlers 

Brakemen 

Brewers 

Brick and Stone Layers 

Butchers and Marketmen 

Butlers 

Cab Drivers and Hackmen 

Calenderers 

Car Drivers, Conductors and Motormen 

Carders 

Card Grinders 

Carpenters 

Chasers 

Civil Engineers 

Clergymen , 

Clerks and Salesmen 

Clothiers 

Coachmen 

Coal and Wood Dealers 

Dry Goods 



1 
1 

62 
1 
2 

14 

7 

1 

184 

28 
4 
1 
1 



7 
83 
18 
19 



11 

1 

71 

24 

7 

578 

7 

8 

28 

295 

7 

46 

10 

5 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



248 



FORTY-FOURTH REGISTRATION REPORT. 

Table XCIII.— CoDtiDued. 



[1896. 



OCCUPATIONS. 



B 

9 
;Z5 



OCCUPATIONS. 



Fish and Oyster Dealers S 

Furniture 4 

Grain 8 

Granite 2 

Hardware 7 

loe 4 

Junk 7 

Liquor 47 

Lumber I 

Music 1 

News 2 

Oil 8 

Provision 6 

Soap 1 

Shoe 15 

Collectors 18 

Commercial Travelers 41 

Concreters 5 

Confectioners 15 

Contractors and Builders 21 

Cooks and Caterers 28 

Coopers 12 

Coppersmiths 8 

Cutters 1 

Cutters (Velvet) 1 

Decorators 3 

Dentists 8 

Desi^ers 9 

Detectives 1 

Die Cutters 3 

Die Sinkers 6 

Draughtsmen 12 

Drivers 48 

Druggists and Apothecaries , 18 

Dyers T I 63 

Electricians 87 

Electrotyper | 1 



Elevator-man 

Enamelers 

Engineers and Firemen 

Engravers 

Expressmen 

Farmers 

File Cutters 

Finishers 

Brass 

Fire Company Members 

Fishermen and Oystermen 

Flagmen, Railroad 

Florists 

Foundrymen 

, Fruiterers 

Furnacemen and Puddlers 

Furniture Movers 

Gardeners 

j Gas Fitters 

Grocers 

I Grooms 

Hatters ,... 

Horse Dealers 

I Horse Trainers 

Hostlers 

Hotel and Inn Keepers 

Saloon and Restaurant 

House Movers 

Icemen 

Inspectors 

Insurance Agents 

Real Estate 

Iron Rollers and Workers 

Janitors 

i Jewelers 

Jobbers 

Journalists (Editors and Reporters) 



1 

8 

183 

16 



21 
6 

15 

30 
5 

15 
3 

13 
4 
1 

60 
6 
100 
1 
1 
1 

*1 

38 
5 

48 
5 



46 

6 

13 

81 

203 

2 

21 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



1896.] 



BIRTHS. 

Table XCIII.— Continued. 



249 



OCCUPATIONS. 



Laborers 

Lapidaries 

Lathers 

Laundrymen 

Lawyers 

Lighthouse Keepers 

Life Saving Service Men 

Linemen 

Locksmiths 

Longshoremen 

Lumbermen 

Machinists 

Mail Carriers 

Manufacturers 

Mariners 

Masons 

Mechanics 

Melters 

Merchants , 

Milkmen 

Millers , 

Moulders , 

Musicians 

Nurses 

Operatives 

Opticians 

Painters and Glaziers 

Pantographers 

Paper Hangers 

Pavers 

Pearl Workers 

Peddlers 

Photographers and Lithographers. 

Physicians 

Plasterers and Stucco Workers. . . . 

Platers 

Electro 



i 



5 

4 < 
9 

10 

1 

2 
12 , 

1 
18 

4 
583 
14 , 
40 I 

129 



OCCUPATIONS. 



i: 



Platers, Gold 

Plumbers 

Polishers 

Silver 

Pork & Meat Cutters & Pork Packers. . 

Porters 

Postmasters 

Printers 

Public Officers 

Publishers 

Railroad Officials 

Refiners 

Gold 

Riggers 

Roll Coverers 

Roofers 



I a 

a 

2 

.' 78 

82 

1 

16 
20 
2 
89 
5 
1 

17 
4 
8 



25 ! Rubber Workers , 98 



85 , 
25 

6', 
102 ' 
20 
1 ' 
1112 
1 
237 ' 
5 
11 
5 
138 
1 

11 I 
16 
19 
4 
6 



Sailors 

Sculptors 

Sea Captains 

Seine Mender 

Servants 

Sextons 

Shell Workers 

Sheriffs, Constables and Policemen , 

Ship Carpenters 

Silversmiths 

Slaters 

Soldiers , 

Stable Keepers 

Steam Pipers 20 

Stereotypers 4 

I 
Stevedores 6 

Stewards ' 8 

Stone Cutters and Marble Workers ! 92 

Store Keepers 81 

Students 



14 
2 
4 
1 
4 
8 
2 

46 
6 

50 
4 

14 

10 



81 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



250 FORTY-FOURTH REGISTRATION REPORT. 

Table XCIII.— CoDtiDiied. 



[1896. 



OCCUPATIONS. 



Surveyors , 

Surveyors, Highway 

Superintendents and Overseers 

Switchmen 

Tailors 

Tanners and Curriers 

Taxidermists 

Teachers and Professors 

Teamsters 

Telephone and Telegraph Operators 

Ticket Agent 

Tinsmiths 

Traders 

Treasurers 



I 



OCCUPATIONS. 



ll 



Typewriters 

Undertakers 

119 ! I Upholsterers 

I Veterinary Surgeons. 

I Waiters 

I Watchmen 

Wheelwrights 

White washers 

Wire Workers 

Wood Carvers 

Wood Finishers 

Wood Turners 

li 
1 I Wool Sorters. 

4 



86 
9 
1 

81 

898 

9 

1 

84 



2 

9 

19 

1 

20 

84 

12 

2 

1 

1 

2 

17 

17 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



1896.] 



MARRIAGES. 



251 



Table XCIV.— MARRIAGES. 

Occupations of the Grooins, — 1806. 



OCCUPATIONS. 



Actors 

Agents and Canyassers 

Architects 

Artesian Well Drillers 

Army Officers 

Artists 

Baggage Masters 

Bakers 

Bankers and Brokers 

Bank Officers 

Barbers .' 

Bartenders 

Baseball Players 

Belt Makers 

Bobbin 

Boiler 

Bolt 

Box 

Brick 

Broom and Brush 

Button 

Cabinet , 

Carriage, and Trimmers.. 

Cigar 

Clock and Watch 

Comb 

PUe 

Glue 

Gun 

Harness and Saddle 

Hat 

Nail 

Paper 

Pattern 

Piano and Organ 




4 
26 

5 

8 

38 
24 

1 

1 

5 

3 

2 

5 

3 

2l 

8 I 

3 

4 

2 

2 

1 I 

1 

1 



i! 

8 



Rope Makers 

Sail 

Screw 

Shoe 

Spring 

Tool 

Wringer 

Billposters 

Blacksmiths 

Bleachers and Fullers 

Boatmen 

Bookkeepers 

Bottlers , 

Brakemen 

Brewers 

Brick and Stone Layers 

Butchers and Marketmen 

Butlers 

Cab Drivers and Hackmen 

Car Drivers, Conductors and Motormen 

Carders 

Card Grinders 

Carpenters 

Chasers 

Chemical Engineer 

Chemists 

Civil Engineers 

Clergymen 

Clerks and Salesmen 

Coachmen 

Coal and Wood Dealers 

Dry Goods 

Fish and Oyster 

Furniture 

Hardware 



1 
1 
7 

14 
1 

10 
8 
1 

35 

12 
1 

39 
5 

11 
6 

12 

85 
2 
5 

36 
6 
3 
144 
5 
1 
8 
5 

12 
266 

27 
4 
2 
1 
1 
1 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



252 



FORTY-FOURTH REGISTRATION REPORT. 

Table XCIV.— CoDtinued. 



[1896. 



OCCUPATIONS. 



Horse Dealers 

loe 

Junk. 

Liquor 

Lumber 

News 

Paper 

Poultry 

Provision 

Shoe 

Clothiers 

Collectors 

Commercial Travelers 

Confectioners 

Contractors and Builders. . . , 

Cooks and Caterers 

Coopers 

Coppersmiths 

Cutters 

Decorators 

Dentists 

Designers 

Die Sinkers: 

Divers 

Draughtsmen 

Drivers 

Druggists and Apothecaries. 

Dyers 

Electrical Engineers 

Electricians 

Elevator-man 

Enamelers 

Engineers and Firemen 

Engravers 

Expressmen 

Farmers 

File Cutters 



OCCUPATIONS. 



2 I 

2J 

2 ' 

9 

2 

1 

2 

1 

6 

1 

2 

7 
20 

8 
10 
12 

4 

2 

2 

8 

2 

4 

2 

1 

8 
16 
12 
10 

1 
28 

1 

1 
58 



Finishers 

Brass 

Fish Culturists 

Fishermen and Oystermen. , 
Fire Company Members. . . . 

Florists 

Folders. 

Foundrymen 

Fruiterers 

Furniture Movers 

Gardeners 

Gas Fitters 

Grocers 

Grooms 

Hatters 

Hostlers 

Hotel and Inn Keepers 

Saloon and Restaurant. . 

Icemen 

Inspectors 

Insurance Agents 

Iron Workers 

Janitors. 

Jewelers. 

Jobbers. 

Journalists (Editors and Reporters). . . . 

Laborers. 

Lapidaries. 

Lathers. 

Laundrymen. 

Lav^ryers. 

Life Saving Service Men. 

Lighthouse Keepers. 

Linemen. 

Longshoremen. 

Lumbermen. 



7 

1 

2 
18 

6 
11 

1 
10 

1 

1 
16 

8 
89 

2 

2 
29 

5 
15 

2 
10 

5 




Digitized by VjOOQIC 



]896.] 



MARRIAGES. 

Table XCIV.— Continued. 



253 



OCCUPATIONS. 



Mail Carriers 

Manufacturers 

Mariners 

Masons 

Mechanics 

Merchants 

Milkmen 

Millers 

Moulders 

Musicians 

Nurses 

Operatives 

Opticians 

Painters and Glaziers 

Paper Hangers 

Pavers 

Pearl Workers 

Peddlers 

Photographers and Lithographers 

Physicians 

Piano Tuners 

Pilots 

Planters 

Platers 

Electro 

Gold 

Plasterers and Stucco Workers 

Plumbers 

Polishers 

Silver 

Pork and Meat Cutters & Pork Packers. 

Porters 

Pressmen 

Printers 

Proof Readers 

Public Officers 

Public Speakers 



OCCUPATIONS, 



Publishers 

Quarrymen 

Railroad Officials 

Riggers 

Roll Coverers 

Ropers 

Rubber Workers 

Sailors 

Sea Captains and Ship Masters 

Servants >. , 

Sheriffs, Constables, and Policemen 

Ship Builders 

Silversmiths , 

Slaters 

Smelters 

Soldiers , 

Stable Keepers 

Station Agents , 

Steam Pipers , 

Stenographers 

Stereotypers 

Stevedores 

Stewards 

Stone Cutters and Marble Workers. . 

Store Keepers 

Stove Mounters 

Students 

Superintendents and Overseers 

Switchmen 

Tailors 

Tanners and Curriers 

Teachers and Professors 

Teamsters 

Telephone and Telegraph Operators. 

Tinsmiths 

Theatrical Managers 

Tobacconists 



a 

1 
6 

13 
8 
4 
1 

19 
9 
4 
3 

10 
1 

27 
2 
2 
3 
7 
2 

10 
1 
1 
8 
7 

13 
6 
1 
7 

27 
4 

19 
2 

11 
105 
S 
7 
1 
5 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



254 



FORTY-FOURTH REGISTRATION REPORT. 

Table XCIV.-ContiDued. 



[1896. 



OCCUPATIONS. 



Traders 

Treasurers 

Typewriters , 

Upholsterers 

Veterinary Surgeons 



I 



OCCUPATIONS. 



Waiters 

Watchmen 

Wheelwrights. 
Wood Turners 
Wool Sorters.. 



a 

9 

14 
8 
8 

10 
6 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



1896.] 



DEATHS BY OCCUPATION. 



255 



Table XCV. 

Occupations and Ages of Decedents from June 1, 1852, to January 

i, 1897, comprising a period of Forty-four years and seven 

months. Occupations under Ten, and Ages 

under Ihventy, excluded. 



OCCUPATIONS. 



Males. 

Actors 

Agrents 

Architects 

Artists 

Bakers 

Bankers and Brokers 

Bank Officers 

Barbers 

Bartenders 

Belt Makers 

Boiler 

Box 

Broom and Brash 

Cabinet 

Carriage, & Trimmers. 

Cigar 

Harness 

Pattern 

Pump and Block 

Rope 

Sail 

Shoe 

Tool 

Watch and Clock 

Bookbinders 

Bookkeepers 

Brakemen 

Brewers 

Brick and Stone Layers . . . 
Butchers and Marketmen. 
Calico Printers 



1 


1 


12 


418 


2SS0 


11,536 


13 


778 


85 


1,765 


189 


9,585 


187 


8,082 


68 


4,047 


282 


7,887 


40 


1,506 


10 


667 


70 


2,886 


17 


741 


15 


743 


127 


7,832 


71 


8,865 


100 


4,446 


115 


5,681 


74 


4,826 


14 


788 


25 


1,672 


35 


2,046 


587 


33,908 


21 


1,128 


83 


1,889 


26 


1,203 


887 


17,191 


106 


8,068 


19 


948 


13 


611 


275 


14,084 


57 


8,106 



84.42 
52.43 
59.61 
60.14 
68.60 
58.99 
64.27 
88.78 
87.65 
56.70 
41.23 
43.59 
49.58 
57.73 
54.29j 
44.46; 
49.40| 
68.46; 




Calkers 

Carpenters and Joiners. 

Chasers 

Civil Engineers 

Clerks and Salesmen.,. . 

Clergymen 

Clothiers 

Coachmen 

Coal and Wood Dealers. 

Fish and Oyster 

Junk 

Liquor 

Lumber 

Provision 

Collectors 

Confectioners 

Contractors & Builders. 
Cooks and Caterers 



55. 71 1, Coopers 

66.88 Coppersmiths. 



Decorators... 

Dentists , 

Designers.... 
Die Sinkers.. 
Draughtsmen 
Drivers 

Cab, etc., 

[ir, Coni 

and Motormen 



58.45 
57^76' 
68.48 
55,73 
46.27 
44.42 
28.94 
49.89 
47.00 
61.2r 



64.49 Dyers. 



Car, Conductors I 



Druggists and Apothe- 



12, 

I 

1,993 

isl 

I 

48| 

1.1391 

i 
12 

179 
11 
19 
18 

118 
12 
17 
20 
41 
99 
88 

126 
12 
11 
38 
20 
21 
12 
84 
46 
82 



873 72.75 

110,892 55.89 

498 87.92 

2,405' 50.10 

42,794' 87.67 

15,021 68.92 

695 57.92 

7,740 48.24 

609 55.86 

1,153 60.68 

I 

714 54.92 

5,122 45.83 
I 

665 65.42 

940 65.29 

1,185; 59.26 

1,874 I 45.71 

5,77o| 58.28 

4,101 47.28 

I 

8,318, 65.98 

736 61.83 

422 88.35 

2,004 52.74 

1,002! 50.10 

1,016 48.38 

880 31.67 



1,294 



88.06 



1,985 43.15 

I 
1,192 37.25 

7,528| 76.04 
I I 

125 6,880, 50.64 



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256 



FORTY-FOURTH REGISTRATION REPORT. 



[1896. 



Table XCV.— CoDtiDUed. 



OCCUPATIONS. 



Engineers and Firemen... . 

EngraYers 

Expressmen 

Farmers 

File Cutters 

Nail 

Finishers 

Fishermen andOystermen. 

Florists 

Founders..., 

Foundrymen 

Gardeners 

Gas Fitters 

Gilders 

Grocers 

Gun and Locksmiths 

Hatters 

Hostlers 

Hotel and Inn Keepers... . 

Saloon and Restaurant 

Stable 

Store 

Inspectors 

Inventors 

Iron Rollers and Workers. 
Janitors 

Jewelers 

Journalists, Editors and I 
Reporters f 

Judges and Justices 

Laborers 

Lamplighters 

Lapidaries 

Laundrymen 

Lawyers 

Machinists 



< 
I 



889 

132 

96 

6,528' 

85 

12 

16, 

285| 

5s' 

18 

11 

270 

56 

11 

422 

24 

25 

123 

162 

187, 

77| 

20 

I 

lo; 

14 

11 

76 

I 

996 

87j 

15| 

9,643| 

17 

11 

le' 

163] 
1,500 



I 



18,669 

6,812 

4,815' 

486,845 

8,462! 

490' 

7721 

11,985 

2,906 

858 

680 

16,877 

2.401 

449 

22,790| 

1,814 

1,864 

5,806 

8,798, 

8,6091 

6,906 

1,061 

503 

906' 

508 

8,913' 

41,198 

1,675 

9811 

I 

476,779, 

916| 

862 

671 

9,118 

72,572 



gj OCCUPATIONS. 

i ■ 

47.97 MaU Carriers 

47.82 Manofacturers 

50.16 Mariners 

66.97 , Masons 

70.78 JMechanics 

40.88 Merchants 

48.25 Milkmen 

51. OOJ I Millers 

64.88 Millwrights 

I 
47.89. Miners 

57.27 Moulders 

I 
58.80, 'Musicians 

42. 87i Naval Officers 

40.82 Nurses 

54.00' Operatives 

54 .75 Painters and Glaziers. . . 

54.56 Paper Hangers 

48.141 1 Peddlers 

R. q- Photographers and ( 
^ -^^ , Lithographers f 

46.04 Physicians 

88.18 .Pilots 

58 . 05 ' Plasterers, etc 

50.80 ; Plumbers 

64.71 Polishers 

AH iu Pork and Meat Cutters I 
^^ • ^"1 ; and Pork Packers . . . f 

51.49 'Porters 

41. 30 Printers 

45.27 Public Officers 

Il 
65 . 40 Railroad Officials 

49.44 Refiners 

53. 88 1 Riggers 

32.91 iRoU Coverers 

I 

41.81 1 Rubber Workers 

55.94 I Sailors 

48.38 I Sea. Captains 



^ 

^ 


il 

! 1 

< 


< 


1 


< 


12 


590 


44.17 


594 


86,058| 60.69 


529 


26,878 49.85 


880 


47,839' 57.68 


474 


25,199| 53.16 


1,224 


71,760 


58.68 


14 


865 


40.85 


45 


2,664 


59.20 


86 


2,847 


67.06 


15 


886 


55.80 


816 


14,587 


46.15 


68 


8,181 


46.78 


19 


9^1 


49.58 


14 


743 


58.07 


2,848 


102,478 


48.74 


847 


40,552 


47.38 


22 


1,169 


53.14 


167 


8,276 


49.55 


24 


1,098 


45.75 


306 


18,389 


59.93 


21 


1,159 


55.19 


51 


2,420 


47.45 


97 


8,864 


39.83 


27 


1,289 


45.89 


15 


684 


45.60 


46 


2,169 


47.15 


189 


11,008 


58.22 


83 


5,017 


60.45 


91 


4,164 


45.76 


14 


624 


44.57 


22 


1,254 


57.00 


82 


1,852 


57.87 


151 


6,346 


42,03 


262 


12,541 


47.87 


175 


11,737 


07.07 



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1896.] 



DEATHS BY OCCUPATION. 

Table XCV.— Concluded. 



257 



occupations. 



Servants 

Sheriffs, etc 

Ship Carpenters 

Silversmiths 

Soldiers 

Stevedores 

Stev?ards 

Stone-cutters, etc 

Students 

Superintendents, etc 

Switchmen, Gatemen. etc. 

Tailors 

Tanners and Curriers. .... 
Teachers and Professors. . 

Teamsters 

Telephone and Tele- I 
graph Operators f 

Tinsmiths 

Tobacconists 

Traders 

Tradesmen, General 

Undertakers 

Upholsterers 

Waiters 

Watchmen 

Wheelwrights 



25 
122 

77 
113 
142 

16 

19 
263 

78 
29 

1 
409 

48 
138! 
579 

24 
119 

13 
282 
185 

44 

51 
119 
159 
103 






^ 



1,121 

6,757 

5,336 

5,071 

4,387 

766 

834 

13,239 

1,771 

16,325 

921 

22,483 

2,975 

6,7:>8 

27,040 

731 

5,474 

767 

14,188 

8,919 

2,557 

2,059 

4,865 1 



OCCUPATIONS. 



1.24 

6,287, 60.55 

I I 



Wire Workers 

Wood Turners 

Wool Sorters 

Total 

Females. 
Boarding-house Keepers 

Bookkeepers 

Clerks and Saleswomen. 

Cooks : 

Dressmakers and ) 
Seamstresses f 

Jewelers 

Laboring 

Laundresses 

Milliners 

Nurses 

Operatives 

Physicians 

Rubber Workers 

Servants 

Sisters of Mercy 

Tailoresses 

Teachers 

Total 

Grand Total 





i 

< 
< 


11 


513 


42 


1,651 


53 


2,492 


41,903 


2,211,724 


24 


1,519 


13 


379 


29 


836 


44 


2,361 


351 


14,277 


14 


376 


16 


699 


40 


1,H38 


56 


2,005 


105 


6,325 


974 


30,600 


11 


647 


19 


554 


526 


25.*',r>i. 


30 


1,189 


147 


6,787 


221 


11,299 


2,620 


107,100 


44,523 


2,318,824 



bD 



46.64 
39.31 
47.02 

52.78 

63.29 
29.15 
28.83 
58.66 
40.67 
26.86 
49.00 
48.45 
35.80 
60.24 
31.42 
58.82 
29.16 
48.21 
37.96 
46.17 
51.13 

40.88 

52.08 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



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1896.] 



CAUSES OP DEATH. 



259 



I 



00 






s 



CO ^ 






I 

Si 



r 

•s 

s 

•^ 

;§ 
fe^ 



^ 
"•^ 






.§* 



s 



s 



tttTT 




•s 

1 

2 



I a 



§ 2 
O O 



f ft 



EE4 I^ 



•a 

3 ^ 



•a «« w 5 

s I a § 



Digitized by 



1 1 1 

Goog 



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THE RETURNS OF THE MEDICAL EXAMINERS. 



The number of deaths investigated by the medical examiners during 
the year 1896 was 326. These deaths resulted from sudden, suspicious, 
unknown, and violent causes. Of this number 254, or 77.9 per cent., 
were males, and 72, or 22.1 per cent., were females. Ninety out of 
the 326 were found upon inquiry and examination to be non-medico 
legal cases. 

Homicide.— There was only one case known to be one of homicide in 
1896. In this case the victim's throat was cut from ear to larynx with 
a razor. The assailant escaped. 

Suicide — The number of deaths by suicide reported by the medical 
examiners in 1896 was 27, or'8.3 percent, of the whole number ex- 
amined. 

Accidents — The returns of the medical examiners show 177 deaths 
from accidents, specified as follows : Asphyxia, 17; bicycle and team 
collision, 1 ; blasting rock (premature discharge), 1 ; from two boiler 
explosions, 7 ; burns and scalds, 5 ; by caving of sand bank, I ; in 
clay pit, 1 ; drowning, "32 ; electric car, 5 ; electrical shock and burns, 
6 ; elevator, 2 ; excessive heat, 20 ; exposure while intoxicated, 1 ; 
falls, 19 ; from neglect, 5 ; nitrous oxide gas (in dentist's chair), 2, 83 
and 57 years ; machinery, 4 ; fractured skull (motorman) in row with 
unruly passenger, 1 ; by poisoning, 3 ; quarry accident, crushed by 
stone, 1 ; by discharge of revolver, 1 ; railroad, 34 ; thrown from car- 
riage (runaway horses), 2; run over by heavy teams, 4; suffocated 
while intoxicated, 2. 

Asphyxia — 6 by illuminating gas ; 1 by gas in cesspool (was over- 
come by sewer gas which had not been cleared away before attempting 
to descend into cesspool for the purpose of cleaning it) ; 3 by smoke 
in burning building ; 7 (infants) by bed clothes and overlaying (four of 
these were Saturday and holiday night casualties). 



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262 FORTY-FOURTH REGISTRATION REPORT. [1896. 

Burns and Scalds. — 1 by steam on tugboat by blowing out of tube ; 
1 in burning tenement house ; 1 by upset kerosene lamp (72 years, and 
was alone in house) ; 1 from brush fire (found burned to a crisp at fire 
which he was tending) ; 1 by clothes taking fire from stove. 

Drowning. — 7 were bathing or swimming ; 2 were drowned from 
small boats ; 5 were skating or sliding on ice which broke through ; 1 
(7 years) fell from bridge ; 1 fell into well (female, 55 years) ; 1 (78 
years) fell from wharf; 3 fell into water while intoxicated ; 12 were 
found in water, circumstances of drowning not known. 

Electric Car — Run over by electric car (32 years), 1 ; struck by 
electric car (8, 36 and 50 years), 3. 

Electrical Shock and Burns. — Shop casualty at engine works, 1 
roof casualty, 1 ; from broken electric light wire hanging down, 1 ; 
shock and fall from telephone pole (lineman), 1 ; from crossed wires 
(father and son), 2. 

Elevator — Caught between elevator and floor, 1 (a lad at St. 
Joseph's Hospital who was looking down the elevator well from win- 
dow looking into it, descending car struck him breaking his neck) ; 
crushed by elevator, 1 (a lad of 16 years, not known how it happened, 
it was in a large dry goods store and after hours, he was probably try- 
ing to run the elevator). 

Falls — From elevator car (riding on the foot-board and rear plat- 
form of car), 2 ; from buildings while at work, 4 ; from a bridge while 
intoxicated, 1 ; down park bank, 1 ; down stairs, 6 ; from a team, 1 ; 
from a tree (picking apples), 1 ; from window, 3. 

Machinery. — Caught between drums at dye works, I ; coat caught 
in gear of engine at Narr. Imp. Co.'s works, 1 ; in factory, 2. 

Poison 1 by overdose of chloral taken after a spree ; 1 by lauda- 
num taken while intoxicated ; 1 by oil of tansy taken to procure abor- 
tion. 

Run Over by Street Teams. — Crushed by wheel of heavy team (la- 
borer), 1 : by truck or low gear (children), 2 ; by wagon loaded with 
stone (26 years), 1. 

The following cases are deemed worthy of special mention : 

Deaths From Boiler Explosions. — A boiler explosion occurred at 
Kent Woolen Mills, Cenlreville, R. I., December 19, 1896, by which 



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1896.] RETURNS OF MEDICAL EXAMINERS. 263 

five men lost their lives. Tbe cause of the explosion is still a mystery. 
The insurance experts found that the safety plug had not been burned 
out and was nninjured, proving conclusively that the explosion was not 
due to the water having become exhausted. Three men were killed in- 
stantly, one died eight hours after and one three days later. On Feb- 
ruary 10, 1896, one of the boilers in the "Ann and Hope" Mill at 
Lonsdale, exploded, and as a result two firemen were killed. 

Burns, Manner Unknown — A. singular fatality occurred in New- 
port, R. I., December 19, 1896, by which three sisters lost their lives 
in their own home. It is supposed by some that the clothes of one of 
the women caught fire from burning alcohol, and that the other two lost 
their lives in trying to extinguish the flames. The victims were 83, 86, 
and 90 years old, and lived together alone. The house was not burned. 

Deaths by Electricity. — A moulder at Corliss Steam Engine Works, 
on February 6, 1896, was shocked to death in a peculiar manner. He 
was handling a large crane worked by electric power. This crane is a 
large structure used for lifting heavy weights such as heavy castings, 
etc. The electricity is furnished by the Narragansett Electric Light Co., 
and is on a different circuit from that furnished the electric lights. The 
wires enter the foundry through the roof and run down the iron pillar 
which is the upright of the crane. The switch-board is placed on the side 
of this upright, so that the power can be turned whenever the crane is to 
be used. The men, at different times while working the crane, have 
felt slights shocks on taking hold of the iron chain which hangs on the 
end of the cross-piece and is used to swing it around. On this partic- 
ular day, on account of the wet weather, the shocks were much stronger. 
One of the helpers took hold of the chain with both hands and was un- 
able to let go. He shouted to his companions, but not until the elec- 
tricity had been shut off was he released. After this the foreman 
warned the men to be careful, and a rope was attached to the crane, but 
the chain was left hanging there. When *' pouring off " was over, the 
moulder wished to move a large mould filled with the metal which had 
cooled. The mould was lying behind the crane on one side. He step- 
ped part way up on a pile of moulding sand, and taking hold of the 
chain attempted to swing the crane around. He had hold of it but a 
few seconds when he was seen to hold up his hand and drop to the 
ground. Every effort was made to resuscitate tbe man but it was of 
no use, he was dead. It was not thought that the wires contained a 
sufficient number of volts to kill a man. His death might have been 
caused by heart disease, although he always appeared to be a very 
healthy man. 



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264 



FORTY-FOURTH REGISTRATION REPORT. 



[1896. 



By Falling Down Park Bank On December 6, 1896, a man 

started out on his customary Sunday stroll. In Davis park he at- 
tempted to pass along a narrow path on the side of the hill. Thaw- 
ing frost formed a slippery layer of mud, and he lost his footing and 
slid the full length of the steep incline, and was dashed against a tree 
and instantly killed. 

The whole number of deaths by accident in the State during 1896 
were 296, showing that there were 119 deaths by accident where no 
medical examiner was called. In these cases a physician had been in 
attendance and had reported the cause of death. In many instances 
the death was not immediate. 

The division of these 296 deaths by accident was as follows : (See 
pages 18, 19 of this report.) Asphyxia, 21 ; bicycle, 2 ; blasting rock, 
1 ; boiler explosion, 7 ; burns, 25 ; drowning, 39 ; electric car^ 6 ; ele- 
vator, 2; exposure, 4; falls, 48; firearms, 2; insolation, 47; machin- 
ery, 5; overdose of medicine, 4; poison, 8; railroad, 36; surgical 
operations, 3 ; other and various, 33. (See page 180 of this report.) 

A comparison of these figures with the cases of accidents which are 
viewed by the medical examiners will show the cases which are more 
0[)en to suspicion of avoidable violence. The difference (29) is moie 
marked under the cause of falls. 

Other sudden deaths which were investigated by medical examiners 
were as follows: From alcoholism, 5; apoplexy, 8; cerebral conges- 
tion, 1 ; cholera infantum, I ; congestive chill, 2 ; convulsions, 1 ; 
epileptic attack, 2 ; heart disease, 39 ; indigestion, 2 ; grippe, 1 ; mal- 
nutrition, 1; marasmus, 3; nephritis, 6; pneumonia, 5 ; pulmonary 
tuberculosis, 5 ; pulmonary hemorrhage, 4 ; pulmonary oedema, 1 ; old 
age (heart failure), 2 ; umbilical hemorrhage, 1; attempted abortion, 
1 ; stillborn and unknown causes, 30. 

Number and Per cent, of Each Group of Cases Viewed by 
Medical Examiners— 189 Jf- 1896. 



YEARS. 


Homicide. 








Number. 


Per cent. 


1894 


9 
6 


3.1 


1895 


1.7 


1896 


1 


0.3 







Suicide. 



a 



81 
27 



8.5 
8.3 



Accident 


or 


Negligence. 


u 


+j 


V 




^ 


o 


s 




fe 


125 


A. 


1 ''' 


49.0 


! 223 


61.4 


1 177 


54.3 



Natural and 
Unknown Causes, 
Including Alcohol- 
ism. 






103 
121 



32.3 
28.4 
87.1 



826 



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APPENDIX A. 



NOMENCLATURE OF DISEASES, 



. CAUSES OF DEATH, 



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Digitized by VjOOQIC 



NAMES OF CAUSES OF DEATH. 



It should be stated that the nomenclature of diseases in the nosolog- 
ical arrangement on the following pages is not intended to include the 
names of the whole list of morbid phenomena affecting the human or- 
ganism, but the names of such only as are directly the cause of death, 
or such as ordinarily predispose to or set in motion the morbid pro- 
cesses that end in death. 

The classification which has appeared in the previous issues of this 
report, and which was the result of a report of the committee of the 
Royal College of Physicians of England, has been modified to accord 
with the changes which have taken place in our knowledge of the 
pathological causation of diseases since that classification was made. 

The changes which have been made apply more especially to Group 
One, the title of which has been changed from Miasmatic to Communi- 
cable, and has absorbed all of Group Two, which was known as the 
Enthetic group. This included glanders, gonorrhoea, hydrophobia, 
malignant pustule, septicaemia, and syphilis, all of which are at the 
present day considered as communicable diseases, and probably de- 
pendent upon a morbific entity which in some of these diseases has 
been demonstrated. 

In Group Two delirium tremens has been dropped to the supplemen- 
tary list, being but a symptom or a result of the condition of alcohol- 
ism, which, while not strictly correct, is yet more comprehensive in cov- 
ering this class of causations. As the report has never had a death 
from opium habit to record, this is dropped as a causative factor. 

Apthae, worms an^ other parasites should be classed as communica- 
ble, the parasites being of a higher order than those producing diph- 
theria and cholera, and are dropped from this class. 

As dropsy is a result or symptom rather than an immediate cause of 
death it has been left out. 

Gangrene, occurring in old age, has been transferred to the group 
Developmental Diseases of Old Age. Other conditions where gangrene 
is found have been traced satisfactorily to traumatisms or diseases of 
the circulatory system. 



Digitized by VjOOQIC 



268 APPENDIX. 

Id Class III, in the group of Diseases of the Nervous System, cepha- 
litis has been dropped as being obsolete. Convulsions has been trans- 
ferred to the group of Developmental Diseases of Children, all such 
deaths having been found to be within these age periods. 

From the group of the Respiratory System pneumonia has been trans- 
ferred to the list of Communicable diseases. 

In Group Four, of the Digestive System, appendicitis has been in- 
troduced as being a sufficiently distinct and frequent disease, and con- 
cerning which statisticians will desire information as to the mortality 
therefrom. Peritonitis, being a sequel of a traumatic or a septic con- 
dition, is usually traceable to a primary cause if inquired into. When 
no specific cause is obtainable it is placed under causes ill-defined. 
Ascites, being a secondary cause, is relegated to causes ill-defined, un- 
less the original cause of the ascites can be ascertained. Hernia is re- 
tained in this group, rather than in the group of Accidents and Negli- 
gence. Other new diseases which are introduced into this group as 
being now more specifically diagnosticated, are obstruction of the bow- 
els, colitis, entero colitis, diarrhoea, dysentery, gastro enteritis, and 
gallstones — which is retained for want of a more definite term which 
shall express the conditions causing the formation of the gallstones — 
and acute gastritis. 

Under diseases of the Urinary System, the word nephria is omitted, 
the term Bright's Disease being retained in the absence of the ability 
or practicability of the ordinary diagnostician to be able to distinguish 
the different forms of nephritis or blood changes or other causes giving 
rise to the presence of albumen in the urine. Diabetes is divided into 
the two forms of mellitus and insipidus. While perhaps belonging to 
the group of nervous diseases, yet it is not yet sufficiently well ex- 
plained to prove in which group it might be placed, and custom in this 
case is allowed to prevail. Diseases of the testicles has been omitted 
as it has, by experience in this department, been found to be dependent 
upon some pathological change, such as neoplastic formations or trau- 
matic or septic conditions, and the primary cause usually finds its way 
into these groups. Uraemia is placed in the primary group as being ex- 
pressive of the direct location of the disease, although not being specific 
as to the causation. 

Under diseases of the Generative System we are at the present day , 
able to specify more accurately the condition present, owing to the in- 
creased knowledge required of the gynecologist. Ovarian dropsy is 
therefore dropped, and ovarian tumor, diseases of the uterus, and pyo- 
salpinx are submitted as sub-divisions. This group will probably be 
enlarged as physicians become better educated in specific diagnosis in 
this special department. 



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APPENDIX. 269 

As still births are classified by themselves they are removed from the 
group of Developmental Diseases of Children. To this group has been 
added atelectasis pulmonum, also cholera infantum. Convulsions is 
allowed to remain. Although every effort is made to ascertain the 
cause of this symptom, and it is frequently dependent upon intestinal 
disturbances as well as nervous derangements, yet it is impossible for 
the physician to ascertain the provoking cause. As it is not suflficiently 
'' ill-defined " to be relegated to that group, being a disease of child- 
hood, it is placed in this group. 

Under Developmental Diseases of Women the various sub-divisions 
of the causes of death in childbirth have been given and an eflfort made 
to obtain these special causes rather than let them remain as simply 
" childbirth." 

Diseases of Nutrition are omitted, as atrophy or debility is found to 
be either in the group of old age, or diseases of infants, or caused by 
some disease which can be ascertained. If the cause is not evident to 
the physician, it is evidently a cause unknown, and should be classed 
as such. 

Under the group, Accident or Negligence, the term fractures or con- 
tusions is omitted, as it is ascertained in every case what caused these 
injuries. The results of the injuries are treated of as supplemental, 
as is also the instrument causing the injury, or the form of poison, or 
the method of drowning, etc. The division Various is sub-divided into 
more specific causes, and introduces into this group electric car acci- 
dents, falls, firearms, machinery, overdose of medicine, railroad and 
" otherwise." 

Under Causes Ill-defined, and which are invariably inquired into for 
more satisfactory information, there are a large number which may be 
found in the supplementary list. Blood poisoning is due usually to 
some known traumatic or infectious cause, as is septicaemia. When 
not known it is ill-defined. The cause of coma should be given if 
known, as it may be from cerebral hemorrhage or from uraemia. Con- 
vulsions, not infantile, are usually due to some traceable cause. Ascites, 
colic, dropsy, exhaustion, and inflammation are symptoms and not 
causes. Debility and asthenia, not infantile and not senile, can usually 
be traced to some definite change in the system, otherwise it is ill-de- 
fined. It has been customary heretofore for physicians to give as a 
cause of death '' heart failure," meaning that the heart ceased its action 
or that the cause was a natural one not accompanied by violence. It 
is generally admitted that this is unsatisfactory, and with this compila- 
tion, when the cause of the heart failure cannot be obtained, it is classed 
as ill-defined. While peritonitis may be idiopathic, in most instances a 
cause of the peritonitis has been ascertainable ; it has been classed as 



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270 



APPENDIX. 



iLl-defined if do cause is known. Shock, when occurring as surgical 
shock, being usually the result of accident or surgical operation, is 
classed under these groups. When no accompanying cause is given, 
as might be the case from fright, or sudden joy, the cause is usually 
due to some abnormality of the nervous system or disease of the heart, 
and in the absence of the specific cause must be placed under ill-de- 
fined. When given as a single cause in cases of cerebral hemorrhage 
or apoplexy, the latter cause can be ascertained by inquiry, and proves 
to be the cause in most instances. The following list comprises those 
causes, which have been returned and, not being sufldciently definite, 
have led to inquiry from the physician in attendance. The only causes 
which cannot be more explicitly defined, and are suflficient as primary 
causes are appendicitis and hernia. In these two instances inquiry is 
made as to whether an operation was performed for relief of the condi- 
tion. In acute gastritis it is desirable to ascertain if the condition was 
due to the ingestion of some irritant, as alcohol, poison, or is the re- 
sult of indigestion. More specific cause is asked for in childbirth, mis- 
carriage, premature birth, and stillbirth in order to determine in as 
many cases as possible what was the condition of the mother or the 
complication in confinement which has led up to the result which is the 
cause of the death of the child. By spinal disease is sometimes meant 
disease of the spinal cord, in other cases diseases of the spinal column, 
and calls for inquiry. 



Abscess, 

Accideut, 

Appendicilis, 

Ascites, 

Asphyxia, 

Asthenia, 

Blood Poisoning, 

Bowels, perforation of. 

Burns, 

Brain, concussion- of, 

Brain trouble, 

Brain fever, 

Cancer, 

Carbuncle, 

Childbirth, 

Colic, 

Convulsions, 

Coma, 

Ci'oup, 

Debility, 

Dentition, 



Diabetes, 

Dropsy, 

Drowning, 

Eclampsia, 

Erysipelas, 

Exhaustion, 

Fever, 

Fistula, 

Fractures, 

Gangrene, 

Gastritis, Acute, 

Heart failure. 

Heart trouble, 

Heart, paralysis of, 

Hernia, 

Hemorrhage, 

Homicide, 

Inflammation, 

Laryngeal Obstruction, 

Lungs, (Edema of, 



Malformation, 

Marasmus, 

Miscarriage, 

Mortification, 

Natural causes, 

Necrosis, 

Peritonitis, 

Poisoning, 

Premature Birth, 

Scalds, 

Septicaemia, 

Shock, 

Spasms, 

Spinal Disease, 

Stillborn, 

Strangulation, 

Suffocation, 

Suicide, 

Tumor, 

Wounds. 



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NOMENCLATURE OF CAUSES OF DEATH. 



CLASSES. 

I. General Diseases.—A. specific and febrile. {Zymotic.) 

II. General Diseases.— B. cachetic. {Constitutional.) 

III. Special Diseases. — A. functional or organic. {Local.) 

IV. Special Diseases. — ^^B. developmental. {Developmental^ 
V. Violence. — C. from injuries, etc. ( Violent^ 

SUB GROUPS OR ORDERS. 

CLASS I.— Zymotic Diseases. 

Group one, Communicable. Group two, Dietic. 

CLASS II.— Constitutional Diseases. 

Group one, Diathetic. 

CLASS III.— Local Diseases. 

Group one, Diseases of the Nervous System. Group two, 
Organs of Circulation. Group three, Organs of Respiration. 
Group four. Organs of Digestion. Group five, Urinary Or- 
gans. Group six. Reproductive Organs. Group seven. Osse- 
ous and Locomotory Organs. Group eight. Integumentary 
System. 

CLASS IV.— Developmental Diseases. 

Group one. Of Children. Group two. Of Women. Group 
three, Of Old Age. 

CLASS v.— Deaths by Violence. 

Group one. Accidents and Negligence. Group two. Homi- 
cide. Group three, Suicide. 



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272 



APPENDIX. 

STATISTICAL NOSOLOGY. 



CLASS I.— Zymotic Diseases. 



TA8ULAR LIST. 



F&r TalAe IX of the Hegiatration Repwt. 

Group One. — Communicable. 

I. Que. — 1. Varicella . 

2. Measles 

3. Scarlatina. 

4. Diphtheria 

5. Small Pox 

6. Tonsilitis . 

7. Carbuncle 

8. Erysipelas 

9. Fever, Puerperal 

10. Malignant Pustule 

11. Meningitis, Cerebro Spinal 

12. TeUinus . 

13. Fever, Malarial 

14. Fever, Typhoid 

15. Influenza . 

16. Parotitis . 

17. Pertussis . 

18. Pneumonia 

19. Gonorrhoea 

20. Syphilis . 

21. Hydrocephalus 

22. Scrofula . 

23. Tabes Mesenterica 

24. Tubercular Laryngitis 

25. Tubercular Meningitis 

26. Tubercular Peritonitis 

27. Tuberculosis, Pulmonary 

28. Tuberculosis, General 

Group Two.— Dietic. 

I. Two.— 1. Alcoholism 

2. Inanition . 

3. Purpura and Scurvy 



SUPPLEMENTAL LIST. 



Synonyms or Belated Diseases. 

Group One.— Communi- 
cable. 

I One.— 1. Chicken Pox. 

Miliaria. 

Roseola. 
2. Rotheln. 
8. Scarlet Fever. 
4. Membranous Croup. 

6. Quinsy. 

7. Anthrax. 
Oangrrenoua Boil. 

8. Hospital Gangrene. 
Pyaemia. 

12. Laryngismus. 
Lockjaw. 
Trismus Nascentium. 

16. Mumps. 

17. Whooping Cough. 

18. Congestion of Lungs. 

19. Stricture of Urethra. 
Gonorriiceal Opthalmia. 

22. Psoas (Lumbar) At>8cess. 

Goitre. 

Adenitis. 

Lymphangitis. 

Morbus Coxarius. 

Pott's Disease. 
?7. Iliemoptysis. 



Group Two. — Dietic. 



I. Two.— 1. 



Delirium Tremens. 
Intemperance. , 



CLASS II. — Constitutional Diseases. 



Group One.— Diathetic. 


Group One. — Diathetic. 


11. One.— 1. Anaemia 1 


II. One.— 1. Leucothythaemia. 


2. Cancer, Abdomen 








Chlorosis. 
10. Rheumatic Carditis. 


3. Cancer, Breast . 








Rheumatic Synovitis. 


4. Cancer, Face . 








Gout. 


5. Cancer, Liver . 










6. Cancer, Rectum 










7. Cancer, Stomach 










8. Cancer, Uterus. 










9. Cancer, Various 










10. Rheumatism . 











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APPENDIX. 



273 



CAUSES OF DEATH. 



CLASS in.— Local Diseases. 



TABULAR LIST. 



SUPPLEMENTAL LIST. 



Group One. — Nervous System, 

III. Ouc.— 1. Apoplexy and Paralysis 

2. Cerebrilis . 

3. Chorea 

4. Epilepsy 

5. Insanity 

6. Meningitis . 

7. Meningitis, Spinal 

8. Brain Diseases* . 

9. Nerve Diseases* . 

Group Two. — Circulatory System 

111. Two. — 1. Aneurism . 

2. Angina Pectoris 

3. Endocarditis 

4. Pericarditis 

5. Pblebitis . 

6. Schlerosis . 

7. Heart Diseases* 



III. One.— 1. Cerebral Hemorrhage. 
Locomotor Ataxia. 
Paresis. 
5. Dementia. 
Mania. 
Monomania. 
Melancholia. 

8. Neurasthenia. 
Disease of Spinal Cord. 

9. Hysteria, 
Nervous Prostration. 
Neuritis. 
Myelitis. 
Pleurodynia. 

III. Two.— 7. Hypertrophy. 

Valvular Disease. 

Embolism. 

Thrombosis. 



Group Three.— Respiratory System. 


III. Three.— 1. Asthma .... 


III. Three.— 1. Emphysema. 


2. Bronchitis, Acute 
. 3. Bronchitis, Chronic . 




4. (Edema Glottidis. 
6. Empyema. 


4. Croup 






5. Laryngitis . 




' • 


6. Pleurisy . 

7. Lung Diseases* . 








■ 


Group Four.— Digestive System 




III. Four.— 1. Appendicitis 


III. Four.— 2. Constipation. 


2. Bowels, Obstruction of 


Illeus. 


3. Bowel Diseases* 


Obstipation. 
12. Stomatitis. 


4. Colitis 




(Esophagitis. 


5. Colitis. Entero . 




15. Femoral. 


C. Diarrhoea . 




In^nal. 
Umbilical. 


7. Dysentery . 




, Ventral. 


». Enteritis . 




16. Stricture of (Esopha- 


9. Enteritis, Gastro 




i gus. 

17. Perforation of — 


10. Fistula 

11. Gall Stones 




24. Dyspepsia. 
Gastralgia. 


12. Gastritis 




Ilsematemesis. 


13. Gastritis, Acute . 




1 


14. Hepatitis . 






15. Hernia 






36. Intestines, Stricture of 


1 


17. Intestines, Ulci'ration of 


1 

1 


18. Intussusception . 


' 


19. Jaundice . 






20. Liver, Cirrhosis of 






21. Liver Diseases* . 






22. Spleen Diseases*. 






23. Stomach, Ulceration of 




24. Stomach Diseases* 





* Not otherwise placed. 



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274 



APPENDIX. 



STATISTICAL NOSOLOGY. 



CLASS III. — Local Diseases. — Continued. 



TABULAR LIST. 

Group Five.— Urinary System. 

III. Five.— 1. Bladder Diseases* 

2. Calculus 

3. Cyslitis 

4. Diabetes 

5. Diabetes, Mellitus 

6. Ischuria 

7. Kidney Diseases* 

8. Kidnejf, Brigbt's Dis. of 

9. Nephritis . 

10. Nephritis, Chronic 

11. Prostate Disease . 
Vi. Uraemia 



Group Six.— Generative System. 

FEMALE. 

III. Six. — 1. Ovarian Diseases* 
2. Ovarian Tumor . 
8. Diseases of Uterus 
4. Pyo Salpyux 



Group Seven.— Osseous and Loco- 
motory System. 

III. Seven. — 1. Bones, Diseases of 

2. Joint Diseases* . 

3. Vertebra;, Diseases of . 



Group Eight. — Integumentary Sys- 
tem. 

III. Eight.— 1. Eczema .... 

2. Phlegmon .... 

3. Skin Diseases* . 



Group Nine. — Organs of Special 
Sense. 

III. Nine.-rl. Ossis Petrosi 

2. Otitis 



SUPPLEMENTAL LIST. 



III. Five.-1. Urethritis. 

7. Hematuria. 

8. Albuminuria. 



III. Six.- 



Tumor, Fibroid. 
Pelvic Cellulitis. 
Hemorrhage of. 



III. Seven.-1. Ostitis. 

Periostitis. 
Rickets. 

Caries, Necrosis. 
2. Synovitis. 

Hip Diseases. 
8. Spine, Caries and Nec- 
rosis of. 



III. Eight.— 2. A bscess,part not stated 
Boil. 
8. Pemphigus. 
Psoriasis, etc. 
Dermatitis. 



* Not otherwise placed. 



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APPENDIX. 



275 



CAUSES OF DEATH. 



CLASS IV. — Developmental Diseases. 



TABULAR LIST. 


SUPPLEMENTAL LIST. 


Group One.— Developmental Dis 




J" 


eases of Children. 




IV. One. — 1. Atelectasis Pulmonum 


IV. One.— 5. Asthenia. 


2. Cholera Infantum 


8. Haemorrhagio 


3. Convulsions 


Diathesis. 
11. Malnutrition. 


4. Cyanosis 


13. Imperforate Anus. 


5. Debility, Infantile 


Cleft Palate. 


6. Premature Birth . 




7. Dentition 




8. Hemorrhage, Umbilical 




9. Icterus Neonatorum . 




10. Indigestion . 




11. Innutrition . 




12. Spina Bifida 




13. Other Malformations . 




Group Two. — Developmental Dis 


5- 


eases of Women. 




IV. Two.— 1. Paramenia . 


IV. Two.— 1. Climacteria. 


2. Ditflcult Labor . 




3. Miscarriage . 

4. Placenta Praevia . 






5. Post partum Hemorrhage 




6. Puerperal Eclampsia . 




7. Puerperal Mania . 




8. Puerperal Peritonitis . 




9. Childbirth* . 




Group Three.— Developmental Di 


S- 


eases of Old People. 




IV. Three.— 1. Old Age . . . 




2. Debility, Senile . 




3. Gangrene . 





CLASS V.-Deaths 


by Violence. 


Group One.— Accident or Negli- 


' 


gence. 




V. One.— 1. Asphyxia .... 


; V. One.— 11. Freezing. 


2. Burns and Scalds 

3. Drowning . 






1 Exposure. 
Insolation. 
Lightning. 


4. Electric Car 






1 Surgical Operation. 


5. Falls . 








6. Firearms 






1 


7. Machinery . 








8. Overdose of Medicine 








9. Poison . 








10. Railroad 








11. Otherwise .... 


] 



34 



* Not otherwise placed. 



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276 APPENDIX. 

STATISTICAL NOSOLOGY. 



CLASS v.— Deaths by Violence.— Continued. 

TABULAR LIST. 



Group Two.— Homicide. 



Group Three.— Suicide. 

V. Three.— 1. Drowning . 

2. Hanging 

3. Poison .... 

4. Wounds, ^un or pistol 

5. Wounds, knife . 



SUPPLEMENTAL LIST. 



V. Two.— 1. Infanticide. 
Patricide. 
Matricide. 
Fratricide. 
Filicide. 



V. Tliree.— 8. Arsenic. 

Laudanum. 
Paris Green. 
Other. 



1. Causes ill-defined 



2. Causes not stated 



8. Stillborn 



1. Blood Poisoning. 
Coma. 

Conyulsions (not infantile). 
Colic. 
Debility (not infantile and not 

senile). 
Dropsy or Ascites. 
Exhaustion. 
Heart Failure. 
Inflammation. 
Mortification. 
Peritonitis. 
Septiceemia. 
Shoclc. 
Dentition. 



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APPENDIX B. 



The Laws of Rhode Island 

(As amended February 1, 1896.) 
IN KELATION TO THE BEGISTBATION OF 

BIRTHS, MARRIAGES AND DEATHS, 

AND OF DIVORCE. 



GENEEAL LAWS, CHAPTEE 100. 

OF THE REGISTRA.TION OF BIRTHS, MARRIAGES AND DEATHS. 

Section 1. The town clerks of the several towns, or any person whom the 
board of aldermen of any city, or the town council of any town, may appoint 
for that purpose, shall obtain, chronologically record and index, as required by 
the forms prescribed by section three of this chapter, all information concerning 
births, marriages and deaths occurring among the inhabitants of their respeclive 
towns ; and on or before the first Monday in March, annually, shall make duly 
certified returns thereof to the secretary of the state board of health for the year 
ending on the thirty -first day of December next preceding, accompanying the 
same witb a list of the persons required by law to make returns to them who 
have neglected to do so, and with such remarks relating to the object of this 
chapter as they may deem important to communicate. 

Sec. 2. The secretary of the state board of health shall receive the returns 
made in pursuance of the preceding section, and annually make a general abstract 
and report thereof, in form as prescribed by section three of this chapter, and 
publish not exceeding one thousand copies thereof ; and for preparing, tabulating 
and publishing said annual report such sum as may be provided by law shall be 
paid to the state registrar. Said returns, after such report is prepared^ shall be 
deposited in the ofiice of the secretary of state, who shall cause the same to be 



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278 APPENDIX. 

arraDged, full alphabetical indices of all the names to be made, and the whole to 
be bound in volumes of convenient size and carefully preserved in his office. 

Sec. 3. The blank forms required to carry out the provisions of this chapter 
shall, on application, be furnished by the secretary of the state board of health 
to clergymen, physicians, undertakers, town clerks, clerks of meetings of the 
Society of Friends, and other persons requiring them, substantially as follows : 
The record of a birth shall state the date and place of birth, name of the child if 
it has any, the sex and color of the child, whether born alive or stillborn, the 
name and surname, color, residence and birthplace of the parents, and the occu- 
pation of the father, and the time of recording, so far as the same can be ascer- 
tained. The record of a marriage shall state the dale of the marriage, place, 
name, residence and official station of the person by whom married, names and 
surnames of the parties, age, color, occupation and residence of each, condition, 
that is, whether single or widowed, what marriage, that is, whether first, second, 
third or other marriage, the occupation, birthplace and name of their parents, and 
the time of recording, so far as the same can be ascertained. The record of 
deaths shall state the date of the death, name and surname of deceased, the sex, 
color and condition, whether single or married, age, occupation, place of death, 
place of birth, names and birthplace of parents, disease or cause of death, and 
the time of recording, so far as can be ascertained. 

Sec. 4. Every meeting of the Society of Friends, clergymen and all others 
authorized to join persons in marriage, shall make a faithful record of every such 
rite performed by them, in manner and form aforesaid, and return the same for 
the last preceding month, on or before the second Monday of every month, to the 
town clerk of the town in which such rile shall have been performed ; and no 
marriage shall be solemnized until the parties shall have signed and delivered to 
the person about to solemnize it, or to a clerk of a meeting of the Society of 
Friends, a certificate containing the information required for the record of a mar- 
riage, as prescribed by this chapter. 

Sec. 5. The town clerk of every town shall annually, in the month of Janu- 
ary, collect the information required by this chapter, in relation to all children 
born in the town during the year ending on the thirty -first day of December next 
preceding. 

Sec. 6. Physicians and midwives shall, on or before the fifth day of each 
month, report to the clerk of each city or town a correct list of all children born 
therein during the month next preceding, at whose birth they were present, stat- 
ing the date and place of each birth, the name of the child if it has any, the sex 
and color of the child, the name, place of birth and residence of the parents, and 
the occupation of the father. The fee of the physician or midwife shall be twenty- 
five cents for each birth so reported, and shall be paid by the city or town in 
which the report is made. 

Sec. 7. Whenever any person shall die, or any still-born child shall be brought 
forih in this state, the physician attending at such bringing forth or last sickness, 



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APPENDIX. 279 

if any physician so attended, shall, within forty-eight hours after such death or 
bringing forth, leave with the family, if any, or person having the care of the 
deceased, or the person bringing forth such still-born child, or give to the under- 
taker or person who conducts the funeral, a certificate stating, in case of a death, 
the name of the deceased, the date of the death, and the disease or cause of the 
death, and in case of the bringing forih of a still born child, the date and the 
cause of such child being brought forth still-born. Provided, however ^ that if the 
physician last in attendance shall not have knowledge of such death, or is other- 
wise reasonably prevented from leaving with the family or giving the undertaker 
such certificate within the time hereinbefore specified, or before the funeral or 
disposal of the remains of the deceased, he shall, within five days after having 
knowledge of such death by notification or otherwise, send to the town or city 
clerk or registrar of the town or city in which such death occurred a certificate, 
stating the name, date and disease or cause of death of such decedent. 

Sec. 8. Every town council may appoint a sufficient number of persons to 
act as undertakers, removable at the pleasure of such council. 

Sec. 9. No undertaker or other person shall conduct a funeral, or bury or de- 
posit in a tomb, or remove from this state or otherwise dispose of the remains of 
any deceased person or still-born child, unless he shall first obtain the physician's 
certificate required by section seven of this chapter, if a physician was in attend- 
ance upon such person who has deceased or. the person bringing forth such still- 
born child, and shall return the same, together with his own certificate of the 
information required by section three of this chapter, to the town clerk of the 
town where such death or bringing forth took place : Provided, however, that in 
such towns as allow the burial or removal of bodies of deceased persons without 
a permit from the town clerk, and if the undertaker or other person who has charge 
of the disposal of the remains of the deceased person is unable to obtain the said 
physician's certificate, after reasonable attempts therefor, before the burial or re- 
moval of the said remains, then the said undertaker or other person shall make 
his return as required by section three of this chapter, including the cause of 
death and the name of the physician last in attendance upon the deceased, imme- 
diately to the town or city clerk or registrar of the town or city in which the 
death occurred. He shall, also, within two days thereafter, notify the physician 
last in attendance upon the deceased person of the name and date of death of the 
same. 

Sec. 10. Clergymen of all denominations who officiate at the funerals of dece- 
dents when no undertaker is in attendance, shall, when requested hy the state 
registrar, or the town or city clerk or registrar of the town or city in which such 
deaths occurred, make returns of such deaths in the same manner and with the 
same compensation as undertakers. 

Sec. 11. Any town may make ordinances more effectually to attain the objects 
herein contemplated. 

Sec. 12. The town clerks, or persons appointed as aforesaid, shall receive for 



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280 APPENDIX. 

each record of a death mnde and returned as required by law, and for each record 
of a marriage made and returned as required by law, twenty cents, to be paid to 
them out of their respective town treasuries : Provided, that the yearly compen- 
sation to be paid out of the town treasury as aforesaid, to any one town clerk or 
person appointed as aforesaid, who shall perform the duties prescribed by this 
chapter, shall not be less than five dollars. Undertakers and others making re- 
turns of deaths, as required by sections seven and nine of this chapter, shall re- 
ceive for each full report of a death made to the town clerk, five cents in the 
cities of Providence and Newport, and ten cents in the other towns of the state. 

Sec. 13. Every clergyman, physician, midwife, undertaker, town clerk, clerk 
of any meeting of the Society of Friends, or other person who shall wilfully or 
unreasonably neglect or refuse to perform any of the duties imposed on or re- 
quired of him by this chapter, shall be fined not exceeding twenty dollars nor less 
than two dollars for each offence, one-half thereof to the use of the town in 
which the offence shall occur, and one-half thereof to the use of the person who 
shall complain of the same. 

Sec. 14. Every clergyman, physician, coroner, undertaker, medical examiner, 
or clerk of any meeting of the Society of Friends, shall cause his name, residence 
and post oflSce address to be recorded in the town clerk's office of the town where 
he resides. 

Sec. 15. No letters of administration or letters testamentary shall be granted 
by any court of probate upon the estate of any person, until the death of such 
person, or the facts from which the same is presumed, shall be duly certified, as 
near as may be, to the town clerk, in order that the same may be duly registered 
according to the provisions of this chapter. 

Sec. 16. The town and city clerks, and registrars of the several towns and 
cities, shall have the custody of all records of births, deaths and marriages of 
their respective towns, whether made under the statutes now in force or any for- 
mer statute, and a ceriiflcate signed by them, certifying that any written or printed 
statement of any marriage, birth or death is a true copy of the record in their 
custody, shall be admitted as evidence of such marriage, birth or death. 

Sec. 17. Births, marriages and deaths of non residents shall be distinguished 
from those of residents, in the returns, by being arranged separately. 

Sec. 18. The secretary of the state board of health may, from time to time, 
vary the forms of returns, and require such additional information as he may 
consider necessary to accomplish the object of this chapter. 

Sec 19. The town clerks or other oflScers appointed under this chapter to col- 
lect, record and return the births in the several cities and towns, shall receive fees 
therefor as follows : For making record and return of these facts as required by- 
law, twenty cents for each entry and return ; to be paid by the city or town in 
which the birth is recorded. 

Sec. 20. The clerk or registrar of each town and city shall, on the first day of 
each and every month, make a certified copy of all births, marriages and deaths 



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APPENDIX. 281 

recorded in the books of said town or city during the previous month, whenever 
the parents of the child born, or the bride or the groom, or the deceased person, 
were resident in any other town or city in this stale, or in any other state, at the 
time of said birth, marriage or death ; and shall transmit such certified copies to 
the clerk or registrar of the town, city or state in which such parents of the child 
born, the bride or the groom, or the deceased, were resident at the time of said 
birth, marriage or death, stating, in case of a birth, the name of the street and 
number of the house, if any, where such parents resided, the place of birth of 
such parents, and the maiden name of the mother, whenever the same can be 
ascertained ; and the clerk or registrar so receiving such certified copies shall re- 
cord the same in the books kept for recording births, marriages and deaths. Such 
certified copies shall be made upon blanks to be furnished for that purpose by the 
Secretary of the state board of health. 

Sec. 21. The town clerks of the several towns, or other persons appointed 
under this chapter to collect the births in the several towns, shall annually in the 
month of January collect the facts concerning the births within their respective 
towns, required by this chapter, and shall, so far as practicable, at the same time 
collect the names of all persons liable to be enrolled in the militia, as required by 
title thirty -four, and the census of all persons between the ages of five and fifteen 
years inclusive, as provided by chapter fifty-fonr, and shall receive therefor such 
compensation as the town council or the board of aldermen of their respective 
cities shall determine : Promded, that the city of Providence shall be exempt from 
so much of the provisions of this section as relates to the collection of the statis- 
tics of births. 

Sec. 22. Blanks for the foregoing purposes shall be furnished, on application 
therefor, on or before the first day of December in the year preceding, by the 
state board of health for the collection of births, by the adjutant-general for the 
taking of the enrolled militia, and by the commissioner of public schools for the 
census aforesaid. 

Sec 23. The person or persons who shall discharge the duties required by 
section twenty-one of this chapter, if other than the town clerk, shall make full 
return thereof to the town clerk of his or their town, on or before the tenth day 
of February next following. 

Sec. 24. The returns required to be made by the clerks of the appellate division 
of the supreme court, in relation to divorces, to the secretary of the state board 
of health, or a prepared abstract thereof, shall be published in the annual report 
on the births, marriages and deaths in the state. 



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282 APPENDIX. 



SYNOPSIS OF THE LAW OF MARRIAGE. 



GENERAL LAWS. CHAPTER 191. 



Sbctions 1, 2 and 3 show what kindred persons cannot marry, and declare 
marriages within prohibited degrees null and void. 

Section 4 makes an exception in favor of Jews, within the degrees of affinity 
or consanguinity allowed by their religion. 

Section 5 declares the marriage of persons having a husband or wife living, 
and of idiots and lunatics, absolutely void. 

Sec. 6. Any minister or elder of any religious denomination who shall be 
domiciled in the state, and shall have registered with the town clerk and have re- 
ceived a license, may Join persons in marriage in this state. 

Section 7 designates who shall be considered as belonging to a religious de- 
nomination within the meaning of the preceding section. 

Sec 8. Wardensin the town of New Shoreham may join persons in marriage 
in said town. 

Section 9 designates who may join persons in marriage when solemnized 
among Quakers, or among persons professing the Jewish religion. 

Sec, 10. Every pet son desiring to be joined in marriage in this state shall fur- 
nish to the town or city clerk of the town or city where such person resides, or, if 
such person is not a resident of the state, then to the town or city clerk of the 
town or city where such marriage is to be solemnized, the information called for 
in a blank form provided by the town or city clerk. Such person shall also pro- 
cure from the town or city clerk a certified copy of such blank form so subscribed 
to, and present the same to the person who is to solemnize the marriage. For 
issuing such certified copy the town or city clerk shall be entitled to a fee of one 
dollar. Such clerk shall endorse his certificate upon the back of said copy. 

Section 11 provides for the control of marriages of minors, and requires the 
written consent of the parent or guardian before the information provided for in 
section 10 can be given. Persons over eighteen j'ears of age, however, who may 
have no parent or guardian, may make oath relative to that fact to the city or 
town clerk, and may then give the required information called for in the appli- 
cation. 

Section 12 requires that each of the persons married must present to the offi- 
ciating clergyman a certified copy, as provided in section 10. These must also 
be signed by the respective parties to the marriage in the presence of the clergy- 
man. This is intended to identify the parties as being the same who appeared 
for the certificate from the town clerk. 



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APPENDIX. 283 

Section 13 requires that the officiating clergyman shall endorse the certificate 
stating that he has joined the parties in marriage, and also that two witnesses of 
the marriage shall append their signatures. It also provides that the minister 
shall make a return of the certificate to the town clerk on or before the second 
Monday of the month succeeding the date of the marriage. 

Section 14 provides for the care and preservation of the records. 

Section 15 provides for the work of registration in the city of Providence to 
be done by the city registrar. 

Section 16 provides for the recording of the returned certificates in the office 
of the town clerk, and the final lodgment of the certificates with the secretary of 
state. These are there to be properly indexed, and open to inspection only in the 
presence of some one connected with the office of the secretary of state. 

Section 17 provides that two witnesses shall be present at the marriage cere- 
mony. 

Section 18 provides that lawful objection to a marriage shall be made in writ- 
ing, and the officiating clergyman shall not proceed with the marriage until the 
objection is removed. 

Section 19 provides for a penalty of six months imprisonment, or a fine of one 
thousand dollars, for joining persons in marriage without first having been pre. 
sented with the certified copies required in section 10, or without having first re- 
turned any lawful objection to the marriage. 

Section 20 provides for a penalty a fine of not exceeding one hundred dollars, 
for failure to perform any of the duties devolving upon the officiating officer un- 
der this chapter. 

Section 21 provides for a fine for joining persons in marriage who have a hus- 
band or wife living. 

Section 22 provides that no marriage shall be deemed or adjudged to be void 
by any failure on the part of the officiating officers to comply with the law, if the 
marriage is in other respects lawful, and has been performed with a full belief on 
the part of the persons so married, or either of them, that they have been lawfully 
joined in marriage. 

Sec 23. Every person who shall solemnize a marriage without being legally 
authorized thereto, shall be fined five hundred dollars. 



35 



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284 APPENDIX. 



GENEEAL LAWS. CHAPTEE 195. 



OF DIVORCE. 

Section 1. Divorces from the bond of marriage shall be decreed in case of 
any marriage originally void or voidable by law, and in case either party is for 
crime deemed to be or treated as if civilly dead, or, from absence or other cir- 
cumstances, may be presumed to be actually dead. 

Sec. 2. Divorces shall be decreed for impotency, adultery, extreme cruelty, 
wilful desertion for five years of either of the parties, or for such desertion for a 
shorter period of time in the discretion of the court, for continued drunkenness, 
for the habitual, excessive and intemperate use of opium, morphine or chloral, 
for neglect or refusal on the part of the husband, being of suflacient ability, to 
provide necessaries for the subsistence of his wife, and for any other gross mis- 
behavior and wickedness in either of the parties repugnant to and in violation of 
the marriage covenant. 

Sec. 3. Whenever in the trial of any petition for divorce from the bond of 
marriage, it shall be alleged in the petition that the parties have lived separate and 
apart from each other for the space of at least ten years, the court may in its dis- 
cretion enter a decree divorcing the parties from the bond of marriage, and may 
make provision for alimony. 

Sec. 4. Whenever it shall appear that the absence, adultery, cruelty, desertion 
or other cause of complaint as aforesaid was committed or occasioned by the col- 
lusion of the parties, and done and contrived with an intention to procure a di- 
vorce, in such case no divorce shall be decreed. 

Sec. 5. Whenever a divorce is granted for fault on the part of the husband, 
the wife shall have dower as if the husband were dead ; but such dower shall be 
claimed on proceedings begun within six months after the absolute decree, and, if 
not claimed within said period, or if claim be made for alimony within said period, 
then dower shall be deemed to be waived and released, and the only relief of the 
wife shall be a claim for alimony chargeable upon the estate of the husband, or 
some specific portion thereof, as the court may decree : Prccided^ that in case of 
such divorce between parties married before the Digest of eighteen hundred forty- 
four went into operation, the wife shall be reinstated in all of her real estate, and 
have restored to her all of her personal estate not, in either case, disposed of at 
the date of the filing of the petition for said divorce. 

Sec. 6. Whenever a divorce is granted for fault on the part of the wife, the 
husband, if he be entitled to curtesy-initiate, shall have a life estate in all the lands 



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APPENDIX. 285 

of the wife as if the wife were dead, but subject to such allowance to the wife, to 
be charged on such life estate, as the court in the peculiar circumstances of the 
case may deem just and proper. 

Sec. 7. Otherwise than as provided in the two preceding sections neither hus- 
band nor wife, on divorce being granted, shall have any right in the estate of the 
other. 

Sec. 8. Divorces from bed. board and future cohabitation, until the parties be 
reconciled, may be granted for any of the causes for which by law a divorce from 
the bond of marriage may be decreed, and for such other causes as may seem to 
require the same. In case of such divorce the court may assign to the petitioner 
a separate maintenance out of the estate or property of the husband or wife, as 
the case may be, in such manner and of such amount as it may think necessary 
or proper. 

Sec. 9. Every petition shall be signed by the petitioner, if of sound mind and 
of legal age to consent to marriage ; otherwise, upon application to the court, and 
after notice to the party in whose name the petition shall be filed, the court may 
allow such petition to be signed by a guardian or next friend. 

Sec. 10. No petition for divorce shall be granted unless the petitioner shall, at 
the time of preferring such petition, be a domiciled inhabitant of this state, and 
have resided therein for the period of one year next before the preferring of such 
petition. 

Sec. 11. All such petitions shall be filed, heard and tried in Providence, unless 
the petitioner shall reside in the county of Newport or in the county of Washing- 
ton, in which case such petition shall be filed, heard and tried in Newport or South 
Kingstown respectively. 

Sec 12. The court may by general rule determine the return-day of petitions 
for divorce and prescribe the notice to be given, within or without the state, on 
all such petitions, and may issue such process as may be necessary to carry into 
effect all powers conferred upon it in relation to the same ; and said court may 
also, by general rule, fix the times, during its session, when all petitions for divorce 
shall be heard, as they may be filed in Providence, Newport or South Kingstown, 
respectively. Such general rules shall, however, be subject to such special orders 
as the court may make in special cases. And, until general rules are made, special 
order in each case shall be made. 

Sec. 13. Whenever any petition for divorce shall have been filed or be pending 
in the appellate division of the supreme court, and said court shall be of the opmion 
that sufficient notice of the pendency of said petition shall not, from any cause, 
have been given to the adverse party, said court may order notice or further notice 
to the adverse party to be given in such manner as the court may prescribe. 

Sec. 14. The said court may regulate the custody and provide for the educa- 
tion, maintenance and support of the children of all persons by them divorced or 
petitioning for a divorce, and of all persons to whom a separate maintenance may 
be granted or who may petition for the same ; may in its discretion make such 



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286 APPENDIX. 

allowance to the wife, out of the estate of the husbaDd, for the purpose of enabling 
her to prosecute or defend against any such petition for divorce or separate main- 
tenance, in case she has no property of her own available for such purpose, as they 
may think reasonable and proper ; and may make all necessary orders and decrees 
concerning the same, and the same may at any time alter, amend and annul for 
sufficient cause, after notice to the parties interested therein. 

Sec. 15. Any woman to whom a divorce from the bond of marriage is decreed 
may be authorized by such decree to change her name, subject to the same rights 
and liabilities as if her name had not been changed. 

Sbg. 16. After the filing and during the pendency of any petition for divorce 
the said court may make such interlocutory decrees and grant such temporary 
injunctions as may be necessary until a hearing can be had before said court. 



GENEEAL LAWS. CHAPTER 225. 

OP DIVORCES. 

Section 9. The clerks of the appellate division shall make returns to the sec- 
retary of the state board of health, on or before the first day of March in each and 
every year, for the year ending on the thirty-first day of December preceding, of 
all the applications for divorce, showing the number of applications, the number 
thereof continued, the number granted, and the causes for which the same are 
granted, but without the nam'es of the parlies, in accordance with the blanks which 
shall be furnished them by the secretary of state. 



GENERAL LAWS. CHAPTER 287. 

OF MEDICAL EXAMINERS AND CORONERS. 

Section 1. The governor shall appoint, in each county, able and discreet men , 
learned in the science of medicine, to be medical examiners in such county. 

Sec. 2. The number of medical examiners appointed as provided in the pre- 
ceding section shall be as follows : 

For the county of Washington five examiners, one in each of the five following 
districts, viz. : District one, composed of the town of Westerly ; district two, of 
the town of South Kingstown ; district three, of the town of Hopkinton ; district 
four, of the towns of North Kingstown and Exeter ; district five, of the towns of 
Charlestown and Richmond. 

For the county of Kent two examiners, one in each of the two following dis- 



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APPENDIX. 287 

tricts, viz. : District one, composed of tbe towns of WestGreenwich and Coventry ; 
district two, of the towns of East Qreenwich and Warwick. 

For the county of Providence eleven examiners, one in each of the first nine 
following districts, and in district ten two examiners, viz. : District one, composed 
of the towns of Scituate and Foster ; district two, of the towns of Cranston and 
Johnston ; district three, of the town of Qlocester ; district four, of the towns of 
Smithfield and North Providence ; district five, of the towns of Burrillville and 
North Smithfield ; district six, of the city of Woonsocket ; district seven, of the 
town of Cumberland ; district eight, of the cities of Pawtucket and Central Falls 
and the town of Lincoln ; district nine, of the town of East Providence ; district 
ten, of the city of Providence. 

For the county of Bristol two examiners, one in each of the following districts, 
viz. : District one. composed of the towns of Harrington and Warren ; and district 
two, of the town of Bristol. 

*The number of medical examiners for the county of Newport shall be five, 
one in each of the first three districts and two in district four; and said districts 
shall be composed as follows : District one, of the towns of Tiverton and Little 
Compton ; district two, the town of Portsmouth ; district three, the town of New 
Shoreham ; district four, the city of Newport and the towns of Middletown and 
Jamestown. 

8ec. 3. If either of the medical examiners shall, at any time, from any cause, 
be unable to perform the duties of his said office, or shall be deemed by the attorney- 
general for any cause disqualified therefor, a medical examiner from an adjoining 
district may be called upon to perform them. 

Sec. 4. Every medical examiner shall hold his office for the term of six years, 
and until another is appointed and qualified to act in his place, unless sooner re- 
moved by the appoiDtraent of some other person to fill his place. 

Sec. 5. Every medical examiner shall, within thirty days after his appoint 
ment, and before entering upon the duties of his office, give bond with surety to, 
and to the satisfaction of, the general treasurer in the sum of one thousand dollars 
for the faithful performance of his duties. 

Sec. 6. If the condition of any such bond be broken, to the injury of any 
person, actions may be brought upon such bond as upon the official bonds of 
sheriffs. 

Sec. 7. Medical examiners shall make examinations as hereinafter provided, 
upon bodies of such persons only as are supposed to have come to their death by 
violence : Provided, that in case any prisoner in the state prison or in any county 
jail dies while so imprisoned, it shall be the duty of the medical examiner of the 
district in which such prison or county jail is situated, upon being notified of the 
death of such prisoner, to make at once au examination upon the body of such 
deceased prisoner. 

Sec. 8. When a medical examiner has notice that there has been found, or is 
lying, within his district tbe body of a person who is supposed to have come to 

* As amended April 16, 1896. 



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288 APPENDIX. 

his death by violence, he shall forthwith repair to the place where such body lies 
and take charge of the same ; and if, on view thereof and personal inquiry into 
the cause and manner of the death, he deems a further examination necessary, be 
shall, upon being thereto authorized in writing by the attorney-general, or by the 
mayor of ihe city or president of the town council of the town where such body 
lies, make an autopsy in the presence of two or more discreet persons as wit- 
nesses, and shall then and there carefully reduce, or cause to be reduced, to 
writing every fact and circumstance tending to show the condition of the body 
and the cause and manner of death, together with the names and addresses of 
said witnesses, which record he shall subscribe. Before making such autopsy he 
shall call the attention of the witnesses to the position and api)earance of the 
body. 

Skc. 9. Should the medical examiner deem it advisable to have present a phy- 
sician as one of the witnesses as aforesaid, such physician shall also subscribe the 
record made by the medical examiner, and for such service be shall receive a com- 
pensation of five dollars. 

Sec. 10. Town councils shall elect a suitable person to act as coroner for their 
respective towns, to hold his ofilce for three years and until another is elected and 
qualified to act in his place, unless sooner removed by the election of some other 
person to fill his place. 

Skc. 11. The coroners so elected shall have exclusive jurisdiction as coroners 
in their respective towns. 

Sec. 12. The coroner shall appoint in writing, under his hand and seal, one or 
more discreet persons to act as his deputy in case of his absence or inability to act, 
who shall have all the powers of a coroner, and be subject to like pains and pen- 
allies for malfeasance in office ; and the coroner shall file a copy of the appoint- 
ment in the town clerk's office of his town. 

Sec. 13. The coroner may suspend or discharge a deputy. The suspeusiou or 
discharge of a deputy shall be in writing, addressed to the deputy ; and the coro- 
ner shall forthwith file a duplicate thereof in the town clerk's office of his town. 

Sec. 14. Every coroner and deputy coroner shall, before entering upon the 
duties of his office, take the engagement prescribed in section five of chapter 
twenty-five. 

Sec. 15. Whenever the coroner has notice that there is in his town any person 
who has been injured by the criminal act, omission, or carelessness of another, 
and that said person believes that his death is impending from such injury, said 
coroner may take the statement of auch person concerning the manner in which, 
and the person by whom, such injury was inflicted ; and the statement so taken 
shall be reduced to writing and, if practicable, in the presence of the injured 
person. 

Sec 16. If, upon such view, personal inquiry, or autopsy, the medical exam- 
iner is of the opinion that the death was caused by the act or neglect 'of some 
person other than the deceased, he shall at once notify the attorney -general, and 



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APPENDIX. 289 

coroner of the town where the body was found, or in which it lies, and shall file 
a duly attested copy of the record of his autopsy, or view, with the said coroner 
and a like copy with the attorney-general ; and shall in all cases certify to the 
officer having the custody of the records of deaths in the town in which the de- 
ceased came to his death, the name and residence of the person deceased, if known, 
or, when the name and residence cannot be ascertained, a description of the de- 
ce^ed, as full as possibly may be, for identification, together with the cause and 
manner by and in which he came to his death. 

pEC. 17. The coroner shall thereupon hold an inquest, which may be private ; 
in which case any or all persons, other than those required to be present by the 
provisions of this chapter, may be excluded from the place where such inquest is 
held, and such coroner may also direct the witnesses to be kept separate so that 
they cannot converse with each other until they have been examined. The attor- 
ney-general, or some person designated by him, may attend the inquest and ex- 
amine all witnesses ; and the coronor shall cause the testimony to be reduced to 
writing and signed by the witnesses. The attorney-general may, if he deem it 
necessary or expedient, direct an inquest to be held in the case of any casualty 
from which the death of a person results. 

Sec. 18. The coroner may issue summons for witnesses, returnable before him. 
The persons served with such process shall be allowed the same fees, their attend- 
ance may be enforced in the same manner, and they shall be subject to the same 
penalties, as if served with a summons in behalf of the state in a criminal prose- 
cution pending before a district court. 

Sec. 19. The coroner shall, after hearing the testimony, draw up and sign a 
report, in which he shall find and certify when, where and by what means the 
person deceased came to his death ; his name, if known, and all material circum- 
stances attending his death ; and if it appears that his death resulted wholly or in 
part from the unlawful act of any other person, he shall further state the name of 
such person, if known to him, and he shall file such report, and the testimony by 
him taken, together with a copy of the record of the autopsy or view, in the office 
of the clerk of the court wherein an indictment for the offence may be found. 

Sec. 20. The coroner shall bind such witnesses as he deems necessary, or as 
the attorney-general may designate, by recognizance in a reasonable sum, with 
sufficient surety, to personally appear, at such time as the coronor may designate, 
at the district court of the district wherein the inquest is held, and not depart 
therefrom until discharged by said court ; and if any such witness shall refuse to 
recognize as aforesaid, the coroner shall commit such witness to the jail in the 
same county, there to remain until he shall so recognize or be otherwise discharged 
according to law. 

Sec. 21. If the report of the coronor shall state that the death was caused by 
the unlawful act or by the gross carelessness of any other person, and by whose 
act the same was committed, he shall immediately make a complaint thereof 
against the person accused, in writing and on oath, to the justice or clerk of the 



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290 APPENDIX. 

district court ia the district where the offence was committed, to the intent that 
the person killing or being in any way criminally instrumental to the death, may 
be apprehended ; but nothing herein contained shall be so construed as to prevent 
complaint being made at any time before the finding of the report. And the 
coroner shall forthwith, in writing, notify the attorney -general of the complaint 
aforesaid, that he may appear by himself or some person appointed by him, at 
the examination, and prosecute the complaint in behalf of the state. 

Sec. 22. If a medical examiner reports that a death was not caused by the act 
or neglect of some person other than the deceased, and the attorney -general is of 
a contrary opinion, the attorney -general may, notwithstanding such report, direct 
an inquest to be held in accordance with the provisions of this chapter ; at which 
inquest he, or some other person designated by him, shall examine all the wit- 



Sbc. 23. The medical examiner may, if he deem it necessary, employ a chemist 
to aid in the examination of the body, or of substances supposed to have caused 
or contributed to the death ; and such chemist shall be entitled to such compensa- 
tion for his services as the medical examiner certifies to be just and reasonable, 
the same being audited and allowed in the manner hereinafter provided. 

Sec. 24. When a medical examiner views or makes an examination of the 
dead body of a stranger, he shall cause the body to be decently buried ; and if he 
certifies that he has made careful inquiry, and that to the best of his knowledge 
and belief the person found dead is a stranger, having no settlement in any town 
of the state, his fees, with the actual expense of burial, shall be paid from the 
general treasury. In all other cases the expense of the burial shall be first paid 
by the town wherein the body is found, and such town may recover the money so 
paid from the town where such person last had a settlement : Provided, howeoer, 
that the general treasurer, or any town, ultimately paying any such burial ex- 
penses, shall have the rigfht to recover such burial expenses from the estate of the 
deceased person. 

Sec. 25. When services are rendered in bringing to land the dead body of a 
person found in any of the harbors, rivers or waters of the state, the medical 
examiner may allow such compensation for ttuch services as he deems reasonable ; 
but this provision shall not entitle any person to compensation for services ren- 
dered in searching for a dead body. ^ 

Sec. 26. In all cases arising under the provisions of this chapter, the medical 
examiner shall take charge of any money or other personal property of the de- 
ceased, found upon or near the body, and shall deliver the same to the person 
entitled to its custody or possession ; or if not claimed by such person within sixty 
days, then to an administrator, to be administered upon according to law. 

Sec. 27. A medical examiner who fraudulently neglects or refuses to deliver 
any such property within three days, after demand upon him therefor, shall be 
imprisoned not exceeding two years or be fined not exceeding five hundred dollars. 

Sec. 28. The fees of coroners shall, for the services specified in this chapter, 



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APPENDIX. 291 

be as follows, oamely : For receiving and filing a duly attested copy of ttie record 
of an autopsy, fifty cents ; for every page of two hundred words of written tes- 
timony, thirty cents ; for each day's attendance in holding the inquest, five dollars ; 
for the recognizance of witnesses, thirty -five cents ; and for drawing up and filing 
a report in court, five dollars. Saidfees having been a udited by the state auditor, 
upon certificate of the attorney -general, shall be paid by the general treasurer. 

Sec. 29. Each medical examiner shall receive fees as follows: For a view 
without an autopsy, four dollars ; for a view and an autopsy, thirty dollars ; and 
for travel, at the rate of ten cents a mile to the place of view. He shall also have 
power, in case of an autopsy, to employ a clerk at an expense not exceeding three 
dollars per day for each day's actual service. 

Sec. 80. Every medical examiner shall return an account of the expenses of 
each view or autopsy, including his fees, to the state auditor, and shall annex to 
his return the written authority under which the autopsy was made. The state 
auditor shall audit such account and certify to the general treasurer what items 
in such account are deemed just and reasonable, and such items shall be paid by 
said treasurer to the persons entitled to receive the same. 

Sec. 31. Medical examiners shall, in the books provided by the secretary of 
state, keep a record of all views of bodies found dead, together with their view 
and autopsy reports, and, on the first of January, April, July and October, shall 
forward to the secretary of the state board of health attested copies of such 
records of views, together with the view reports and conclusions from autopsies. 
Should the commission of service of a medical examiner expire before the end of 
a quarter, the said examiner shall at once forward to the said secretary of the state 
board of health the records and reports of all cases unreported at date of expira- 
tion of said service. 

Sec. 32. For each and every copy of said records and reports forwarded to the 
said secretary of the state board of health medical examiners shall receive twenty- 
five cents, which shall be paid by the state upon the voucher of said secretary of 
the state board of health that such copy of reports and records have been received 
by him. 

Sec. 33. The secretary of the state board of health shall cause the returns re- 
ceived by him for each year, in accordance with this chapter, to be bound together 
with an index thereto; the state registrar shall prepare or cause to be prepared 
from the said returns such tabular results as will render them of practical utility, 
and shall make report thereof annually in connection with the report of births, 
marriages and deaths required by chapter one hundred. 



88 



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INDEX. 

See Also Contents, Page V. 



Accidents 18, 19, 31, 32, 53, 53, 66-69, 180-183 

* ' and occupations 81-95 

*• form of, for thirty -one years 183 

Ages at time of deatli ; disease and sex 3, 31, 70, 162 

Alcoholism, 19. 32, 47, 58-61, 184 

Apoplexy 20. 33, 47, 58-61, 185-187 

Births, by towns 2, 4 

" colored 123 

comparative number by towns 103, 104 

** diagram of 112.113 

* ' forty-three years 101 

** illegitimate 131 

laws governing the registration of 276-281 

•* ages of father and mother 125 

*• number of child of mother ... 124 

** parentage 120 

•' plural 8, 126, 127 

" proportion of, to population 106-108 

*' ** " " for twenty-eight years 109 

" rates in towns 103-107 

" season 118,119 

* * sex and localities 115, 1 18 

*• *' for thirty-three years 115, 116 

'' stillborn 128.129,130 

Brain, diseases of 20, 33, 47. 60-63, 178, 179, 188, 189 

Bronchitis 20, 33. 48, 58-61, 178. 179. 190. 191 

Cancers 20, 21, 33, 34. 47, 60-63, 178, 179, 192, 193 

Causes of death, alphabetically arranged 18-43 

'* " nosologically arranged, forty -four years 54-69 

** *' ** *' in divisions of the State 44-53 



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294 INDEX. 

Child birth 22, H5. 51, 66-69. 194, 195 

Cholera infanlum 22. 35. 51, 62-65, 196, 197 

Comparative statistics and comments 177-257 

Deaths, 1896 3 

by counties 5 

causes of 18-53 

•' for each of forty -four years 54-69 

" in alphabetical order, months 18-30 

•* ages 31-43 

** thirteen principal, order, number and proportion 175 

twenty-six principal diseases in 1896. .178, 179 

twenty principal diseases in 1896 : diagram 259 

causes unknown 174 

classification and percentage : table 44-69 

diagram of 170-171 

per 1,000 living, by counties. 16, 155 

proportion of, to population 106, 108, 109 

" ** for twenty-eight years 109 

rates of, in towns and counties 12, 106, 107 

seasons 10,11,159 

sex 156 

summary, forty-three years 101 

Decedents, ages : tables 161-164 

colored 165-167 

comparison with births 156, 157 

" occupations and ages : table 70-79 

" causes of: table 80-97 

" parentage 157 

" season 158, 159 

" sex and age 162-164 

Divorces, law governing registration of 286 

*' statute causes 284 

Dropsy 23,36,229 

compared with diseases of kidney and liver. . 230 

Fevers, malarial 24, 37, 46, 58-61. 211 

typhoid, etc 24, 37, 46, 58-61, 211-214 

** " percentage in different States 215 

Heart, diseases of 24, 37, 48, 58-61, 215-219 

Illegitimates 131, 132 

Influenza 25, 38, 46, 60-63, 178, 179, 219-2^2 

Insanity 25. 38, 47, 58-61, 222-224 

Intemperance (alcoholism, delirium tremens) , 19, 32, 47, 58-61, 81, 184 



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INDEX. 296 

Kidney, diseases of 25, 38, 49, 62-65, 81, 178, 179, 225, 226. 230 

Blight's disease of 25,39,49,62-65 

Laryngitis .25, 38, 48, 62-65 

Laws in relation to registration of births, marriages and deaihs 276-281 

** divorce 284-286 

*' of marriage . 282-283 

" in relation to medical examiners and coroners 286-291 

Liver, diseases of 25. 26, 38. 39, 48, 62-65, 81, 178, 179 

Malarial diseases, fevers 24, 37, 46, 58-61, 211 

Marriages, 1896 2. 4, 9, 133-147 

" ages of persons married 138-143 

'* colored 145 

" comparative number by towns 103-105 

'* denominational 137 

*• and education 147 

" laws governing registration of 276-281 

" " synopsis of 282-283 

nativity of 2, 4, 135. 136 

of the divorced 146,147 

rates in towns 106-108 

•* season 9, 135 

' ' times married 144, 145 

forty-three years 101,102 

** widowers and widows 144, 145 

•• proportion of to population 106-1 08 

'* '* *' for twenty-eight years. ... 109 

Measles 26, 39, 45, 58-61, 231, 232 

Mother, number of child of 124, 125 

Nomenclature of diseases 265-276 

Occupations and ages at death 70-80 

*' ** causes of death 81-97 

*• •• ages of decedents for forty-four years 255-257 

Old age 27,40,52,66-69,81,178,179,233,234 

Paralysis (apoplexy) 20, 33, 47, 58-61, 81, 178, 179, 185-187 

Peritonitis 27,40,233 

Physicians* certificates concerning death 267 

Pneumonia 27, 40, 46. 58-61, 81, 17JS, 179, 235-238 

Population, proportion of births, marriages and deaths to 106 

" geometrically estimated for twenty-eight years 109 

Puerperal fever ; 58-61, 194 

Returns of medical examiners 261-204 

Results, comparative, twenty-one years 245 



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296 INDEX. 

Rheumatism 27, 28, 41, 47, 58-61, 81, 178, 179 

Scarlatina 28, 41, 45, 58-61, 178, 179, 238-239 

*' diphtheria and croup, by season 240 

Still born children 62-65, 128-130 

•* forty-three years 101 , 102 

Suicide 28,29,41,42,53-57.66^9,81.241,242 

Whooping cough (pertussis) 27. 40, 46, 58-61, 178, 179 243, 244 



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